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By Matthew Arnold
Matthew Arnold (1822 –1888)was a British poet and cultural critic whoworked as an inspector of schools.And he was also one...
Matthew Arnold wrote "Dover Beach" during or shortly after a visit   he and his wife made to the Dover region of southeast...
The town of Dover is closer to France than any other port cityin England. The body of water separating the coastline of th...
The poet/persona uses first-, second-, and third-person point of viewin the poem.Generally, the poem presents the observat...
Then he shifts to first-personpoint of view when heincludes his beloved andthe reader as co-observers,as in Line 18 (we), ...
He also uses first-person point ofview to declare that at least oneobservation is his alone, andnot necessarily that of hi...
The person addressed in the poem—Lines 6, 9, and 29—is MatthewArnolds wife, Frances LucyWightman. However, since thepoem e...
Arnold’s central message is this:Challenges to the validity of long-standing theological and moralprecepts have shaken the...
In Arnold’s world of the mid-1800s, thepillar of faith supporting society wasperceived as crumbling under the weightof sci...
Arnold, who was deeply religious, lamented the dying of the lightof faith, as symbolized by the light he sees in “Dover Be...
“Dover Beach” is a poem with the mournfultone of an elegy and the personalintensity of a dramatic monologue.Because the me...
Arnold uses a variety of figures of speech, including thefollowing examples.Alliterationto-night , tide; full, fair (Lines...
Metaphor:which the waves draw back, and fling(comparison of the waves to an intelligent entity that rejects that which it ...
Metaphor:breath of the night-wind(comparison of the wind to a living thing)Simile:the world, which seems / To lie before u...
Dover beach
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Dover beach

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Dover beach

  1. 1. By Matthew Arnold
  2. 2. Matthew Arnold (1822 –1888)was a British poet and cultural critic whoworked as an inspector of schools.And he was also one of the chief Victorianpoets.Matthew Arnold has been characterized asa sage writer, a type of writer whochastises and instructs the reader oncontemporary social issues.
  3. 3. Matthew Arnold wrote "Dover Beach" during or shortly after a visit he and his wife made to the Dover region of southeastern England, the setting of the poem, in 1851. They had married in June of that year. A draft of the first two stanzas of the poem appears on a sheet of paper he used to write notes for another work, "Empedocles on Etna,"
  4. 4. The town of Dover is closer to France than any other port cityin England. The body of water separating the coastline of thetown from the coast of France is the Strait of Dover, north of the English Channel and south of the North Sea.
  5. 5. The poet/persona uses first-, second-, and third-person point of viewin the poem.Generally, the poem presents the observations of the author/personain third-person point of view but shifts to second person when headdresses his beloved, as in Line 6 (Come), Line 9 (Listen! you),and Line 29 (let).
  6. 6. Then he shifts to first-personpoint of view when heincludes his beloved andthe reader as co-observers,as in Line 18 (we), Line 29(us), Line 31 (us), and Line35 (we).
  7. 7. He also uses first-person point ofview to declare that at least oneobservation is his alone, andnot necessarily that of his co-observers. This instance occursin Line 24: But now I onlyhear. This line means But nowI alone hear.
  8. 8. The person addressed in the poem—Lines 6, 9, and 29—is MatthewArnolds wife, Frances LucyWightman. However, since thepoem expresses a universalmessage, one may say that she canbe any woman listening to theobservations of any man.
  9. 9. Arnold’s central message is this:Challenges to the validity of long-standing theological and moralprecepts have shaken the faith of people in God and religion.
  10. 10. In Arnold’s world of the mid-1800s, thepillar of faith supporting society wasperceived as crumbling under the weightof scientific postulates, such as theevolutionary theory of English physicianErasmus Darwin and French naturalistJean-Baptiste Lamarck. Consequently, theexistence of God and the whole Christianscheme of things was cast in doubt.
  11. 11. Arnold, who was deeply religious, lamented the dying of the lightof faith, as symbolized by the light he sees in “Dover Beach” on the coast of France, which gleams one moment and is gone the next. He remained a believer in God and religion, although he was open to—and advocated—an overhaul of traditional religious thinking.
  12. 12. “Dover Beach” is a poem with the mournfultone of an elegy and the personalintensity of a dramatic monologue.Because the meter and rhyme vary fromline to line, the poem is said to be in freeverse--that is, it is unencumbered by thestrictures of traditional versification.However, there is cadence in the poem,achieved through the following:
  13. 13. Arnold uses a variety of figures of speech, including thefollowing examples.Alliterationto-night , tide; full, fair (Lines 1-2);gleams, gone; coast, cliff; long line; which the waves; folds, furledAssonance: tide, lies;Paradox and Hyperbole: grating roar of pebbles
  14. 14. Metaphor:which the waves draw back, and fling(comparison of the waves to an intelligent entity that rejects that which it has captured)Metaphor:turbid ebb and flow of human misery(comparison of human misery to the ebb and flow of the sea)Metaphor:The Sea of Faith(comparison of faith to water making up an ocean)Simile:The Sea of Faith . . . lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled(use of like to compare the sea to a girdle)
  15. 15. Metaphor:breath of the night-wind(comparison of the wind to a living thing)Simile:the world, which seems / To lie before us like a land of dreams(use of like to compare the world to a land of dreams)Anaphora:So various, so beautiful, so new(repetition of so)Anaphora:nor love, nor light, / Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain(repetition of nor)

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