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P1121138815

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P1121138815

  1. 1. Visual Simplified Characters’ Emotion Emulator Implementing OCC Model Ana Lilia Laureano-Cruces1,2,3 Laura Hernández-Domínguez2 Martha Mora-Torres2 Juan Manuel Torres Moreno3 Jaime Cabrera-López2 • Departamento de Sistemas, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana -Azcapotzalco • Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación, UNAM, México • Université d'Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, France
  2. 2. Visual Simplified Characters’ Emotion Emulator (EVE) •This system was designed so that the user can create emotional and affective environments in real time, particulary in stories. •With EVE, the user can design: •The characters that take part in the story •The agents' interpersonal affective relationships •The agents' possible actions •The possible events that may occur during the story •The objects (goals, desires, attractive or repulsive manifestations)
  3. 3. Design of Agents I •Agents are restricted to human characters. •The system can hold 2, 3 or 4 different characters. •Users can characterize the agents (change their hairstyle, haircolor, eyewear and name) in order to better represent the character.
  4. 4. Design of Agents II
  5. 5. Design of Agents III •Users can also define the affective relationships between the agents. •Range of values corresponding to affection: o From -5 (total hatred) o Passing through 0 (indifference) o Up to +5 (unconditional love/friendship)
  6. 6. Design of Agents IV
  7. 7. Design of Events I •EVE sees events as things that happen in the course of a story, but are not direct consequences of the agents’ actions. EVE allows the user to set a name for each event. •Range of values corresponding to the level of desirability of the events: o From -5 (very undesirable) o Passing through 0 (indifference) o Up to +5 (very desirable)
  8. 8. Design of Events II •NOTE: for EVE, the level of desirability of an event is the same for everyone.
  9. 9. Design of Objects •Objects are elements of the world that may be material (money, a house) or immaterial (goals, desires, abstractions). They are named and given a level of appeal or appeal by users. •Range of values corresponding to the level of desirability of the objects: o From -5 (a very repulsive object) o Passing through 0 (indifference) o Up to +5 (a fascinating object)
  10. 10. Design of Actions I •Actions are defined as acts that are available for any of the agents to perform. They are named and given a level of plausibility by users. •Range of values corresponding to the level of plausibility of the actions: o From -5 (a highly censurable action) o Passing through 0 (indifference) o Up to +5 (a praiseworthy action)
  11. 11. The Emotional Map I •Having designed the agents, events, objects and actions, EVE shows a general map of the actual emotions of each of the characters that have been designed, the relationships between the characters, and the chances for realization of events, objects, and actions. This is the environment in which the story will take place.
  12. 12. The Emotional Map II Emotional status indicator for each character towards this particular character List of possible events that may occur during the story Character selectors Displays a list of possible objects to be gained or actions to be done by the characters. Emotional links between characters
  13. 13. Emotions Considered by EVE I •Humans are able to feel a very wide variety of emotions. EVE restricts every character to feel only happiness, anger, and pride. •Since a negative value on happiness is consider as sadness and, as well, a nagative value on pride may be consider as shame, EVE is cpable of managing five different kinds of emotions.
  14. 14. Emotions Considered by EVE II •An emotion felt previously can alter the intensity with which a given character experiences a new emotion, thereby presenting conflicting feelings. •If a character feels a certain emotion at a moment, this emotion does not disapear or vary unless an event, action or object takes place and alters the previous emotion.
  15. 15. Emotions Considered by EVE III •To make it clearer: imagine there is a character whose beloved one has recently died; this character will be really devastated. Now, imagine this character receives a priceless gift, this character's happiness for receiving the gift will be limited by the sadness of having lost a beloved one. In other words, the character won't be 100% happy.
  16. 16. Happiness •Happiness in facts represents two emotions: happiness and sadness. The range considered for this emotion is from -5 (distress), passing through 0 (neutrality) to +5 (euphoria). These are the faces depicting each of the emotions on this ranking:
  17. 17. Anger •Anger is an emotion with a range of values varying from 0 (calm) to 5 (rage). There are no negative values for this emotion. •Here can be seen the graphic representation for the different levels of anger:
  18. 18. Pride •Pride represents two emotions: pride and shame. The range considered for this emotion is from -5 (shame), passing through 0 (neutrality) to +5 (pride). These are the faces depicting each of the values of pride:
  19. 19. Affective Relationships •The possible levels of affective links that may exist between the characters in a story vary from -5 (hatred), passing through 0 (indifference) to +5 (unconditional love/friendship). Affective relationships among characters also have a visual representation:
  20. 20. •We show a series of possible scenarios which allow us to visualize some of the emotional reactions of the characters in the story of Othello in response to certain events. Possible Scenarios NOTE: These scenarios were designed only to exemplify; any story can be designed differently based on the user’s interpretation.
  21. 21. Visual design for each character in Othello.
  22. 22. Affective Relationships Between Characters in Othello •
  23. 23. Emotions Triggered by Events I •Suppose that at the beggining of the story (every character's emotional situation is neutral -value 0-) Desdemona suffers a misfortune (an event with as desirability value of -5), such as her father gets angry with her and opposes her marrying Othello.
  24. 24. Emotions Triggered by Events II •Predictably, Desdemona feels very sad for her own missfortune.
  25. 25. Emotions Triggered by Events II •Othello, who is deeply in love with Desdemona, feels very sad for her fate.
  26. 26. Emotions Triggered by Events II •Iago dislikes Desdemona, so he feels happy for her misfortune.
  27. 27. Emotions Triggered by Events II •Rodrigo, who as Othello is in love with Desdemona, feels deeply sad for her.
  28. 28. Emotions Triggered by Objects I •Imagine now a scenario in which an object of desire is in play, as it occurs in the emotional map obtained when Rodrigo receives the rank of lieutenant.
  29. 29. Emotions Triggered by Objects II •Rodrigo feels very proud and his happiness increases too for having gotten the new rank of lieutenant.
  30. 30. Emotions Triggered by Objects II •Othello, who appreciates Rodrigo, feels a bit happy and proud for him.
  31. 31. Emotions Triggered by Objects II •Desdemona, who loves Rodrigo feels really happy and proud for him.
  32. 32. Emotions Triggered by Objects II •Iago, who hates Rodrigo feels deeply sad and angry for his fortune, and for not having been able to get the new rank himself.
  33. 33. Emotions Triggered by the Characters’ Actions I •Actions involve two characters: 1.The character performing the action. 2.The character affected by that action. •To ilustrate this, imagine that Iago performs a highly censurable action toward Othello: betrayal.
  34. 34. Emotions Triggered by the Characters’ Actions I •Othello feels sad for Iago's betrayal, but he also feels angry at him and feels shame for his friend's censurable action.
  35. 35. Emotions Triggered by the Characters’ Actions I •Desdemona feels deeply sad for Othello's suffering, but also very angry at Iago for his action towards her beloved one.
  36. 36. Emotions Triggered by the Characters’ Actions I •Rodrigo feels sad for Othello's suffering, but he also gets angry at Iago for his censurable action towards his friend.
  37. 37. Emotions Triggered by the Characters’ Actions I •Since Iago hates Othello, he feels very happy for Othello's distress.
  38. 38. The Logic of the System I •The interpretation of the resulting emotion in response to an event, object, or action is based on matrices of quantitative reactions with interpretative values. •The matrices have been filled in by the development team based on their personal experiences.
  39. 39. The Logic of the System II •Eight matrices of quantitative reactions were generated: •1 to account for characters’ feelings toward events (happiness) •3 for reactions to objects (shame-pride, sadness- happiness, and anger) •1 matrix for happiness in the person affected by actions •3 for emotional reactions toward the perpetrator of an action (shame-pride, anger, and sadness-happiness).
  40. 40. The Logic of the System III •Rows represent the emotional level of the character reacting to the character, to whom the event occurs. •Columns represent the desirability of the event.
  41. 41. Example: matrix of characters’ quantitative reactions to events
  42. 42. •Thus, the quadrant of the matrix shaded light gray represents the section of ill will, where a misfortune produces the maximum increase in happiness for the person who loathes the person affected by that event. • In contrast, the quadrant shaded dark gray represents feelings of good will, meaning that a character is cheered by another character’s good fortune
  43. 43. Conclusions •This paper lays the foundation for analysis of characters’ emotional reactions in stories, and may also help to improve interpretations of users’ emotional states or in developing interfaces in which stories take place, such as automatic generation of stories and development of videogames. •The OCC cognitive theory of emotions, is a methodology used to evaluate the possible emotion from the cognitive point of view. Because this methodology is clear, precise and free of context has been used frequently in the synthesis of emotions by computer •This paper is a simplification of the OCC Model, but can be enriched with aspects that allow for modification of characters’ initial emotional states, through interpersonal relationships, in order to consider in stories variants of intensity of feelings that often change over the course of a story.
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