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Jessalynn Strauss. Exceeding Expectation: Social Responsibility in Gaming

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Jessalynn Strauss. Exceeding Expectation: Social Responsibility in Gaming

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Jessalynn Strauss. Exceeding Expectation: Social Responsibility in Gaming
Session 6B
Presented at the New Horizons in Responsible Gambling Conference in Vancouver, January 27-29, 2014

Jessalynn Strauss. Exceeding Expectation: Social Responsibility in Gaming
Session 6B
Presented at the New Horizons in Responsible Gambling Conference in Vancouver, January 27-29, 2014

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Jessalynn Strauss. Exceeding Expectation: Social Responsibility in Gaming

  1. 1. Exceeding Expectations: Social Responsibility in Gaming Dr. Jessalynn R. Strauss Elon University, USA @jrstrauss
  2. 2. My background Ph.D., Univ. of Oregon, 2010 Public relations, 
 social media marketing, 
 and corporate social responsibility in 
 Las Vegas, Nevada
  3. 3. My purpose: Introduce concepts from strategic communication/organization-side • Stakeholder theory • Moral and ethical obligations of business and corporations • Relationship management
  4. 4. Corporate social responsibility: “business and society are interwoven rather than distinct entities; therefore, society has certain expectations for appropriate business behavior and outcomes” (Wood, 1991)
  5. 5. Corporate social responsibility: “business and society are interwoven rather than distinct entities; therefore, society has certain expectations for appropriate business behavior and outcomes” (Wood, 1991)
  6. 6. Corporate social responsibility: “business and society are interwoven rather than distinct entities; therefore, society has certain expectations for appropriate business behavior and outcomes” (Wood, 1991)
  7. 7. Corporate social responsibility: “business and society are interwoven rather than distinct entities; therefore, society has certain expectations for appropriate business behavior and outcomes” (Wood, 1991)
  8. 8. 1. Business and society are interwoven rather than distinct entities
  9. 9. Milton
 Friedman “The business of business is business”
  10. 10. 2. Society has certain expectations...
  11. 11. SOCIETY
  12. 12. EMPLOYEES CUSTOMERS COMMUNITY SUPPLIERS ENVIRONMENT
  13. 13. EMPLOYEES CUSTOMERS COMMUNITY SUPPLIERS ENVIRONMENT
  14. 14. EMPLOYEES CUSTOMERS COMMUNITY SUPPLIERS ENVIRONMENT
  15. 15. SOCIETY
  16. 16. EMPLOYEES CUSTOMERS COMMUNITY SUPPLIERS ENVIRONMENT
  17. 17. CUSTOMERS EMPLOYEES COMMUNITY SUPPLIERS ENVIRONMENT
  18. 18. Fair wages • Safe working conditions • Opportunities for advancement • EMPLOYEES CUSTOMERS COMMUNITY SUPPLIERS ENVIRONMENT
  19. 19. EMPLOYEES CUSTOMERS COMMUNITY SUPPLIERS ENVIRONMENT
  20. 20. What to do with stakeholders? • Assess perceptions and (dis)satisfaction • • Dialogue Enhance/repair relationships • • • Communication Action Prioritize/balance based on duties and obligations
  21. 21. What can stakeholders do for you? • Affect reputation, legitimacy • Lower (or raise) transaction costs • Buy (or boycott) your product • Pressure you to act in a socially responsible way
  22. 22. 3. ...for appropriate business behavior and outcomes
  23. 23. Immanuel Kant Behavior vs. outcomes John Stuart Mill
  24. 24. Philosophical duties/obligations (Ross) • Non-injury • Beneficence • Gratitude • Fidelity • Justice
  25. 25. What is “acceptable”? Behavior Outcomes • Good management • Financially successful • Attempt to address negative externalities (problem gambling) • No negative impact on stakeholders • Support the community • Jobs • Nonprofits • Engaged corporate citizen
  26. 26. 1. Who are our stakeholders? 2. What are our duties to these stakeholders? 3. What outcomes are we obligated to guarantee for them?
  27. 27. Relationship management theory
  28. 28. Antecedents Antecedents Antecedents
  29. 29. Antecedents Antecedents Antecedents Cultivation strategies
  30. 30. Antecedents Outcomes Antecedents Cultivation strategies Outcomes Outcomes Antecedents
  31. 31. An example: labour relations Cultivation
 Strategies Antecedent • • • Employees are dependent on organization Jobs may be scarce Power dynamic (Desired)
 Outcomes • Dialogue • Satisfaction • Establish trust • Low turnover • Task-sharing • • Assurances Reduced transaction costs • Openness • Positive goodwill For more on cultivation strategies, see Ki and Hon (1999), 
 “A Measure of Relationship Cultivation Strategies”
  32. 32. Takeaway messages • • • Consider all stakeholders, not just customers/society Consider whether an act itself is ethical AND whether it produces an ethical outcome Analyze relationships and communicate accordingly with stakeholder groups
  33. 33. Questions? jstrauss2@elon.edu

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