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Home Interior Components - Doors/Windows/Wardrobes

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Working on home interiors requires understanding of a lot of components and materials. Here is a presentation on Home Interior Components and their use in interior space.

For more detail refer - archistudent.net

Publié dans : Design
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Home Interior Components - Doors/Windows/Wardrobes

  1. 1. Walls…Ceiling…Doors…Windows…Floors COMPONENTS AND MATERIALS FOR INTERIOR
  2. 2. Doors: A door is a movable structure used to close off an entrance, typically consisting of a panel that swings on hinges or that slides or rotates inside of a space. When open, they admit ventilation and light. The door is used to control the physical atmosphere within a space by enclosing the air drafts, so that interiors may be more effectively heated or cooled. Doors are significant in preventing the spread of fire. They also act as a barrier to noise They are also used to screen areas of a building for aesthetics, keeping formal and utility areas separate. Doors also have an aesthetic role in creating an impression of what lies beyond. Architectural doors have numerous general and specialized uses. Doors are generally used to separate interior spaces (rooms, closets, etc.) for privacy, convenience, security, and safety reasons. Doors are also used to secure passages into a building from the exterior for reasons of safety and climate control.
  3. 3. TYPES OF DOORS Saloon doors are a pair of lightweight swing doors often found in public bars, and especially associated with the American west. Saloon doors, also known as cafe doors, often use bidirectional hinges which close the door regardless of which direction it is opened by incorporating springs. saloon doors to the kitchen area Blind Door or Gibb door is a door with no visible trim or operable components. It is designed to blend with the adjacent wall in all finishes, and visually to be a part of the wall, a disguised door. Blind Door Aluminum Blind Doors
  4. 4. BARN DOOR : it is a door characteristic of a barn. They are often/always found on barns, and because of a barn's immense size (often) doors are subsequently big for utility Sliding or barn door LOUVRED DOOR : it has fixed or movable wooden fins (often called slats or louvers) which permit open ventilation while preserving privacy and preventing the passage of light to the interior. Being relatively weak structures, they are most commonly used for wardrobes and drying rooms, where security is of less importance than good ventilation, although a very similar structure is commonly used to form window shutters Interior Louvered Doors Louvered Doors
  5. 5. FLUSH DOOR : It is a completely smooth door, having plywood or MDF fixed over a light timber frame, the hollow parts of which are often filled with a cardboard core material. Skins can also be made out of hardboards, the first of which was invented by William H Mason in 1924. Called Masonite, its construction involved pressing and steaming wood chips into boards. Flush doors are most commonly employed in the interior of a dwelling, although slightly more substantial versions are occasionally used as exterior doors, especially within hotels and other buildings containing many independent dwellings flush door MOULDED DOOR: it has the same structure as that of flush door. The only difference is that the surface material is a moulded skin made of MDF. Skins can also be made out of hardboards. LEDGE AND BRACE DOOR: it is a door made from multiple vertical planks fixed together by two horizontal planks (the ledges) and kept square by a diagonal plank (the brace). LEDGE AND BRACE DOOR
  6. 6. WICKET DOOR: it is a pedestrian door built into a much larger door allowing access without requiring the opening of the larger door. Examples might be found on the ceremonial door of a cathedral or in a large vehicle door in a garage or hangar. WICKET DOOR BIFOLD DOOR: is a door unit that has several sections, folding in pairs. Wood is the most common material, and doors may also be metal or glass. Bifolds are most commonly made for closets, but may also be used as units between rooms. BIFOLD DOOR SLIDING GLASS DOOR: sometimes called an Arcadia door or a Patio door, is a door made of glass that slides open and sometimes has a screen (a removable metal mesh that covers the door. SLIDING GLASS DOOR
  7. 7. WINDOW it is a transparent opening in a wall or door that allows the passage of light and, if not closed or sealed, air and sound. Windows are usually glazed or covered in some other transparent or translucent material like a float glass. Windows are held in place by frames, which prevent them from collapsing in. Many glazed windows may be opened, to allow ventilation, or closed, to exclude inclement weather. SASH WINDOW : it is the traditional style of window in the United Kingdom, and many other places that were formerly colonized by the UK, with two parts (sashes) that overlap slightly and slide up and down inside the frame. The two parts are not necessarily the same size. Types of windows SASH WINDOW Single-hung sash window: One sash is movable (usually the bottom one) and the other fixed. This is the earlier form of sliding sash window, and is also cheaper Single-hung sash window
  8. 8. HORIZONTAL SLIDING SASH WINDOW: Has two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame. In the UK, these are sometimes called Yorkshire sash windows, presumably because of their traditional use in that county. Horizontal sliding sash window CASE MENT WINDOW : A window with a hinged sash that swings in or out like a door comprising either a side- hung, top-hung (also called "awning window"; see below), or occasionally bottom-hung sash or a combination of these types, sometimes with fixed panels on one or more sides of the sash. CASE MENT WINDOW AWNING WINDOW: An awning window is a casement window that is hung horizontally, hinged on top, so that it swings outward like an awning AWNING WINDOW
  9. 9. HOPPER WINDOW: A hopper window is a bottom hung casement window that opens similar to a draw bridge typically opening to the outside. HOPPER WINDOW TILT AND SLIDE WINDOW: A window (more usually a door-sized window) where the sash tilts inwards at the top and then slides horizontally behind the fixed pane. TILT AND SLIDE WINDOW TRANSOM WINDOW: A window above a door; in an exterior door the transom window is often fixed, in an interior door it can open either by hinges at top or bottom, or rotate on hinges. It provided ventilation before forced air heating and cooling. A fan-shaped transom is known as a fanlight, especially in the British Isles. TRANSOM WINDOW
  10. 10. CLEARSTORY WINDOW : A window set in a roof structure or high in a wall, used for daylighting CLEARSTORY WINDOW BAY WINDOW: A multi-panel window, with at least three panels set at different angles to create a protrusion from the wall line BAY WINDOW ORIEL WINDOW: A window with many panels. It is most often seen in Tudor- style houses and monasteries. An oriel window projects from the wall and does not extend to the ground. Oriel windows originated as a form of porch. They are often supported by brackets or corbels. Buildings in the Gothic Revival style often have oriel windows. ORIEL WINDOW
  11. 11. THERMAL WINDOW: Thermal, or Diocletian, windows are large semicircular windows (or niches) which are usually divided into three lights (window compartments) by two vertical mullions. The central compartment is often wider than the two side lights on either side of it. THERMAL WINDOW FIXED WINDOW: A window that cannot be opened, whose function is limited to allowing light to enter (Unlike an unfixed window, which can open and close). Clerestory windows are often fixed. Transom windows may be fixed or operable. FIXED WINDOW PICTURE WINDOW: A very large fixed window in a wall, typically without glazing bars, or glazed with only perfunctory glazing bars near the edge of the window. Picture windows are intended to provide an unimpeded view, as if framing a picture PICTURE WINDOW
  12. 12. MULTI-LIT WINDOW: A window glazed with small panes of glass separated by wooden or lead "glazing bars", or "muntins", arranged in a decorative "glazing pattern" often dictated by the architectural style at use. Due to the historic unavailability of large panes of glass, this was the prevailing style of window until the beginning of the 20th century, and is traditionally still used today. MULTI-LIT WINDOW STAINED GLASS : A window composed of pieces of colored glass, transparent, translucent or opaque, frequently portraying persons or scenes. Typically the glass in these windows is separated by lead glazing bars. STAINED GLASS
  13. 13. A closet (especially in North American usage) is a small and enclosed space, a cabinet, or a cupboard in a house or building used for general storage or hanging clothes. A closet for food storage is usually referred to as a pantry. A closet, through French from Latin clausum, "closed" began life in the 17th century as a small private room, often behind a bedroom, to which a man or woman could retire, for privacy, reading, or enjoyment of personal works of art: for this usage, see Cabinet (room). CLOSETS: Modern closets can be built into the walls of the house during construction so that they take up no apparent space in the bedroom, or they can be a large, free-standing piece of furniture designed for clothing storage, in which case they are often called a wardrobe or armoire. TYPES OF CLOSETS: Broom closet: A narrow floor-to-ceiling space for the storage of lengthy items. To come out of the broom closet means to admit to being a Wiccan. Broom closet COAT CLOSET: A coat closet is a closet of a house where people store their hoods, jackets and coats. A coat closet is typically located in the entryway, so that it is close to the front door.
  14. 14. LINEN CLOSET: A tall, narrow closet, typically located in or near bathrooms and/or bedrooms. Such a closet contains shelves used to hold towels, washcloths, sheets, and toiletries. LINEN CLOSET SPEAR CLOSET: An architectural slang term for a small, oddly shaped, "left over" space, whether actually used as a closet or not. UTILITY CLOSET: A closet used for permanently housing appliances, most commonly the heating/cooling unit and water heater, especially in apartments where they cannot be put in a garage, attic, or basement. UTILITY CLOSET WALK-IN CLOSET: A closet large enough to walk inside to store clothes on two or three sides. They may have lighting, mirrors, and flooring distinct from adjacent rooms. WALK-IN CLOSET
  15. 15. WALL CLOSET: A very shallow closet closed off from a room by a curtain or folding doors, with only enough depth to hang clothes or store them folded on shelves. WALL CLOSET WATER CLOSET: (WC) is not a storage closet but a flush toilet. The term comes from the British English definition of a closet as a small private room. In this case, it was a small private room with running water. WATER CLOSET

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