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Microsoft Kinect as a
stroke rehabilitation tool
for patients suffering
from facial paralysis
Adam Russell
Philip Breedon
...
1. Kinect camera
20 x 30

640 x 480 pixels

100 x 120 pixels
2. Product design
Pip
Logan

Michael
Vloeberghs

Becca
O’Brien

Darrin
Baines

Carolyn
Fletcher

(Speech + Language Therapy)

Ossie
Newell

...
3. “Gamification”
Chris Hecker (2010) Achievements Considered Harmful?
For interesting tasks…
Verbal, Unexpected,
Informational Feedback
Inc...
Chris Hecker’s Self-Fulfilling Nightmare
1. make an intrinsically interesting
game task, congratulations!
2. use extrinsic...
“The day when a sportsman stops
thinking above all else of the happiness
in his own effort and the intoxication of
the pow...
“amidst all this confusion, we’re losing
sight of the question of what would
happen if we really did apply the deeper
powe...
Thanks!

Adam Russell
adam.russell@ntu.ac.uk
Design for Health & Wellbeing, NTU
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.
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Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.

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Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis. by Phillip Breedon,
Adam Russell and Carolyn Fletcher

Publié dans : Santé & Médecine, Business
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Microsoft 'Kinect' as a Stroke Rehabilitation tool for Patients suffering from Facial Paralysis.

  1. 1. Microsoft Kinect as a stroke rehabilitation tool for patients suffering from facial paralysis Adam Russell Philip Breedon Carolyn Fletcher Nottingham Trent University
  2. 2. 1. Kinect camera
  3. 3. 20 x 30 640 x 480 pixels 100 x 120 pixels
  4. 4. 2. Product design
  5. 5. Pip Logan Michael Vloeberghs Becca O’Brien Darrin Baines Carolyn Fletcher (Speech + Language Therapy) Ossie Newell Phil Breedon Adam Russell Patrick Hall Oliver Bishop Ben Childs
  6. 6. 3. “Gamification”
  7. 7. Chris Hecker (2010) Achievements Considered Harmful? For interesting tasks… Verbal, Unexpected, Informational Feedback Increases Free-Choice IM Tangible, Expected, Contingent Rewards Reduces Free-Choice IM
  8. 8. Chris Hecker’s Self-Fulfilling Nightmare 1. make an intrinsically interesting game task, congratulations! 2. use extrinsic motivators to make your game task better 3. destroy intrinsic motivation to play your game task 4. metrics fetishism pushes you towards designs where EM works
  9. 9. “The day when a sportsman stops thinking above all else of the happiness in his own effort and the intoxication of the power and physical balance he derives from it, the day when he lets considerations of vanity or interest take over, on this day his ideal will die.” Pierre de Coubertin (1863-1937)
  10. 10. “amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly.” Margaret Robertson (2010) Hideandseek.net
  11. 11. Thanks! Adam Russell adam.russell@ntu.ac.uk Design for Health & Wellbeing, NTU

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