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Empowering the Decision
Maker:
How Women Influence Decision-
Making in Cancer Care
NAACDO PAN - 2015
• Review the impact that women have in healthcare
decision making
• Understand what research has shown to appeal to women
...
About Gelb
WE WORK WITH NATIONALLY-RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS:
5 “Honor Roll” institutions
5 out of the top 10 cancer program...
Presenters
John McKeever
Executive Vice President
Gelb Consulting,
An Endeavor
Management Company
Nicole Coy
Practice Lead...
Starting Points…
PAGE 7
Stereotyping…
PAGE 8
We are Wired to Think Differently
Source: University of California, Irvine “Intelligence In Men And Women Is A Gray...
PAGE 9
We are Wired to Make Decisions Differently
Numerous studies have shown that during decision making, women are more
...
PAGE 10
So What’s New?
• The majority of the online
market
• A wide range of influential
positions in the workplace
• A si...
PAGE 11
Changing Roles
Direct Users
Family Decision Makers
Community Influencers
Donors
Insurance Plan
Influencers
PAGE 12
% of women who make healthcare appointments for their family
Take a guess…
PAGE 13
Of women make healthcare
appointments for their family
Women as Family Decision Makers & Influencers
80%
PAGE 14
% of women who take their children to doctor appointments
% of women who select their child’s doctors
Take a guess…
PAGE 15
Of women take their children
to doctor appointments
Women as Family Decision Makers & Influencers
84%
Of women sel...
PAGE 16
% of family care givers who are women…
Take a guess…
PAGE 17
Of family care givers are women
Women as Family Decision Makers & Influencers
Female caregivers who are family mem...
PAGE 18
Women as HR managers and donors
51%
71%
Of today’s HR managers who
guide or make decisions about
insurance plans a...
PAGE 19
Evolution of a new role…
Many healthcare experts believe
that consumers – particularly
women – are evolving to bec...
PAGE 20
Online
Communities
of women share health-related information via Facebook
of women forward health information or a...
PAGE 21
Women's Realities Today
There is not just one “women’s market”
• Life milestones are much more varied
• Pragmatic ...
PAGE 22
Emerging Themes
Bombarded with health
information, but unsure which
information to trust
Only 65% trust their PCP ...
PAGE 23
Oncology Relevance
Healthcare – especially oncology – is inherently different from
most purchasing decisions
• We ...
PAGE 24
Usage of Oncology Services
Source: American Cancer Society
• Compared to men, women
use more cancer preventative
s...
PAGE 26
Thinking Beyond Pink
Mistakes to avoid:
• Assuming all women need is a color, font or
sweet story that appeals to ...
PAGE 27
Products “for her”
PAGE 28
What Women Want
 A healthcare brand that they perceive as
trustworthy
 Confidence that they are receiving the hi...
PAGE 29
• Develop brand trust early
• Arm your marketing efforts with information (data)
• Move beyond satisfaction to adv...
PAGE 30
Develop Brand Trust
Develop brand trust early in the healthcare experience –
even before oncology needs develop
 ...
PAGE 31
Connect During Life Stages
Spirit of Women partners with hospitals to provide education, screenings,
health tips e...
PAGE 32
Become a Trusted Online Resource
MyLifeStages by Sutter Health is an award-winning health program that pulls toget...
PAGE 33
Personalize Physician Marketing
A few ideas:
• Create engaging physician
profiles
• Write bios in first person
• U...
PAGE 34
Engage through Social Media
Practical Tips:
 Focus on building connections
 Show that you are paying attention
t...
PAGE 35
Arm Efforts with Information2
 Follow data, not assumptions
 Seek the stories behind the
numbers
 Consider a va...
PAGE 36
Consider a Variety of Data Gathering Tools
Referring Physicians are Critical
Most cancer patients are “assisted
ch...
PAGE 37
Look to Alternative Methods
Methods Advantages Disadvantages
Observational Very inexpensive
“Real-time” insights
N...
PAGE 38
Create Advocates
Move beyond satisfaction scores – focus on creating
advocates
 Consider functional (what we do) ...
FUNCTIONAL
EMOTIONAL
Cancer Patient Experience Map
Scheduling First Visit Treatment Follow-upNeed
Initial cancer diagnosis
Perceptions about pr...
PAGE 43
Functional
Understanding Needs
Emotional
PAGE 46
Identifiable Personas
Segment Name Appeal Size
Handle with Care High 12%
OB Driven
High, with OB
affiliation
16%
S...
PAGE 48
Translating Feedback into Customer Experience
 Placed patient safety and quality of
care at the center of design ...
PAGE 51
Oncology Patient Decision Process
Awareness
Decision
Making
Experience Communications
PhysicianFacility
• Previous...
PAGE 52
Embrace Differences
 Acknowledge multiple, varying roles of
today’s woman
 Avoid stereotypes or being patronizin...
PAGE 53
Use Differences to Empower
A few best practices:
 Highlight diverse women role models (for consumers and internal...
PAGE 54
Example –
Embracing Life Stages, Diverse Roles
4
PAGE 55
Expand Your Focus
 Appealing to women doesn’t mean alienating mean
 Include information about men’s preventative...
PAGE 56
Consider Appealing to Women in Marketing Men’s
Services
• Prostate Clinic in California
created marketing material...
PAGE 57
Value Authenticity6
 Focus on connectedness and benefit
for all
 Don’t be afraid to have fun – but use
humor foc...
PAGE 58
Example – Humor that appeals to women6
THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING
QUESTIONS ?
COMMENTS ?
Resources
Contact Info
John McKeever and Nicole Coy
Gelb Consulting Group
800-846-4051
jmckeever@endeavormgmt.com
ncoy@endeavormgmt....
RESOURCES
Red Zone Management
The Playbook for today’s troubled business
environment…when all businesses find
themselves in the Red ...
Dashboard Solutions
Marketing 360
http://vimeo.com/114726829
Physicians 360
http://vimeo.com/112767931
Patients 360
http:/...
Physician Relations Resources
Referring physician experience
management overview
Ohio State University Medical Center
Clev...
Patient Experience Resources
University of Michigan Health System
MD Anderson
Linking Marketing and Operations
2012 Benchm...
Brand and Marketing Resources
Healthcare Brands
Marketing in the Era of Health Reform
Healthcare Marketing Strategy
Froedt...
Patients ReferrersInternal
• Conducting weekly meetings between faculty
and service staff
• Enhancing the role of voluntee...
Strategic Priority
Links to Clinical
Excellence
Competitive Advantage
Source: Gelb/APQC/Beryl Institute Benchmarking Study...
Source: Gelb Consulting Benchmarking survey
Physician Experience Maturity
• Mobile
appointment
status updates
• Suggestions for
activities,
restaurants ,rest
areas, quiet areas.
• Self Service/Rea...
Our Team Leaders
John McKeever, MBA, Executive Vice President
• Nationally recognized expert in healthcare strategy,
parti...
Endeavor Management is a management consulting firm that leads
clients to achieve real value from their strategic transfor...
Empowering the True Healthcare Decision Makers – Women
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Empowering the True Healthcare Decision Makers – Women

We share several critical data in this presentation to make the case that women have now transformed the healthcare decision making landscape – they are not just family decision makers, but influencers of broader communities. Here’s what healthcare marketers need to know.

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Empowering the True Healthcare Decision Makers – Women

  1. 1. Empowering the Decision Maker: How Women Influence Decision- Making in Cancer Care NAACDO PAN - 2015
  2. 2. • Review the impact that women have in healthcare decision making • Understand what research has shown to appeal to women in today’s culture in relation to marketing influence and decision-making empowerment • Provide practical examples, ideas and tips for appealing to women in cancer-related marketing and communication Objectives
  3. 3. About Gelb WE WORK WITH NATIONALLY-RECOGNIZED INSTITUTIONS: 5 “Honor Roll” institutions 5 out of the top 10 cancer programs 3 out of the top 4 pediatric hospitals 3 out of the top 10 cardiovascular programs NATIONAL BENCHMARKING STUDIES: Patient experience management Marketing practices Physician relations programs International programs Ranked as one of top 50 Healthcare Consulting firms by Modern Healthcare Selected Clients Barnes-Jewish Hospital Boston Children’s Hospital Cleveland Clinic Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Duke Medicine Froedtert Health Mayo Clinic MD Anderson Cancer Center Memorial Sloan Kettering Menninger Clinic Texas Children’s Hospital The Ohio State University Medical Center University of Chicago Medicine University of Colorado Health University of Michigan Health System
  4. 4. Presenters John McKeever Executive Vice President Gelb Consulting, An Endeavor Management Company Nicole Coy Practice Lead, Customer Experience Gelb Consulting, An Endeavor Management Company
  5. 5. Starting Points…
  6. 6. PAGE 7 Stereotyping…
  7. 7. PAGE 8 We are Wired to Think Differently Source: University of California, Irvine “Intelligence In Men And Women Is A Gray and White Matter” “Human evolution has created two different types of brains designed for equally intelligent behavior” – UCI researcher Richard Haier Men have 6X the amount of grey brain matter – which relates to information processing. Women have 10X the amount of white brain matter – which relates to connections between processing centers. As such, men tend to excel at localized processing (i.e. mathematics) while women tend to excel at integrating and assimilating information (i.e. language skills).
  8. 8. PAGE 9 We are Wired to Make Decisions Differently Numerous studies have shown that during decision making, women are more likely than men to:  Use a collaborative approach  Ask many questions  Consider a wide set of solutions  Think carefully under stress (men are more likely to take risks under stress) In the corporate world, having women involved in decision-making makes the organization statistically more effective and profitable
  9. 9. PAGE 10 So What’s New? • The majority of the online market • A wide range of influential positions in the workplace • A significant source of untapped wealth Today’s Women Represent: How this Impacts Us: • Influence is moving beyond the family • Expectations and demands are increasing • Potential for influence is greater than ever Women have been dominating healthcare decision- making for their families for decades.
  10. 10. PAGE 11 Changing Roles Direct Users Family Decision Makers Community Influencers Donors Insurance Plan Influencers
  11. 11. PAGE 12 % of women who make healthcare appointments for their family Take a guess…
  12. 12. PAGE 13 Of women make healthcare appointments for their family Women as Family Decision Makers & Influencers 80%
  13. 13. PAGE 14 % of women who take their children to doctor appointments % of women who select their child’s doctors Take a guess…
  14. 14. PAGE 15 Of women take their children to doctor appointments Women as Family Decision Makers & Influencers 84% Of women select their child’s doctors85% …And 94% of working mothers report making healthcare decisions for others in their family
  15. 15. PAGE 16 % of family care givers who are women… Take a guess…
  16. 16. PAGE 17 Of family care givers are women Women as Family Decision Makers & Influencers Female caregivers who are family members spend about 50% more time providing care than male caregivers 66%
  17. 17. PAGE 18 Women as HR managers and donors 51% 71% Of today’s HR managers who guide or make decisions about insurance plans are women Of private wealth in the US is controlled by women Women are the largest untapped door source – with Gen X women (born in the 60’s-80’s) being identified by many as the future of philanthropy
  18. 18. PAGE 19 Evolution of a new role… Many healthcare experts believe that consumers – particularly women – are evolving to become your brand managers. What is the key factor that has made this evolution possible?
  19. 19. PAGE 20 Online Communities of women share health-related information via Facebook of women forward health information or articles to others of women share health-related information via email of women in their 20’s and 30’s use online or social media to search for healthcare information 84% 69% 75% 90%
  20. 20. PAGE 21 Women's Realities Today There is not just one “women’s market” • Life milestones are much more varied • Pragmatic needs are core drivers – much more than marketers usually realize - particularly convenience, finances and quality • Healthcare consumers as a whole are becoming more educated, demanding and willing to seek information/second opinions on their own • They are increasingly starved for time – with about 1/3 reporting that they lack the time to stay healthy (about 1/4 for women with children under 18)
  21. 21. PAGE 22 Emerging Themes Bombarded with health information, but unsure which information to trust Only 65% trust their PCP and very few trust insurance or pharmaceutical companies Allow themselves to trust in providers who foster dialogue and communication Neglect their own wellness due to lack of time (especially those who have children under 18) Believe that health is much more than medical needs Value being spiritually and emotionally healthy, physically fit and well- rested TRUST WELLNESS Source: Center for Talent Innovation, “Engaging Women Decision Makers for Healthy Outcomes”
  22. 22. PAGE 23 Oncology Relevance Healthcare – especially oncology – is inherently different from most purchasing decisions • We don’t want to need oncology services • Diagnosis is a stressful time – it is common to act and make decisions differently than normal • It is difficult for non-healthcare consumers to evaluate quality – a top driver for oncology decision-making • Time may not allow for extensive research • “The perfect decision” may not be possible due to insurance coverage, travel requirements, appointment availability, etc. “I’m normally an information seeker but when I heard “cancer” I shut down. I only wanted to hear what [my hospital] had to say about my treatment” – Focus Group Participant
  23. 23. PAGE 24 Usage of Oncology Services Source: American Cancer Society • Compared to men, women use more cancer preventative services. • Men continue to have higher numbers of death due to cancer in comparison to women – although the divide is shrinking as overall deaths from cancer decrease.
  24. 24. PAGE 26 Thinking Beyond Pink Mistakes to avoid: • Assuming all women need is a color, font or sweet story that appeals to them • Generalizations that all women think alike, go through the same life milestones and can be reached in the same way • Neglecting to understand cultural and generational differences among women in your target market • Appealing to women only when promoting women’s oncology service lines (and assuming that marketing to women will alienate men) • Ignoring the new realities of women
  25. 25. PAGE 27 Products “for her”
  26. 26. PAGE 28 What Women Want  A healthcare brand that they perceive as trustworthy  Confidence that they are receiving the highest quality care and treatment  A convenient and easy process, respectful of their time  A personalized experience that provides hope and inspiration
  27. 27. PAGE 29 • Develop brand trust early • Arm your marketing efforts with information (data) • Move beyond satisfaction to advocacy • Embrace differences • Expand your focus • Be authentic – but not afraid to have fun 1 2 3 4 5 6 Practical Tips
  28. 28. PAGE 30 Develop Brand Trust Develop brand trust early in the healthcare experience – even before oncology needs develop  Focus on health partnership during a variety of life stages, including prevention and ongoing wellness post-treatment  Market providers in a way that develops personal connections  Strengthen leadership position via social media and brand recognition in the community 1
  29. 29. PAGE 31 Connect During Life Stages Spirit of Women partners with hospitals to provide education, screenings, health tips etc. that are focused to women
  30. 30. PAGE 32 Become a Trusted Online Resource MyLifeStages by Sutter Health is an award-winning health program that pulls together local health resources and online technology. It includes area physicians who answer questions and post blogs
  31. 31. PAGE 33 Personalize Physician Marketing A few ideas: • Create engaging physician profiles • Write bios in first person • Use video • Feature blogs, community forums or Q&A sessions via social media In what other ways have you found success in marketing your providers?
  32. 32. PAGE 34 Engage through Social Media Practical Tips:  Focus on building connections  Show that you are paying attention through responding to them (don’t abandon a social media channel!)  Use empowering language, relatable stories  Be authentic, honest and transparent (if you make a mistake, correct it and keep going!)  Overwhelmed? Look to industry resources for help and guidelines
  33. 33. PAGE 35 Arm Efforts with Information2  Follow data, not assumptions  Seek the stories behind the numbers  Consider a variety of tools for eliciting feedback  Segmentation is your ally  Go beyond demographics to develop psychographic profiles
  34. 34. PAGE 36 Consider a Variety of Data Gathering Tools Referring Physicians are Critical Most cancer patients are “assisted choosers” – seeking advice from their physicians while also conducting their own research Reputation, Experience are Key Reputation of physicians and for patient care, along with experience with specific treatments or conditions, are top motivators for selecting a cancer provider Referrals, Online are Promoters Most frequently used information sources for making a decision are others who working healthcare, friends/family and online sources – particularly the provider’s website Decision Factors Research Referring Physician Experience Mapping Blitz User Testing Oncology Patient Panels Advertising Concept Testing What we have learned: Tools to consider:
  35. 35. PAGE 37 Look to Alternative Methods Methods Advantages Disadvantages Observational Very inexpensive “Real-time” insights Not projectable Typically not interactive Training ideal Qualitative Dynamic Ability to probe Capture “stories” Easy internal deployment Variable by individual/group Not projectable As size of group increases, so does required skill set Quantitative Projectable Analyzes drivers Capture “data” for trending Most expensive Limited by timing / your scope Real-time Service recovery Captures “data” for trending Process refinement Requires system for deployment
  36. 36. PAGE 38 Create Advocates Move beyond satisfaction scores – focus on creating advocates  Consider functional (what we do) and emotional (how we do it) needs  Create authentic opportunities for engagement (if you ask for real-time feedback, you must take action or respond)  Provide opportunities to build a long-term relationship  Invest time and effort to understand what they want 3
  37. 37. FUNCTIONAL EMOTIONAL
  38. 38. Cancer Patient Experience Map Scheduling First Visit Treatment Follow-upNeed Initial cancer diagnosis Perceptions about provider Awareness of provider and oncology program Evaluating and selecting a provider Contacting the provider or oncology center Scheduling first visit Financial and medical paperwork/records Organizing accommodations/travel Additional lab or diagnostic testing Reoccurring appointments and treatments Surgery and inpatient care Nursing, tech and physician care Support services Completion of treatment Treatment for additional conditions Call-backs for assistance Communication with referring physician regarding progress Follow-up visits and coordination of follow-up care Getting to center - parking and navigation Checking-in and waiting area Discussion of treatment plan, clinical trials and preparation for what to expect Interactions with staff and providers Patient and family education • Referring Physicians • Family and Friends • Internet Research • Advertisements • Front Desk Staff • Call Center • Faculty/Medical Staff • Faculty/Medical Staff • Support Staff • Faculty/Medical Staff • Support Staff • Faculty/Medical Staff • Support Staff • Patient’s primary/referring physician Key Touchpoints Key Touchpoints
  39. 39. PAGE 43 Functional Understanding Needs Emotional
  40. 40. PAGE 46 Identifiable Personas Segment Name Appeal Size Handle with Care High 12% OB Driven High, with OB affiliation 16% Support Seekers Moderate, with persuasive communications 9% In Control Moderate 12%
  41. 41. PAGE 48 Translating Feedback into Customer Experience  Placed patient safety and quality of care at the center of design and operations  Created specific areas to enhance the family bonding experience and promote family-centered care throughout the facility  Crafted calming, joyful environments  Studied traffic flow and way finding to enhance site and building navigation  Analyzed operational models to focus on family-centered care and customer service
  42. 42. PAGE 51 Oncology Patient Decision Process Awareness Decision Making Experience Communications PhysicianFacility • Previous Experience • Reputation • Recommendation from Others • Recommendation from Others • Online Research Referring Physician Online Research Friends and Family Questions to Consider… • Can local providers closer to home mange it just as successfully? • Will my treatment options be the same regardless of where we go? Motivating Factors for Selecting Provider
  43. 43. PAGE 52 Embrace Differences  Acknowledge multiple, varying roles of today’s woman  Avoid stereotypes or being patronizing  Seek to understand and embrace the cultural needs  Consider needs related to language, religion, race, life stage, etc. 4
  44. 44. PAGE 53 Use Differences to Empower A few best practices:  Highlight diverse women role models (for consumers and internal audiences) – seek those who are trusted, respected and active in their commitment to supporting other women  Look beyond the longstanding tradition of seeing work and life as two different things – find opportunities to bring family, community and work together as an integrated system  Designate a champion – a senior leader, ideally a man (the person championing diversity change should be the opposite to the change)  Resist the temptation to only include women in initiatives to reach out to women – this leads to alienation rather than collaborative team work
  45. 45. PAGE 54 Example – Embracing Life Stages, Diverse Roles 4
  46. 46. PAGE 55 Expand Your Focus  Appealing to women doesn’t mean alienating mean  Include information about men’s preventative care in healthcare educational information aimed for women  Appeal to women’s core needs when promoting men's services  As a marketer, avoid the traditional traps (“I get it because I am a woman” or “I can’t get it because I am a man”). Keep in mind that we are experts – we can navigate healthcare much easier than most consumers 5
  47. 47. PAGE 56 Consider Appealing to Women in Marketing Men’s Services • Prostate Clinic in California created marketing materials that addressed men directly, but appeal to women by drawing differences between breast cancer and prostate cancer. • REX UNC Healthcare featured a prostate ad aiming at both males and females – emphasizing the impact on the wives, daughters, moms and sisters of men who have prostate cancer
  48. 48. PAGE 57 Value Authenticity6  Focus on connectedness and benefit for all  Don’t be afraid to have fun – but use humor focused on community and family (avoid competitiveness or degrading)  Create opportunities for relationship- building and engagement  Feature real, diverse women  Provide avenues for women to advocate for your brand
  49. 49. PAGE 58 Example – Humor that appeals to women6
  50. 50. THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING QUESTIONS ? COMMENTS ?
  51. 51. Resources
  52. 52. Contact Info John McKeever and Nicole Coy Gelb Consulting Group 800-846-4051 jmckeever@endeavormgmt.com ncoy@endeavormgmt.com
  53. 53. RESOURCES
  54. 54. Red Zone Management The Playbook for today’s troubled business environment…when all businesses find themselves in the Red Zone. The Principles of Red Zone Management clearly spell out the proven management roadmap for making changes during these turbulent times. Change is the Rule This book is considered by many to be the most useful and practical explanation of how changes are managed in the modern organization. Thought Revolution Demonstrates how to tap into the right brain – the place where intuition and creativity exist – in a simple, easy and dramatic fashion. Change Management Toolkit Purchased by more than 200 firms for use in guiding their Change Management projects. Including detailed, proven and tested tools and templates to ensure change success. The Complete Guide to Women’s Health Service Line Marketing Written by affiliate Mary Ann Graf, this is THE handbook on how to organize marketing efforts for clinical service lines. Chapter 7 features our extensive work with Texas Children’s Hospital. Our Thought Leadership
  55. 55. Dashboard Solutions Marketing 360 http://vimeo.com/114726829 Physicians 360 http://vimeo.com/112767931 Patients 360 http://vimeo.com/114725576 Real-Time Monitoring
  56. 56. Physician Relations Resources Referring physician experience management overview Ohio State University Medical Center Cleveland Clinic MD Anderson Texas Children’s University of Michigan Health System Experience Mapping Workshops Building Enduring Relationships with Referring Physicians Healthcare Growth Playbook Marketing in the Era of Health Reform Message Mapping – Creating a Communication Roadmap
  57. 57. Patient Experience Resources University of Michigan Health System MD Anderson Linking Marketing and Operations 2012 Benchmarking Study with Beryl, APQC Froedtert Health Emergency Department Patient Experience management overview 2012 Patient Experience with Beryl, APQC Patient Experience: The Key to Marketing Effectiveness Experience Mapping Workshops: Path to Care: Patient Experience Management ISHPMR Creating Patient Enchantment Business Case Development through Empathy – Froedtert Using Patient Stories to Create a Culture that Cares – MD Anderson VOC for Marketing Gelb-MDACC
  58. 58. Brand and Marketing Resources Healthcare Brands Marketing in the Era of Health Reform Healthcare Marketing Strategy Froedtert Health Barnes Jewish Healthcare Growth Playbook with Strategic Marketing Planning Template Message Mapping Brand Architecture MD Anderson Brand Book Social Media in Healthcare Advertising Testing Techniques Texas Children’s Segmentation and Marketing Strategy
  59. 59. Patients ReferrersInternal • Conducting weekly meetings between faculty and service staff • Enhancing the role of volunteers, including recruitment & their role in the patient experience • Offering amenities to paramedics • Sharing best practices across multiple departments • Including front-line staff in operational redesign, particularly for call center and scheduling • Implementing real-time organizational effectiveness feedback system • Developing uniform customer service standards across roles • Providing scripting for organizations, especially front line staff • Implementing weekly progress meetings • Creating non-traditional support groups • Improving waiting areas by providing laptops for checkout, pagers for patients and separate areas for adults and children • Customizing welcome packets based on geography and personal preferences • Offering patient advocates, particularly for destination and international patients • Screening interviewees to share their story for inclusion in marketing materials • Implementing real-time feedback system for patients and referring physicians • Mapping out the experience by setting expectations for every step and reiterating during steps • Including referrers on advisory boards • Sending “thank you” notes and/or calling to thank them for every referral • Adding photos and sub-specialty focus to faculty directory • Promoting availability of diagnostic center for undiagnosed patients • Revamping follow-up notes to include a concise summary upfront • Creating opportunities for on-site CME, backstage tours, and meet and greet with faculty • Courtesy calls for a personal touch and rapport with physicians Experience Management Best Practices
  60. 60. Strategic Priority Links to Clinical Excellence Competitive Advantage Source: Gelb/APQC/Beryl Institute Benchmarking Study Patient Experience Maturity
  61. 61. Source: Gelb Consulting Benchmarking survey Physician Experience Maturity
  62. 62. • Mobile appointment status updates • Suggestions for activities, restaurants ,rest areas, quiet areas. • Self Service/Real Time Scheduling • Customized communication • Intelligent queuing • Intelligent complex appointment coordination • Demonstrated concern for needs/problems • Central database to track staff availability & patient needs • Single contact resolution, real time recovery • Vehicles for feedback collection and action • Service Standards for Patient Interaction, Service Excellence • First visit greeting • Clear way-finding • Quiet spaces available • Friendly knowledgeable staff • Efficient registration • Accurate insurance verification/financial clearance • 24 hour call back standard/ tracking metrics • Abandon metrics, complaints , kudos shared with faculty and front end • Financial Counselors available for consultation • Friendly knowledgeable staff • Dedicated fast-track appointment openings • “Commit to sit” • “What do you need today?” process • Clear, accessible care plans/protocols (paper, virtual) • Sponsored support options • Dedicated single point of contact • Holistic therapy options • Journey coordinators • Contact information (phone number, email, patient portal) for continuing needs • Friendly knowledgeable staff • Personal call to referring physician to coordinate follow-up care and thank for referral • Post-visit patient contact • Patient friendly static websites • Diagnosis Based Ed Materials • Friendly knowledgeable staff • Telemedicine and Telecommunication options • Automated lab reporting • Customized communication • Patient and Family Centered Care Models • Templates for patient tracking from central data base • Seamless EHR transfer • What if personalized financial impacts • Collection of Medical Records • Staff tracking tools • Live answer to all calls (instant queue) • Single Contact Resolution/real-time recovery • Personalized on-line access to info • Retinal identification for intake to clinic • Valet voucher, assigned first visit escort • Concierge Program • Intelligent on-site queuing • Intelligent on-site complex appointment coordination • Interactive web design with chat access • Mobile friendly content • Service Standards for Patient Interaction, Service Excellence • Friendly knowledgeable staff • Community based education • Proactive outreach (patients/ physicians) Educate Evaluate Schedule Visit / Treat Follow- up EnchantEngageSatisfy Access Center Best Practices
  63. 63. Our Team Leaders John McKeever, MBA, Executive Vice President • Nationally recognized expert in healthcare strategy, particularly experience management Nicole Coy, MA, Experience Practice Lead • Has led scores of projects with our healthcare clients over the past 10 years Shannon Frazier, MBA, Digital Insights and Dashboards Practice Lead • Over 10 years of business management experience; has installed systems for over 25 healthcare clients Mike Taylor, MBA, Senor Advisor - Research • JD Power pedigree with decades of research experience Ed Tucker, MPH, FACHE, Senior Advisor – Healthcare Strategy • Over 30 years of experience in executive roles in major healthcare systems including the VA and Texas Medical Center Jill Secord, RN, MBA, Senior Advisor – Clinical Operations and Business Development • Over 38 years of experience as nurse, lean certified internal consultant and former Executive Director of Destination Programs at University of Michigan Health System Carol Packard, PhD., Senior Advisor – Organizational Development • Over 20 years experience in organizational development including system-wide Service Excellence programs
  64. 64. Endeavor Management is a management consulting firm that leads clients to achieve real value from their strategic transformational initiatives. We serve as a catalyst by providing the energy to maintain the dual perspective of running the business while changing the business through the application of key leadership principles and business strategy. In 2012, Gelb Consulting became an Endeavor Management Company. Our combined experience (Gelb founded in 1965) offers clients unique capabilities to focus their strategic initiatives with a thorough understanding of customer needs to drive marketing strategies, build trusted brands, deliver exceptional customer experiences and launch new products. Our experienced consultants and analysts use advanced marketing research techniques to identify customer needs and spot high potential market opportunities. The firm’s 40 year heritage has produced a substantial portfolio of proven methodologies, enabling Endeavor consultants to deliver top-tier transformational strategies, operational excellence, organizational change management, leadership development and decision support. Endeavor’s deep operational insight and broad industry experience enables our team to quickly understand the dynamics of client companies and markets. Endeavor strives to collaborate effectively at all levels of the client organization to deliver targeted outcomes and achieve real results. Our collaborative approach also enables clients to build capabilities within their own organizations to sustain enduring relationships. 2700 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 1400 Houston, TX 77056 +800 846-4051 info@gelbconsulting.com www.endeavormgmt.com/healthcare

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