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  1. 1. Homework Help https://www.homeworkping.com/ Research Paper help https://www.homeworkping.com/ Online Tutoring https://www.homeworkping.com/ click here for freelancing tutoring sites Along with the notion of Experience Economy, Employee experience is defined as what an employee received during their interaction with careers’ elements (e.g. firms, supervisors, coworkers, customer, environment, etc.) that affect their cognition and affection and leads to their particular behaviors.[1][2] Employee Experience Management (EEM) is conceptualized by Abhari as an approach to deliver excellent experience to employees, which leads to the positive customer experienceby emphasizing on their experiential needs - like Experiential Marketing for external customers.[3][4] Harris (2007) hinted, “It [customer experience] begins at the heart of an organization. It begins with employees who are being the strategy and living the brand”. EEM, same as Internal marketing, is an internal approach by focusing on employees (internal customer) prior to external customers.[5] The notion of EEM comes from the question of how firms make sure that employees create the desirable customer experience, whenever they interact with customers or provide the information and services to them (Schmitt, 2003, p. 219).[6] Alternatively, utilizing employees in delivering brand value promise is remarkable concern in EEM. EEM also goes beyond standard Human Resource Management by rewarding more employee-experience in form of both professional and personal development (Schmitt, 2003, p. 207).[7] Internal communications, a core principle of delivering EEM[8] and employee engagement is a common characteristic amongst top employers[9] but surprising scarce generally; “feedback is the key to giving employees a sense of where they’re going, but many organizations are remarkably bad at giving it."[10] There are various ways that businesses can engender a culture of regular, open communication. These range from regular (weekly or monthly) departmental team meetings to monthly or quarterly meetings of the entire business. Where having actual meetings is not always possible, due to the nature of the business, shift work or having multiple locations an intranet can allow companywide dialogue.
  2. 2. Enclosed corporate social networks[11] allow more interaction between team members who do not physically interact on a regular basis such as telecommuters or teams based in different offices. Zappos encourage their employees to be ‘weird’ (image:© Zappos 2010) More and more organisations are coming to the realisation thatin order to deliver a greatcustomer experience you mustfirstcreate an engaging employee experience.There is no doubt that creating a powerful customer experience requires the full and continual commitmentofthe people responsible for making ithappen.This article describes how brands like Zappos,innocentand The Geek Squad create ‘wow’ experiences for their employees and customers and,in so doing,outstanding results for their shareholders. The importance of bonding emotionally with customers The essence ofa highly distinctive customer experience lies in the emotional connection made with the customer.As Tom Ford said when he was Chief Designer atGucci, “a brand is a memory”.It is how it makes the customer fe el aboutthe experience. Indelible memories are more often created by the intangible attributes than the tangible. Research by Ogilvy for their annual BrandZ loyalty survey found that companies “….successful in creating both functional and emotional bonding had higher retention ratios (84% vs. 30%) and cross-sell ratios (82% vs.16%) compared with those thatdid not”. This is a significantdifference and one that is more than sufficientto negate the effects of the economic downturn.It is for this reason that brands like Burberry, FirstDirect and O2 have continued to grow their customer base and thrive while their competitors have lostmarketshare and seen declining loyalty from both customers and employees. How then, do you create customer experiences thatcreate an emotional bond with your brand? The answer lies in having a greatproduct for sure – Apple would not be the brand it is withoutleading edge design – butjustas importantly,it is the ability to have customers interactwith your products and brand at a deep level that creates true loyalty. Anyone who has visited an Apple store and received help at the ‘Genius Bar’ or spoken with one of the highly knowledgeable and enthusiastic store associates would know thatthe in-store experience is a stage for the brand and the store people the actors who bring it alive. Justas with any theatrical production,casting,direction and rehearsals are essential to top performance on the night. We have justcompleted two years of research with leading brands for our forthcoming book‘BOLD – how to be brave in business and win’. The book tells the story of 14 brands who are challenging the rules ofbusiness and delivering highlydistinctive experiences.The stories are told through the words of the executives, employees and,in some cases,the customers themselves.Whatstruck us in conducting our research was the unusual attention paid to the employee experience by the brands we studied:brands like Zappos,innocentand The Geek Squad. Cult-like culture The qualitative research was supported bya survey where we measured the perceptions ofthe BOLD brands with a control group of executives from other organisations.The BOLD companies outscored the control group on the 8 dimensions and 40 practices measured in our survey by a significantmargin.You will have to wait for the book to be published for the full detail but what I can share with you is that one of the dimensions thatshowed greatest difference was whatwe labelled ‘a cult-like culture’.Now the term ‘cult’ tends to carry negative connotations.It conjures up images offringe religious groups ofsome kind following the warped vision ofa charismatic leader.Butif we examine whatmakes a group ‘cult-like’ the attributes are neither good nor bad; it is the vision or purpose that drives them that is good or bad and which provides the context for their actions. One brand that has attracted an enthusiastic following ofcustomers is the US on-line retailer Zappos.Zappos sells shoes and other items ofapparel butthat is not its purpose.According to Tony Hseah,its ChiefExecutive, the purpose ofthe organisation is to deliver happiness through‘wow’experiences.He calls ittheir ‘secretsauce’.The organisation defines a ‘wow’ experience as one thatgoes way beyond what you expected. One example is when Wendy Fitch, a regular Zappos customer,posted an ‘outof office’ announcementin her Outlook saying that she was away on a charity run for breastcancer.When the Zappos e-mail letter she subscribed to,bounced back one of the agents in the call centre picked it up. During her lunch break the agent purchased a gift card and sentit to Wendy with this message: “Hello,Wendy, while working through e‐mails from our amazing customers,I came across your auto‐reply.Normally we mark them as auto‐replies butyours caughtmy eye. I just wanted to let you knowwhat an admirable thing you are
  3. 3. doing.We at Zappos are proud to have you as a customer and as a part of our family.Thank you for being a wonderful person.” So what was it that motivated that agentto take that action? From our research we would suggestthere are a number of key factors… ‘Purpose beyond profit’ This may come as a shock butmostemployees do notleap out of bed in the morning excited by the prospectof making more profitfor their organisation thatday. This may serve to motivate the senior executives but it rarely does so for the front-line unless they also happen to be shareholders too as in the case of the John Lewis Partnership. What motivates employees is feeling connected to a cause.That cause can be ‘Delivering Happiness’ as in the case of Zappos or ‘saving the planet’ as in the case of the World Wildlife Fund. If you ask employees ofUmpqua,the communitybank based in Oregon,what their purpose is,they will tell you “making customers feel dealing with Umpqua was the bestthing that happened today”. Quite a tall order for a bank! The financial services sector is one that generallyhas low levels of emotional engagementwith its customers. ‘Hire for DNA not MBA’ We wrote aboutthis in our firstbook, ‘Uncommon Practice’, but we found that it is still true for these brands.The fact is that there are many bright, well-qualified people outthere that you can hire, but only a few of them will be the right fit for your brand. We tell our clients “hire for DNA not MBA”. In other words,find the people who share your values and teach them the skills they need.Umpqua advertises for employees in retail trade magazines,notthe financial services press because itwants people who understand customer service rather than banking.Tony Hseah offers recruits $2,000 at the end of their first week of training to leave the company. Why? Because he only wants people who are passionate aboutthe brand and committed to whatit stands for. ‘Rites and rituals’ Sustaining a culture is very hard, particularlyif you are growing.One of the things these brands do is to reinforce their uniqueness through the use ofwhat we describe as ‘rites and rituals’.Umpqua has a daily‘motivational moments’ session where everyone gathers to hear someone sing a song,tell a joke or conducta shortexercise in some way related to their purpose.Zappos encourages their employees to be ‘weird’ which means they organise parties and theme events where people dress up and have fun. They engage in ‘Zuddles’ which are short,motivational work- group meetings.Innocent,the UK smoothie maker holds its AGM (A Grown-up Meeting) where all the employees gather to hear the latestnews and then have a barbeque.The Geek Squad, the computer supportfirm,uses language and titles to reinforce the zany culture whose sole purpose is to ‘save your ass’ ifyour computer should crash.Their employees are called ‘agents’ or ‘double-agents’ and encouraged to share their stories ofdaring-do in helping customers through the intranetsite butalso social media. Making it work… You may be reading this and saying to yourself“well,you mightbe able to do that kind of thing in the States but not here.” You would be wrong.We have seen examples ofbrands thatfocus on purpose beyond profit, hiring for DNA and encouraging rites and rituals in the UK, US, Brazil and Asia. Of course,if these practices are false or forced, they become trite and will not deliver value for your brand;but when they are driven by a common purpose and sh ared values,when they are sincere,when they create a great employee experience and when they resultin a ‘wow’ experience for customers – they work. It's our mantra, one which many companies need to adopt: 'To deliver the desired customer experience, companies must develop, nurture and engage their employees.' At McDaniel Partners, we understand the importance of engaging employees. It's the first step to engaging customers. So how does a company become nurturing and fully engaging internally?
  4. 4. The short answer is through understanding and building. You make sincere efforts to understand your employees, their struggles, their frustrations and their needs. Then, you build an environment that every employee will be proud to call their own. The employee experience is a set of beliefs that your employees have about your company - and make no mistake, it's those beliefs that make employees show up in the morning. We have developed a program to help companies create engaged and committed employees. What are the components of the program? Examine the current experience. What does your current experience look like? What makes your company different, interesting or valuable? What behaviors are most characteristic of your company? Where are the employee "moments of truth" where the company is at its best? Worst? We will help you to understand what your current employee experience looks like. Assess current levels of employee engagement. What percentage of your employees are engaged? Does it vary by region? By team? Which teams are fully engaged? We will identify how many of your employees are fully engaged and which are just simply 'showing up'. Understand the drivers of employee engagement. What are your employees looking for in terms of psychological, emotional as well as economic benefits? What creates meaning for your employees? We help you to better understand what your employees really want from management and your company. Define the future employee experience. What are the components of the experience? What differentiates the experience from other companies? We will help you to define something that engages your employees. That creates pride and enthusiasm about working with you. Something that everyone will be proud to call their own. Build programs that build an emotional connection.Creating engaged and committed employees starts with winning the hearts of your employees. To get there, employees need to move through three primary stages, from merely being aware of the employee experience and what it stands for ("Hearing It"), to understanding their role in delivering against the brand promise ("Believing It"), to finally becoming passionate advocates for the company ("Living It"). Build a program to help your Managers increase employee engagement. Do your Managers know how to engage their employees? Do they have the tools and coaching to create employees who are proud to say they belong at your company? We will ensure that your Managers have both the tools and the skills to build engaged and committed employees.
  5. 5. Continually measure the impact. Are the levels of employee engagement increasing? What are the key areas for improvement? We will help you identify how to continually increase levels of engagement. Aligning employee experiences with customer experiences Posted by Olivier Blanchard John Moore recently wrote a piece on his Brand Autopsy blog in which he answered this question from a reader: Judy: “Can you tell me what it means to create an employee experience? How do the best companies ensure that the employee experience is aligned to the customer experience?" The question is as unusual as it is insightful - and considering the amount of posts recently that address the issue of employee morale and its impact on brands, it couldn't have come at a better time. John answers "creating meaningful employee experiences revolves around making the company something employees can believe in (tribal truth #32). It’s also about a company realizing that its products do not make great brands but rather, its people make brands great (tribal truth #37)." Pow. He continues: "The best companies, namely those listed as one of Fortune Magazine’s "100 Best Companies to Work for in America," spend just as much time marketing to its employees as it does to its customers. In other words, these companies realize that happy, knowledgeable employees will usually translate into happy, knowledgeable customers." Sound familiar? (I swear - and mea culpa, John - I had completely missed that post until now. Good to know we're all on the same page though. I feel all validated and stuff.) Here's more: "For example … The Container Store is a Dallas-based privately held company specializing in selling boxes, bins, and everything in-between to help consumers organize all their stuff. They have been highly successful with sales in 2005 topping $425 million with just 37 locations in 12 states. New Container Store employees are given more than 240 hours of training in their first year compared with the industry standard of 7 hours of training per new employee. Employees are paid two -to-three times more than the industry average. And employees are given a generous 40% discount for anything purchased at the Container Store. The company is renowned by retailers and customers as delivering great customer experiences which helps to explain why the company is so successful. With its focus on making the employee experience matter (tribal truth #33), The Container Store astonishes its employees who in turn, astonish its customers with great customer service.
  6. 6. Given this Container Store example, one sure-fire way to ensure the employee experience is aligned with the customer experience is to treat employees like you would want employees to treat customers. Sounds simple. But if it was so simple, more companies would be doing it ... right?" And why aren't they doing it? Mostly, because they just don't know any better. Because nobody told them.Because the concept of happy employees (and happy customers, for that matter) doesn't get much play when it comes to grown-up things like internal politics and maximizing shareholder return. That's changing, but not nearly fast enough. Yet. David Taylor (of the brilliantly named Where's The Sausage blog) picks up where John left off with his "brandwashing" concept: The whole are of "brand engagement" is booming, with companies launching into big and expensive initiatives to help employees "live the brand". However, in my experience many of these are a total and utter waste of money, as they fail to address the basics of making a company a nice place to work. Many of them are more like exercises in "brandwashing". Yeah. Pep rallies. "Go team" chants. "Brand Spirit" weeks. If you're a joiner, great. If, like me, you're a little more independent, good luck with that. The caffeine-induced exuberance, the forced propaganda and the attendance-required motivational meetings don't work. Thanks for trying though. Most of us are moderately intelligent, educated,well adjusted people. You aren't fooling anyone with your lame "let's talk about how awesome it is to work here in dingy cubicles for a fraction of what we should be making" meetings. Please spare us. And spare your employees. They aren't stupid. David continues: "One of the most successful companies at creating great and consistent customer service is sandwich shop chain Pret a Manger, and I wrote a little case on them for the new book, Brand Vision (out in Jan 07). This was inspired by the findings of an FT journalist who went to work at Pret to understand the secret of their success. And as you will see below, engaging people with the brand did not figure: 1. Managers are not over-qualified and embittered: - 75% of mangers are promoted from within - Other 25% have at least 2 years relevant experience - Join in and help instead of ‘barking orders’ 2. Staff are not ‘routinely humiliated’: - Smart uniform, not polyester nightmare - No dressing up for kiddie parties - Most stores have no toilets, so no cleaning of the loo
  7. 7. 3. Staff are paid well: - Team member: average £6.58 vs. £5.68 for competition - Team leader: average £8.39 vs. £7.52 for competition 4. Staff have a say in who joins: - Candidates work in store for a day and team votes whether to hire them. 5. Hire nice people: - Large number of well-educated international students The other really important thing is that the product people are selling is 10 times better than your average fast-food of course. It reminds me of the story of a kid working at McDonald's who when asked where he worked preferred to say he was unemployed! So let's see: Hire great people, treat them well, pay them well, give them the opportunity to move up if they so desire, make sure that they can be proud of the product they sell and the job they do, and let them have a say in who gets hired (or doesn't get hired). Is it really that hard? Really? Does it still make more sense to treat employees like a commodity and treat them like children when it comes to motivating them? Is it really so hard or expensive to be genuine and caring? Are those words really not part of the business lexicon? Cynicism is an ugly thing, and it has no place in business. None. One last question for you: If a company doesn't make the effort to treat its employees as well as it can, how do you think it will treat its customers? Good managers know that happy employees are loyal, productive employees. Below are seven areas to improve employee satisfaction. 528 inShare
  8. 8. Flickr Gretchen Rubin Today's Editor's Picks  My Conversation with Clinton  Web Makeover: Fixing a Retail Website  Is Your Whole Team in Sync?  Kony 2012: Making Video Go Viral  Declaring War on Fake FiveFingers Employee attitudes typically reflect the moral of the company. In areas of customer service and sales, happy employees are extremely important because they represent the company to the public. Satisfaction, however, is not linked solely to compensation. Sure, a raise or benefits will probably improve employee contentment, at least temporarily, but small, inexpensive changes can have a long-term impact. Zappos.com CEO Tony Hsieh's book Delivering Happinesssuggests that employers should follow the science of happiness. The book stresses the importance of happy employees. Since the publication of this New York Times Best Seller, Hsieh has expanded his message from to a bus tour to an entire movement. On her happiness project blog, Gretchen Rubin, author ofThe Happiness Project, identifies seven areas to improve happiness in the workplace. While employees can tweak their habits to improve happiness, employers can also make small changes to the seven categories. A little bit of effort can lead to happy, efficient, and loyal employees. 7 Ways to Improve Employee Satisfaction: Give Employees More Control "Happiness is affected by [employee's] sense of control over their lives," says Rubin. Employers should look for ways to give employees more control over their schedules,
  9. 9. environment, and/or work habits. For instance, employers could offer alternative work schedules such as flextime or telecommuting. Today's employees have demanding schedules outside of work, and many workers appreciate a boss who considers work-life balance. Because every person's obligations outside of work are different, customized schedules are a great way to improve employee satisfaction. Employers should also encourage employees to customize their workstations. This could include décor and/or equipment. This not only gives employees control over their work environments, but it can ease personal barriers such as back pain or eyestrain. In addition, studies show that certain colors or décor can improve happiness. Employees will be able to create a place they enjoy working in rather than being stuck in a bland office cubicle. Another way to give employees a sense of control is to create employee-driven competitions such as sales competitions. These activities put employees in control of their success. Each employee can set personal goals, and they will feel a sense of accomplishment rather than obligation. Dig Deeper: How To Implement a Four-Day Workweek 7 Ways to Improve Employee Satisfaction: Ease Commuting Stress According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 86.5% of workers over the age of 16 drive to work, whether carpooling or driving alone. "Bad commutes are a major source of unhappiness. People feel frustrated, powerless, and stressed," states Rubin. Employers should consider ways to decrease commuting stress. For instance, employers could stagger work times to avoid heavy traffic. Review beginning and ending times and determine if the specific times or the amount of people arriving at each time can be adjusted. In addition, review late arrival policies. If employees are severely reprimanded for arriving late, they will be much more stressed during a bad commute and will arrive at the office miserable. Another possibility is to offer telecommuting options. This eliminates the necessity of commuting and allows employees to work where they are most comfortable. Telecommuting also has a variety of benefits for the employer such as reduced costs The EES Questionnaire Content:
  10. 10. The standard Questionnaire contains 70 standard statements and is designed to enable bi-variate assessment. As such, each statement is assessed in terms of its: (1) Importance to "me" as an employee; and (2) Company's current performance The 70 statements can be categorized into 14 dimensions. They are: - Company Mission and Leadership - Communication - Corporate Culture - Compensation & Benefits - Quality Principles & Practices - Recognition & Rewards - Innovation & Change - Management Style - Performance Management - Teamwork & Co-operation - Climate - Training & Development - Role Clarity - Working Conditions (* Tailored questions can be added according to the company's need.)  The “All About Me Page”—see how easyit is for employees to navigate and view all of their personal information.  Workday′s powerful related actions icon.  The process ofrequesting time offand Workday's easy-to-use visual elements. CompanyMission& Leadership:Mymanagersensure thatIhave a clearunderstandingof my company’sgoalsanddirection;Seniormanagementpractice whattheypreachinrespectof the company’svisionormission. Corporate Culture:Peopleinthiscompanyare usuallyinvolvedinplanningchangeswhichwill affect theirjob.;Managersmake decisionsthatare consistentwithourcompanyvalues. QualityPrinciples&Practices:The company’sproceduresmake iteasyforusto produce quality customerservice.;We are regularlyinformedabouthow satisfiedourcustomersare with the qualityof goodsand serviceswe provide. Innovation&Change :Mymanagerconsultsusabout anynecessarychangestohow work isdone to improve qualityorservice tocustomers;WhenIhave goodideasmycompanymakesuse of them. Climate :Myjob makes gooduse of my skillsandabilities;Asaresultof the waythat I am treatedI intendtoworkfor thiscompanyfor the foreseeable future. Performance Management:The performance standardsformyjobare clearlydefined;Myperformance isassessedagainst organizational strategiesandcorporate values. Role Clarity:The rolesof people workingoncross-functional projectsare clearlydefined;My managementensuresthatIclearlyunderstandthe operatingproceduresinmyworkgroup.
  11. 11. Communication:Sufficienteffortismade togetthe opinionsandthoughtsof people atall levelswho workhere;WhenI raise a complaintwithmymanager,I believe itwillbe handledeffectively. Compensation&Benefits:Mypayis competitivewiththatof similarcompanies;Iamsatisfiedwiththe companybenefits. Recognition&Rewards:Highperformingstaff are noticedandrewardedinthiscompany;If Idoa good job,I knowI’ll be consideredwhenthe rightjobopportunitiesbecome available. ManagementStyle :Myimmediate superiorprovidessufficientsupportandguidance.Myimmediate superiorinvolvesme indecisionswhichaffectme. Teamwork& Co-operation:There isgoodteamworkandco-operationwithinmyworkgroup.;There is goodteamworkandco-operationbetweenmyworkgroupandothergroups inthe company. Training&Development:Ifeel thatopportunitiesforgrowthanddevelopmentare available tome;The trainingcoursesofferedbymycompanyare useful andeffective. WorkingConditions:The currentamountof overtime workinmyjobisreasonable.;My physical workingenvironment(e.g.temperature,ventilation,space towork,cleanlinessof workareas,etc.) is pleasant. Homework Help https://www.homeworkping.com/ Math homework help https://www.homeworkping.com/ Research Paper help https://www.homeworkping.com/ Algebra Help https://www.homeworkping.com/ Calculus Help https://www.homeworkping.com/ Accounting help
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