Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.
Company Profile
Bosch is a global supplier of technology and services.
In 2013, its roughly 281,000 associates generated s...
employee base is diverse, and the company’s 70 sites
are spread throughout the country, leading to a wide
range of socioec...
Results
The focus groups yielded a gold mine of information
for both Bosch and HealthFitness. After seeing the
results, Bo...
© 2015 Health Fitness Corporation
800.639.7913 | www.healthfitness.com
Key Considerations
The success of the focus group p...
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

How Bosch uses focus groups to boost workplace wellness

427 vues

Publié le

Bosch is a global supplier of technology and services and partners with HealthFitness to provide corporate wellness programs to its 24,600 U.S. employees in 70 sites. HealthFitness conducted focus groups to help Bosch engage its manufacturing workers in corporate wellness programs and, by extension, in their own health and well-being.

Publié dans : Santé & Médecine
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

How Bosch uses focus groups to boost workplace wellness

  1. 1. Company Profile Bosch is a global supplier of technology and services. In 2013, its roughly 281,000 associates generated sales of $61.2 billion. In the U.S., it has 24,600 employees in more than 70 locations. Domestic sales top $10.6 billion. Its operations are divided into four business sectors: automotive technology, industrial technology, consumer goods, and energy and building technology. Focus groups pinpoint what Bosch employees need to engage in their health Case study: Know your employees to boost workplace wellness
  2. 2. employee base is diverse, and the company’s 70 sites are spread throughout the country, leading to a wide range of socioeconomic, education and literacy levels. HealthFitness sought to bridge that gap by identifying what the manufacturing workers wanted and needed in order to engage in their own health and wellness. The Solution HealthFitness first looked at the data collected during the programs’ first two years. It soon became clear that, although the programs were successful for those who took part, they needed to reach many more. HealthFitness proposed conducting focus groups at selected plant sites. Bosch had previously sent out surveys, but HealthFitness explained that this population needed face-to-face contact. Bosch agreed with this “meet them where they live” approach. HealthFitness selected nine sites across the U.S. The sample provided a mix of plant sizes, geographic and union vs. nonunion employee bases. The focus groups were structured as informal conversations; they included up to 12 individuals from each site. The Challenge HealthFitness, entering the third year of its corporate wellness program with Bosch, faced two related issues. First, find out why roughly 40 percent of the employees were not participating in health management activities. The second—necessary to create a resolution to the first—was to determine what these workers wanted from a health management program. Communications about incentives and wellness program offerings were not completely reaching a primary target of the population, the plant/ manufacturing group. Health screening communication was quite effective, and workers—whether they were on the manufacturing floor or in the front office—took part. However, participation in nutrition and activity programs was lower among plant employees in particular and—as the focus groups revealed—these employees were less informed about the offerings. Effective communication proved particularly challenging with the plant workers. Flyers sent to employees’ homes were less effective than anticipated, but e-communications were not consistently effective, either. Most plant employees lacked Internet access at work, and many didn’t own smart phones. Manufacturing employees in general tend to have limited access and comfort with technology. Bosch’s Boosting workplace wellness Workplace wellness is about relationships. […] That means meeting them where they are physically, emotionally and psychologically and understanding competing priorities in their lives.
  3. 3. Results The focus groups yielded a gold mine of information for both Bosch and HealthFitness. After seeing the results, Bosch worked with its communications firm to discuss and consider adapting and modifying messaging around employee health, workplace wellness and corporate fitness at all its sites. Among the findings driving these changes: Names matter. Some of health management programs sounded too feminine to attract the rural, blue-collar, largely male workforce, especially the walking and nutritional programs. Money influences behavior. Plant workers indicated they would be more likely to respond and participate if it were clear that, by participating, there may be a financial reward. In short, money was more appealing than improved health for initial engagement. Promotional material emphasized the healthy change; the incentive followed, but often in smaller print. Peer pressure works. The focus groups indicated that offering an extra $50 if the entire plant reached a certain percentage of participation would make a difference. Wellness champions get respect. One of the most highly praised aspects of the program was the use of wellness champions—Bosch employees who are the “point persons” for wellness. But these individuals are often overburdened. Employees are often overburdened. Many of the focus group participants talked about having no time for anything beyond work. Family issues, financial stress and other factors left many overwhelmed. Action: Bosch, HealthFitness and the communications firm revised some of the names and how the programs were promoted. Action: Consideration for poster messaging to more heavily reflect the financial impact so copy read, “Want to find out how to get $100?,” followed by program information. Action: Incentives—and how they are communicated— are being revisited to include this aspect. Action: Consideration to include a “champion recruitment day” to add more champions at select sites to help communicate and reinforce the overall wellness initiative and program. Action: Bosch and HealthFitness are exploring ways to make participation simpler and more convenient. One approach under consideration is to offer credit for wellness activities employees already do (e.g., playing softball or horseshoes).
  4. 4. © 2015 Health Fitness Corporation 800.639.7913 | www.healthfitness.com Key Considerations The success of the focus group provides important engagement lessons for other employers—especially those in manufacturing. • Know your audience. There’s often a disconnect between the corporate “ivory tower”—which manages benefits—and the plant floor. Bridging that gap may require face-to-face contact—and someone who has worked in a plant environment before. For the focus groups, the HealthFitness team included at least one person with such experience. • Keep it simple. Plant workers are generally not interested in logging in to track participation or to redeem rewards. They don’t want to add anything to their over-filled plates. Simplifying access can take many forms, from adding kiosks to the plant floor to creating programs and communication tools that address what the workers want to do. One such example: “Get fit for hunting season.” • Start where the employees are, not where you want them to be. Workplace wellness is about relationships. That’s why the focus groups were successful: HealthFitness—and through them, Bosch—learned about the people using the services. That means meeting them where they are physically, emotionally and psychologically and understanding competing priorities in their lives. • Designate champions. Focus group participants had high praise for the on-site wellness champions. Having a fellow employee advocate for participation had significant influence on coworkers. The HealthFitness program managers also received high marks, reinforcing the importance of a hands-on approach to program design. • Start with the end in mind. Everything Bosch and HealthFitness did, from the focus groups to the revamping of its communications efforts, were in service of one goal: Engage the manufacturing workers in corporate wellness programs and, by extension, in their own health and well-being. Boosting workplace wellness Ann Wyatt Regional Vice President With 25 years of experience in employee health programs, Ann is responsible for launch and ongoing management of more than 140 corporate employee health and fitness programs.

×