Beyond whitepaper-US

Beyond
Beyond Beyond
$
Taking friction
out of banking
How can banks improve the digital experience
to retain customers in a competitive market?
December 2015
2
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Retail banks are set for a period of intense competition as new players
move in on their customers1
. While established technology companies
like Apple venture into payments, FinTech startups like Transferwise and
Lending Club are ready to pick off the banks’ individual services – and
with them, their customers – as the threat of unbundling increases2
.
At the same time, banks are struggling to keep up with customer
expectations fostered in a post-mobile world of immediate connectivity
and instant gratification. As customers get used to intuitive, seamless
and secure experiences from the likes of Google or Apple, the race is
on for banks to beat the digital challengers at their own game, delivering
compelling customer experiences that meet increasingly sophisticated
expectations.
For one of the most highly regulated industries in the world, this is no mean
feat, particularly given the speed at which the goalposts are moving. To
understand the scale of the threat to banks, we tested the readiness of
US consumers to switch to non-bank, online-only challengers. We also
asked what consumers expect from the digital banking experience, to
understand how banks can better meet their needs and avoid losing them
to competitors.
The pressure is on to design an improved customer experience, or lose
out to rivals that can match growing expectations. Banks aren’t evolving
quickly enough, which is putting their branches - and their historic position
in society - under threat. So, what do customers want from digital banking,
and how can banks best organize themselves to meet their constantly
evolving expectations?
Nick Rappolt, CEO, Beyond
1. McKinsey, The Fight for the Customer: McKinsey Global Banking Annual Review 2015, 2015
2. CB Insights, Disrupting Banking: The FinTech Startups That Are Unbundling Wells Fargo, Citi and Bank of America, 2015
Foreword
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3
The research
Customer experience is now a key battleground in
the fight for banking customers3.
Banks face a growing challenge from established
technology companies and FinTech startups, both
fighting to skim the profitable ‘cream’ from the banking
customer relationship.
In fall 2015, Beyond surveyed 1,011 US consumers to
explore the scale of the threat to banks, and understand
how they can better respond to customer expectations
from the digital banking experience.
The results revealed that banks are under severe
pressure to fight off digital challengers, and still have
work to do to meet customers’ basic expectations.
3. McKinsey 2015
4
The current
customer experience
Technology has fundamentally changed the way customers interact
with brands.
Round-the-clock connectivity via mobile has made instant gratification the
norm, and has fueled the expectation that any brand’s service should be
immediately available, whenever it is needed4
.
At the same time, expectations from digital brand interactions have become
increasingly sophisticated. Exposure to products from the likes of Google
and Apple has led customers to expect simple, fast and consistent digital
experiences that are, in a word, seamless.
As interactions move online and expectations grow more sophisticated,
brands are being defined by the quality of the digital customer
experience they deliver. Today, a good experience is one that delivers the
following fundamental elements: ease, speed, security, consistency and
personalization.
For banks, regulatory restrictions can make digital innovation a minefield.
Nevertheless, too many banks still think of the digital customer experience
as a technology challenge, when they should be thinking about it as a
human interaction problem.
To make meaningful improvements to the digital customer experience,
they must put themselves in their customers’ shoes.
4. Forrester, Moments That Matter: Intent-Rich Moments Are Critical To Winning Today’s
Consumer Journey, 2015
24
5
Mapping the digital threat
6
Customers are as
interested in financial
offerings from tech
brands as they are
from banks
To uncover the scale of the
threat banks face, the survey tested
consumer interest in banking services
from FinTech startups and established
technology companies.
Customers are interested in new
financial offerings from tech brands.
of respondents are
interested in financial
offerings from PayPal –
the most popular digital-
only choice.
The threat from digital challengers is real, and it is substantial.
This is troubling news for banks. In the competition for customer
relationships, it pits them directly against companies with a clear advantage:
the ability to deliver intuitive, compelling experiences across platforms.
If banks cannot deliver the same thing, they will not be able to meet
expectations and sustain customer relationships. Companies that offer
a better experience may simply step in to fill the gap.
57%
If you were in the market for a new financial product, such as a savings product, loan or payment product, how
interested would you be in an offer from the following brands - assuming they offered such services?
28%
33%
34%
55%
23%
24% 24% 22% 11% 19%
21% 26% 26% 9% 18%
22%
16%
22%
16%
19% 21% 20% 12% 28%
24% 27% 14% 19%
20% 20% 14% 25%
27% 27% 12% 18%
22% 23% 9% 25%
25% 24% 10% 18%
28%
24%
23%
22%
22%
20%
20%
13%
8%
9%
7%
4%
14%
15%
16%
6%
Very interesting (9-10) Not very interesting (3-4) Not at all of interest (1-2)Neutral (5-6)Interesting (7-8)
% of respondents
Chase
Google
Wells Fargo
Capital One
Bank of America
Citibank
Walmart
Ally
Apple
0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100%
My local bank
or credit union
Paypal
Amazon
7
Online-only financial interest
	
To what extent would you consider using new online-only banking services for the following
services/products?
45%
45% 34% 13% 8%
6%43% 34% 18%
30% 27% 27% 16%
18%24%37%
32% 28% 20%
22%
21%
19% 35% 31% 15%
32% 18% 5%
Online-only banking
services are widely
accepted by US consumers
To further assess the threat from digital
competitors, the research tested consumer
readiness for online-only banking.
The results revealed that a majority of customers
are open to online-only offerings, compounding
the challenge for banks:
of respondents would consider
an online-only service for all their
banking needs.
This rose to 79% for payments and money transfer,
and 77% for checking accounts.
Those with more complex financial products – often
the banks’ most profitable customers — were even
more receptive to online-only offerings
(65% vs. 57%).
57%
I would DEFINITELY consider
online-only banking
I would NOT consider
online-only banking
Not sure yetI MIGHT consider
online-only banking
% of respondents
0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100%
Checking
Account
Payments or
money transfer
Savings
Account
All my
bank needs
Insurance
Investing
Loans
As long as new challengers can deliver superior banking
experiences, customers open to online offerings are ripe for the
picking. The race is on for banks to catch up and improve digital
experiences, before rivals tempt their customers away.
8
Changing expectations:
The digital experience pyramid
9
The sophistication of a company’s
digital customer experience can
be assessed against this pyramid.
Hygiene
Factors
Think for me -
suggest based on
knowing me and be
my agent
Do it for me -
anticipate my needs
Make it faster than
other ways of doing it
Make it easy
to do
Make it safe
and secure
Market
Leadership/
Trail Blazers
As major technology companies deliver increasingly intelligent,
personalized digital experiences, customer expectations are rapidly
becoming more sophisticated.
As expectations move up the pyramid, factors that were once impressive
are now perceived as basic, entry-level requirements for a good
customer experience.
The gap is widening between market-leaders and their competitors, with
banks finding themselves stuck at the bottom of the pyramid, struggling
to fulfil their customers’ most basic expectations from the digital
banking experience.
Banks cannot move up the pyramid until they deliver against these
fundamentals – and until they do, the difference between their customer
experience and that of their rivals will only become starker.
Moving up the digital customer experience pyramid —
from hygiene basics to becoming indispensable
BASELINE FOR CUSTOMER EXPECTATIONS
10
Meeting customer expectations
11
As we have seen, customer experience is a
key battleground for banks looking to fend
off the threat of customer attrition. So how
do banks’ current digital products stand
up to scrutiny?
The survey asked customers to rate their
current banking experience, drawing
attention to key areas for improvement.
From the data, it was clear that customers
want improvement from even the
most basic areas of the digital banking
experience:
Security: 71%
wanted additional levels of security
Speed: 53%
wanted faster ways to transact online
Ease: 50%
wanted easier ways to log into
their account
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Digital experience improvement interest
Which areas of the current online/digital experience would you like to see your bank/financial institutions improve?
Customers want
improvements to the most
basic areas of the digital
banking experience
Notably, these three concerns map onto the bottom
of the customer experience pyramid in terms of
sophistication.
48%
26%
26% 24% 23% 18%
25% 28% 23%
23%
22%
22%
20%
18% 26% 25% 14% 18%
23% 20% 12% 25%
23% 25% 13% 17%
21% 23% 11% 25%
26% 25% 10%
10%
15%
15%
27% 21% 9%
9%
18%
23% 14% 6% 9%
Significant improvement needed (9-10) Little improvement (3-4) No improvement needed (1-2)Neutral (5-6)Some improvement needed (7-8)
% of respondents
Additional levels of security
Quicker ways to do transactions online
Easier ways to sign in to view your account details
Better online tools to help you find ways to save
money, using your data
Better online tools to help you make better financial
decisions, using your data
Improved mobile app
Better budgeting and goal-setting tools,
using your data
Quicker ways to do transactions on a mobile
Online advice personalized to you,
utilising your own data
0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100%
Tech competitors already sit at the top of the chain,
delivering intuitive experiences that anticipate their
customers’ needs.
These concerns also pose a particular design challenge,
as demands for security can often conflict with those for
speed and ease.
To offer a greater sense of security,
banks often build in multiple
authentication steps – slowing down
the banking experience and adding
friction to the log-in process.
13
Fingerprint technology is an example of the thorny
design challenges banks face when improving their
digital offerings.
Though it is an obvious and powerful response to
customer demand for improved security, difficulties emerge
when trying to present fingerprint authentication to new
customers.
When asked for their preferred log-in method, only 24% of
US customers chose fingerprint technology. This rose to
48% amongst those that had already used it – a dramatic
gap in perception that suggests customers mistrust the
technology before actually testing it for themselves.
The challenge for banks is to overcome this education gap
as part of the design solution, demonstrating the palpable
benefits to consumers while explaining how safe these
technologies are.
Design
challenge:
security
14
Though the removal of friction is a core
principle of experience design, in this case,
banks must be careful about how much they
strip away from the banking experience.
With data breaches dominating the news in
both technology and finance, deep-held
anxieties around security are unlikely to go away
anytime soon. This must be remembered when
designing for speed and ease, as a banking
process that seems too fast and too easy can
make customers feel security is not being
taken seriously.
In many cases, software already exists to
improve the banking experience but has been
held back due to customer anxieties over its
delivery. A former head of security at a large
bank illustrated this by relating to us the results
the bank had in testing voice authentication to
simplify the call centre experience. It received
a poor response from customers making calls
to the bank when conducted without audible
prompts or feedback. Without the familiar ritual
of security questions, customers did not feel they
were being properly identified and believed the
method to be unsafe.
Clearly, there remains a need for theatre in the
banking experience. The performance of the
security process is crucial for demonstrating a
bank’s respect for its customers’ security –
even when it is not technologically necessary.
Design challenge:
speed and ease
15
Customers want
personalized online tools
In addition to the basics of security, speed
and ease, many customers also want the
banking experience to respond to their
needs with sophisticated online tools.
In particular, they want:
Most important priorities
Thinking about your daily use of your bank’s services, please rank the following in order of
importance in terms of what matters most to you:
Most important Third Fourth Least importantSecond
48%
34% 27% 25% 9% 5%
8%
6%
5% 11% 16% 41% 26%
29% 32% 14% 19%
9% 15% 26% 42%
24% 11% 9% 8% The quality of the
experience in the branch
The quality of the
experience on a
desktop/laptop computer
The quality of the experience
on a smartphone/tablet app
The quality of the experience
over the phone
The quality of the
experience on a
smartphone/tablet web
browser
% of respondents
0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100%
Money-saving tools:
Guidance on financial
decisions:
53% want better online tools to help them
save money, based on their data
49% want better online tools to help them
make financial decisions, based on their data
Evidently, the ideal digital banking experience is not a
‘one-size-fits-all’ solution, as there is customer demand
for digital products that respond to them as individuals,
delivering a personalized service based on their data.
16
Though more than half of customers clearly
want banks to do more with their data, the road
to personalized online tools is fraught with
potential dangers.
For an example of what not to do, banks should
look to ad-retargeting, which makes consumers
uncomfortable and angry with the repeat
intrusion into their digital lives. Recent research
has shown that 55% of consumers are put off
buying an item when retargeted with multiple
adverts after their initial research5
.
5. InSkin Media, RESEARCH – Consumers 37% more likely to click on an ad on a site they
trust, October 2014
If a bank does not clearly state that it is using
personal data, or explain the benefit this gives to
the customer, it risks creating a perceived breach
of trust.
As a result, clear storytelling and nuanced
interaction design are key tools in presenting
customers with personalized solutions that gain
their approval – from budget-setters to
retirement-planning tools.
Design challenge:
personal data
17
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Designing for need
18
In assessing the data, it is important
to recognize that the design solution
cannot simply be imposed on customers,
but must instead respond to their needs
in a tailored and intelligent manner.
More than 5 financial products owned/used3-5 products owned/used2 or fewer products owned/used
76%
72%
63%
50%
52%
56%
50%
50%
49%
54%
56%
45%
45%
43% 42%
56%
48%
42% 42%
44%
49% 47%
41%
40%
46%
42%
41%
Interest in improvement to the digital experience – by number of FS products 	
		
Which areas of the current online/digital experience would you like to see your bank/financial
institutions improve?	
0%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
70%
60%
80%
Additional
levels of
security
Better online
tools to help you
find ways to save
money, using
your data
Easier ways
to sign in to
view your
account details
Quicker
ways to do
transactions
online
Online advice
personalized
to you, utilising
your own data
Better online
tools to help
you make
better financial
decisions, using
your data
Better
budgeting and
goal-setting
tools, using
your data
Improved
mobile app
Quicker ways to
do transactions
on a mobile
%ofrespondentsstatingimrprovementsrequired
% of respondents
In the survey, expectations from the digital banking
experience differed greatly between customers with
simple financial needs (2 financial products or fewer)
and those with complex requirements from their banks
(5 financial products or more).
19
High-value customers
want more from all touch
-points of the digital
banking experience
Interestingly, the research found that those
with the most complex financial needs – often
the banks’ most profitable customers – had the
highest expectations from the digital banking
experience.
Those with complex financial needs demanded
more from almost all touch-points of the banking
experience:
Security: 76%
Speed: 56%
Ease: 50%
wanted additional levels of security
(vs. 71% average)
wanted faster ways to transact online
(vs. 53% average)
wanted easier ways to log into their
account (vs. 50% average)
56% wanted better online tools to help
them save money, based on their data
(vs. 53% average)
56% want better online tools to help them make
financial decisions, based on their data (vs. 49%
average)
Money-saving tools:
Guidance on financial
decisions:
This is a threat, as these demanding
customers are the most likely to become
frustrated with their current banking
experience, leaving them wide open to offers
from online-only competitors. In redesigning
the digital customer experience, banks must
take customer expectations and interests
seriously, and tailor products to their needs.
20
Customers still value the
branch experience
Finally, the research showed that branches are
still important to customers, but decreasing in
significance as digital channels grow.
When asked what mattered most to them when
dealing with their bank, customers ranked the
quality of the branch experience very highly:
Though the battle for customers will be increasingly
fought online, the branch remains significant – at
least for now.
As a result, improvements to the digital banking
experience should include the branch, to provide
seamless, platform-agnostic experiences that
recognize the role the physical bank still plays in
customers’ lives.
Branch:
Desktop/laptop:
For 34%, the quality of the desktop/laptop
experience mattered most
Apps:
8% prioritized the quality of the
smartphone/tablet app experience
Telephone:
For 6%, the quality of the telephone
experience mattered most
Mobile browsing:
5% prioritized the experience on
a smartphone/tablet browser
48% put most importance on the quality
of the branch experience
21
Conclusions and recommendations
22
Banks face a major challenge
when looking to redesign
their digital offerings. The
speed at which customer
expectations are changing is
faster than ever.
As established technology companies deliver
increasingly sophisticated experiences, customers
are asking ever more from other digital experiences.
While security, speed and ease remain central
customer concerns, expectations from the digital
banking experience are evolving so rapidly that
banks are struggling to keep up.
There is no silver bullet solution for banks, but one
thing is clear – to fend off the threat from digital
competitors, they must be able to respond more
quickly to changing customer needs.
23
It is important to understand our research as a
snapshot in time. In the UK, time spent with digital
media eclipsed TV in 2013, and time spent on
mobiles overtook desktop and laptop use in 20156
.
Smartphone penetration in the UK went from 20%
in 2010 to 72% in 20157
. In 2014 the British Banking
Association said online banking apps were
downloaded at a rate of 15,000 per day. In other
words, it’s an understatement to say that the speed
with which customer behaviors are changing is rapid.
Our research shows that already, 7.5% of consumers
think the app experience is the most important
touchpoint in banking, while 5% think this of the
mobile browsing experience. That might still seem
like small numbers, but consider the following factors
that suggest we are nearing an inflection point:
•	 Many banks and online financial services
companies we have spoken to now have more
mobile traffic than desktop traffic. When you
extrapolate those traffic trends, mobile will
become the dominant bank touchpoint for
customers in the next 3-5 years.
•	 Mobile conversions and transaction sizes
have historically underperformed against PC
conversions8, due to customers being deterred
by small screen sizes, awkward data entry and
security concerns. This is all changing, especially
for companies that exploit the speed and ease
of apps9, as well as the advantages mobiles
have in terms of authentication and data input
options compared to the very limited PC.
•	 The pace of innovation in mobile is starting
to accelerate. Mobiles have gone from being
limited PCs to something far more powerful.
They bring many more interaction possibilities,
such as beacons, notifications, deep-links,
touch payments, and easier capture of personal
data, including sensors, APIs and data
availability. Over time, the smartphone will be
far more than a simple tool for banking
transactions – it will know you far better than
any computer ever has, opening completely
new possibilities for how we manage our money.
Where are
we headed?
6. eMarketer, UK adults spend more time on mobile devices than on PCs, April 2015
7. Statistica, Smartphone user penetration in the UK, 2015
24
Ultimately, what this means is
that banks have to balance two
different priorities
On the one hand, banks need to better cater to digital natives
who expect the whole journey to happen on their phone.
This will also enable banks to experiment with what purely digital
banking can become – and what the mass market will eventually
want. Digital banking experiences today too often mimic the
paper forms and processes of an analogue age, but there is
no reason why this should continue to be the dominant design
paradigm. Some banks are already working on rethinking parts
of banking from the ground up, and finding ways to appeal to
early adopters – for example, Barclays’ Pingit. However, they
need to accelerate the speed at which they get these ideas to
market in order to fend off the threat from digital competitors.
On the other hand banks need to ensure everyone else also
has an optimal experience, regardless of the channel through
which they choose to engage. This introduces an awful lot of
complexity, as there are now so many different ways to engage:
different screen types, user journeys and need states.
25
Banks are now in a race to handle these dual
prerogatives: finding ways to innovate while also
building consistent omni-channel experiences.
Both objectives face major obstacles.
The digital insight gap
Banks possess a wealth of traditional insight about
their customers, but much of the data gathering
banks do today was designed around a specific
product or channel. Today’s customers rarely
follow a linear journey – they jump between
channels. Therefore, banks lack insight into the
cross-channel decision journey – making it difficult
to design experiences that respond to customer
needs.
As one bank told us, they understand what
happens in the channel, not outside of it – they
are not connecting data points across channels
and therefore do not see the complete customer
experience picture. Further, there is often a
tendency to default to channels where there
are established processes in place to handle
customers, rather than the channels the customer
wants to use. This causes a disconnect in how
banks use channels when they communicate with
customers, and how they track interactions – for
instance, mailing a letter in response to an online
interaction.
Traditional customer metrics, such as satisfaction,
loyalty and net promoter score, allow for simple
performance tracking over time but have
limited capacity for shedding light on changing
customer expectations. Banks need new ways of
understanding customer needs and differentiating
between the various emotional need states that
trigger the need for financial products.
Unstructured data is becoming an increasingly
important part of the puzzle and banks often
lack the tools to process it.
Obstacles to overcome
26
Banks have added on channels to engage with
customers as they have appeared, but often as
bolt-ons rather than integrating with existing
operations.
The consequence is that banks are poorly
equipped to serve the same experience to
customers who engage with them in more
than one channel and who own more than one
product.
One company we have spoken to has six different
CRM databases that don’t talk to each other.
Add to that technology stacks that are 20 or
more years old, built long before apps had been
conceived, and you can see that the share of
the banks’ digital budgets spent on design and
innovation becomes a tiny percentage of the
overall technology budget.
This taxes banks when compared to start-ups that
are operating with single-channel, single-product
offerings and using technology stacks that are
only a couple of years old which can be switched
out as they scale.
But IT isn’t the only piece of legacy that banks
need to contend with. As one bank put it: “cultural
change is half the battle in improving customer
experience in a digital age - how do you get staff
onboard?”
As part of this, many banks are looking to create
‘lighthouse projects’ — innovative, high-visibility
projects that show what’s possible, to make other
staff say, “I want that”, and galvanize the desire for
change.
Risk mitigation
Banks have traditionally used long design and
development cycles to mitigate risk and deal with
complexity, but these do not account for rapid
changes in consumer behaviour and expectations
– the challenge is that solutions are already
outdated by the time they launch.
Design and development cycles are measured in
years compared to the months, or even weeks,
that is the norm for start-ups.
As one banker put it – “it is the challenge of
turning around a supertanker – but we will have
to adapt.”
Legacy systems
27
Recommendations
Beyond recommends five key ways for banks to meet the
speed of change:
5
the harder it is to convert customers
through a purely digital channel. While
countless start-ups are trying to find the
formula to automate this, humans are still
needed. Banks could retool how branches
deliver advice by arming their colleagues
with the technology they need in-branch
to give the customers the best of
both worlds.
Blend the physical and
the digital
Despite the growing significance of digital
channels, branches are still important to
customers. As a result, banks have an
advantage if they can create seamless
online and offline experiences that
enhance the overall value they bring.
Customers are growing ever more open
to new providers and online-only offerings.
Though this is a threat to banks, it’s also
an opportunity for them to use their
advantage – the physical branch – to
retain customers.
Consumers show a clear appetite for
self-service, from using ATMs to making
payments online, rather than having to
use a human intermediary. As a result,
branch visits have dropped 90% since
199510. However, when it comes to making
financial decisions – especially when they
have large potential consequences – we
see consumers need assurance that they
are making the right decisions.
10. Brett King, Bank 3.0, 2013
28
Use new data sources
to map experiences and
uncover points of friction
Established technology companies like
Amazon and Google benefit from massive
amounts of behavioral data, which provides
them with a deep understanding of their
customers’ typical online activity. This allows
them to create sophisticated digital experiences
that anticipate decisions based on past actions.
Google’s autocomplete function, which predicts
what you are likely to be searching for, and
suggests sentences to complete the search you
started, is an example. They also extensively use
fast and iterative user research to get continuous
insight into the “why” behind what people do.
To uncover points of friction and understand
what needs to be improved, banks need to break
down the customer journey using key insights
built on behavioural data. Only by mapping out
the end-to-end customer journey for all their
customer types can a bank truly improve and
personalize the experience.
Partner for big ideas
One way to get ahead of the game is through
extensive ideation, utilizing partners in a different
way to the traditional client-agency relationship.
Bringing external partners in to collaborate on
specific projects can get great results, especially
if both teams are co-located. This tactic works
best when separate product teams are given
the freedom to operate independently from
the core product design team to develop a
transformational product set that can be brought
to market quickly, then tested and rolled out.
Customers want fast, easy and secure access to
banking products that respond to their needs,
and to provide this, banks need a wide funnel
of ideas to pick from, and the freedom to think
about what is possible.
To keep up with the pace of change, banks must
place strategic bets on innovative new business
models and experiences – just as the disruptors
do. Several global banking firms have already
started doing this, with one third of fintech deals
since 2009 having happened in 201511.
11. CB Insights, https://www.cbinsights.com/blog/banks-record-fin-tech-investment/, 2015
29
MVP
Innovate incrementally
through repatriation
Incremental change is better than no change
at all, particularly as customer expectations are
evolving so rapidly. Instead of waiting for a major
overhaul, it can be better to improve digital
offerings more gradually.
Once transformational adjacent products
have been trialled successfully, banks can
then repatriate the innovation into existing
core products.
This could be by segmenting the audience
down further, providing new services for younger
audiences that best fit their needs, moving the
brand forward for future generations.
Launch quickly and test
A test-and-learn approach might be the antithesis
of the way large banks work, seemingly at odds
with habits of limiting risk. But, it is actually a
better way of mitigating risks and ensuring
better outcomes, as it enables the organization
to optimize and learn faster, which can mean
avoiding costly mistakes down the road.
Product development approaches like the
minimum viable product (MVP) present
opportunities to change entrenched behaviors.
MVPs are the most basic products that can go to
market and have the highest return on investment
relative to risk. They enable organizations to get
rapid feedback on new offerings, which they can
then iterate, and help avoid the development
of products and features that do not meet
customers’ needs.
If banks can act on these principles, they
will become truly indispensable to their
If banks can act on these principles, they will
become truly indispensable to their customers.
If they cannot, they will struggle to survive in
an increasingly competitive market.
30
Summary of data
31
Customers are as interested in financial offerings
from tech brands as they are from banks
•	 57% of respondents are interested in financial offerings from PayPal –the
most popular digital-only choice.
Online-only banking services are widely accepted
by US consumers
•	 57% of respondents would consider an online - only service for all their
banking needs
•	 This rose to 79% for payments and money transfer and 77% for current
accounts
•	 Those with complex financial needs (5 financial products or more) –
often the banks’ most profitable customers – were even more receptive
to online-only offerings (65% vs. 57%)
Customers want improvements to the most basic
areas of the digital banking experience
•	 Security: 71% wanted additional levels of security
•	 Speed: 53% wanted faster ways to transact online
•	 Ease: 50% wanted easier ways to log into their account
Beyond surveyed 1,011 US respondents, to
assess consumer readiness for online-only
banking and to discover what consumers
want from the digital banking experience.
The results were as follows:
32
Customers want personalized online tools
•	 Money Saving Tools: 53% wanted better online tools to help them save
money, based on their data
•	 Guidance on Financial Descisions: 49% wanted better online tools to
High-value customers want more from all touch-points of
the digital banking experience
•	 Security: 76% wanted additional levels of security (vs. 71% average)
•	 Speed: 65% wanted faster ways to transact online (vs. 53% average)
•	 Ease: 50% wanted easier ways to log into their account (vs. 50% average)
•	 Money Saving Tools: 56% wanted better online tools to help them save
money, based on their data (vs. 53% average)
•	 Guidance on Financial Descisions: 56% wanted better online tools to help
them make financial decisions, based on their data (vs. 49% average)
Customers still value the branch experience
•	 Branch: 48% put most importance on the quality of the branch experience
•	 Desktop/laptop: For 34%, the quality of the desktop/laptop experience
mattered most
•	 Apps: 8% prioritised the quality of the smartphone/tablet app experience
•	 Telephone: For 6%, the quality of the telephone experience mattered most
•	 Mobile Browsing: 5% prioritized the experience on a smartphone/tablet
browser
33
Beyond works with companies to create amazing
connected experiences by making products more
enjoyable, simpler and easy to use.
Our mission is to remove friction from the customer
journey and digitally design the experiences that
define your brand. We are an experience design
agency with studios in San Francisco, New York,
London and Mountain View.
About us
Studios
1 sur 33

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Beyond whitepaper-US

  • 1. $ Taking friction out of banking How can banks improve the digital experience to retain customers in a competitive market? December 2015
  • 2. 2 $ Retail banks are set for a period of intense competition as new players move in on their customers1 . While established technology companies like Apple venture into payments, FinTech startups like Transferwise and Lending Club are ready to pick off the banks’ individual services – and with them, their customers – as the threat of unbundling increases2 . At the same time, banks are struggling to keep up with customer expectations fostered in a post-mobile world of immediate connectivity and instant gratification. As customers get used to intuitive, seamless and secure experiences from the likes of Google or Apple, the race is on for banks to beat the digital challengers at their own game, delivering compelling customer experiences that meet increasingly sophisticated expectations. For one of the most highly regulated industries in the world, this is no mean feat, particularly given the speed at which the goalposts are moving. To understand the scale of the threat to banks, we tested the readiness of US consumers to switch to non-bank, online-only challengers. We also asked what consumers expect from the digital banking experience, to understand how banks can better meet their needs and avoid losing them to competitors. The pressure is on to design an improved customer experience, or lose out to rivals that can match growing expectations. Banks aren’t evolving quickly enough, which is putting their branches - and their historic position in society - under threat. So, what do customers want from digital banking, and how can banks best organize themselves to meet their constantly evolving expectations? Nick Rappolt, CEO, Beyond 1. McKinsey, The Fight for the Customer: McKinsey Global Banking Annual Review 2015, 2015 2. CB Insights, Disrupting Banking: The FinTech Startups That Are Unbundling Wells Fargo, Citi and Bank of America, 2015 Foreword $ $ $ $
  • 3. 3 The research Customer experience is now a key battleground in the fight for banking customers3. Banks face a growing challenge from established technology companies and FinTech startups, both fighting to skim the profitable ‘cream’ from the banking customer relationship. In fall 2015, Beyond surveyed 1,011 US consumers to explore the scale of the threat to banks, and understand how they can better respond to customer expectations from the digital banking experience. The results revealed that banks are under severe pressure to fight off digital challengers, and still have work to do to meet customers’ basic expectations. 3. McKinsey 2015
  • 4. 4 The current customer experience Technology has fundamentally changed the way customers interact with brands. Round-the-clock connectivity via mobile has made instant gratification the norm, and has fueled the expectation that any brand’s service should be immediately available, whenever it is needed4 . At the same time, expectations from digital brand interactions have become increasingly sophisticated. Exposure to products from the likes of Google and Apple has led customers to expect simple, fast and consistent digital experiences that are, in a word, seamless. As interactions move online and expectations grow more sophisticated, brands are being defined by the quality of the digital customer experience they deliver. Today, a good experience is one that delivers the following fundamental elements: ease, speed, security, consistency and personalization. For banks, regulatory restrictions can make digital innovation a minefield. Nevertheless, too many banks still think of the digital customer experience as a technology challenge, when they should be thinking about it as a human interaction problem. To make meaningful improvements to the digital customer experience, they must put themselves in their customers’ shoes. 4. Forrester, Moments That Matter: Intent-Rich Moments Are Critical To Winning Today’s Consumer Journey, 2015 24
  • 6. 6 Customers are as interested in financial offerings from tech brands as they are from banks To uncover the scale of the threat banks face, the survey tested consumer interest in banking services from FinTech startups and established technology companies. Customers are interested in new financial offerings from tech brands. of respondents are interested in financial offerings from PayPal – the most popular digital- only choice. The threat from digital challengers is real, and it is substantial. This is troubling news for banks. In the competition for customer relationships, it pits them directly against companies with a clear advantage: the ability to deliver intuitive, compelling experiences across platforms. If banks cannot deliver the same thing, they will not be able to meet expectations and sustain customer relationships. Companies that offer a better experience may simply step in to fill the gap. 57% If you were in the market for a new financial product, such as a savings product, loan or payment product, how interested would you be in an offer from the following brands - assuming they offered such services? 28% 33% 34% 55% 23% 24% 24% 22% 11% 19% 21% 26% 26% 9% 18% 22% 16% 22% 16% 19% 21% 20% 12% 28% 24% 27% 14% 19% 20% 20% 14% 25% 27% 27% 12% 18% 22% 23% 9% 25% 25% 24% 10% 18% 28% 24% 23% 22% 22% 20% 20% 13% 8% 9% 7% 4% 14% 15% 16% 6% Very interesting (9-10) Not very interesting (3-4) Not at all of interest (1-2)Neutral (5-6)Interesting (7-8) % of respondents Chase Google Wells Fargo Capital One Bank of America Citibank Walmart Ally Apple 0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100% My local bank or credit union Paypal Amazon
  • 7. 7 Online-only financial interest To what extent would you consider using new online-only banking services for the following services/products? 45% 45% 34% 13% 8% 6%43% 34% 18% 30% 27% 27% 16% 18%24%37% 32% 28% 20% 22% 21% 19% 35% 31% 15% 32% 18% 5% Online-only banking services are widely accepted by US consumers To further assess the threat from digital competitors, the research tested consumer readiness for online-only banking. The results revealed that a majority of customers are open to online-only offerings, compounding the challenge for banks: of respondents would consider an online-only service for all their banking needs. This rose to 79% for payments and money transfer, and 77% for checking accounts. Those with more complex financial products – often the banks’ most profitable customers — were even more receptive to online-only offerings (65% vs. 57%). 57% I would DEFINITELY consider online-only banking I would NOT consider online-only banking Not sure yetI MIGHT consider online-only banking % of respondents 0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100% Checking Account Payments or money transfer Savings Account All my bank needs Insurance Investing Loans As long as new challengers can deliver superior banking experiences, customers open to online offerings are ripe for the picking. The race is on for banks to catch up and improve digital experiences, before rivals tempt their customers away.
  • 9. 9 The sophistication of a company’s digital customer experience can be assessed against this pyramid. Hygiene Factors Think for me - suggest based on knowing me and be my agent Do it for me - anticipate my needs Make it faster than other ways of doing it Make it easy to do Make it safe and secure Market Leadership/ Trail Blazers As major technology companies deliver increasingly intelligent, personalized digital experiences, customer expectations are rapidly becoming more sophisticated. As expectations move up the pyramid, factors that were once impressive are now perceived as basic, entry-level requirements for a good customer experience. The gap is widening between market-leaders and their competitors, with banks finding themselves stuck at the bottom of the pyramid, struggling to fulfil their customers’ most basic expectations from the digital banking experience. Banks cannot move up the pyramid until they deliver against these fundamentals – and until they do, the difference between their customer experience and that of their rivals will only become starker. Moving up the digital customer experience pyramid — from hygiene basics to becoming indispensable BASELINE FOR CUSTOMER EXPECTATIONS
  • 11. 11 As we have seen, customer experience is a key battleground for banks looking to fend off the threat of customer attrition. So how do banks’ current digital products stand up to scrutiny? The survey asked customers to rate their current banking experience, drawing attention to key areas for improvement. From the data, it was clear that customers want improvement from even the most basic areas of the digital banking experience: Security: 71% wanted additional levels of security Speed: 53% wanted faster ways to transact online Ease: 50% wanted easier ways to log into their account
  • 12. 12 Digital experience improvement interest Which areas of the current online/digital experience would you like to see your bank/financial institutions improve? Customers want improvements to the most basic areas of the digital banking experience Notably, these three concerns map onto the bottom of the customer experience pyramid in terms of sophistication. 48% 26% 26% 24% 23% 18% 25% 28% 23% 23% 22% 22% 20% 18% 26% 25% 14% 18% 23% 20% 12% 25% 23% 25% 13% 17% 21% 23% 11% 25% 26% 25% 10% 10% 15% 15% 27% 21% 9% 9% 18% 23% 14% 6% 9% Significant improvement needed (9-10) Little improvement (3-4) No improvement needed (1-2)Neutral (5-6)Some improvement needed (7-8) % of respondents Additional levels of security Quicker ways to do transactions online Easier ways to sign in to view your account details Better online tools to help you find ways to save money, using your data Better online tools to help you make better financial decisions, using your data Improved mobile app Better budgeting and goal-setting tools, using your data Quicker ways to do transactions on a mobile Online advice personalized to you, utilising your own data 0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100% Tech competitors already sit at the top of the chain, delivering intuitive experiences that anticipate their customers’ needs. These concerns also pose a particular design challenge, as demands for security can often conflict with those for speed and ease. To offer a greater sense of security, banks often build in multiple authentication steps – slowing down the banking experience and adding friction to the log-in process.
  • 13. 13 Fingerprint technology is an example of the thorny design challenges banks face when improving their digital offerings. Though it is an obvious and powerful response to customer demand for improved security, difficulties emerge when trying to present fingerprint authentication to new customers. When asked for their preferred log-in method, only 24% of US customers chose fingerprint technology. This rose to 48% amongst those that had already used it – a dramatic gap in perception that suggests customers mistrust the technology before actually testing it for themselves. The challenge for banks is to overcome this education gap as part of the design solution, demonstrating the palpable benefits to consumers while explaining how safe these technologies are. Design challenge: security
  • 14. 14 Though the removal of friction is a core principle of experience design, in this case, banks must be careful about how much they strip away from the banking experience. With data breaches dominating the news in both technology and finance, deep-held anxieties around security are unlikely to go away anytime soon. This must be remembered when designing for speed and ease, as a banking process that seems too fast and too easy can make customers feel security is not being taken seriously. In many cases, software already exists to improve the banking experience but has been held back due to customer anxieties over its delivery. A former head of security at a large bank illustrated this by relating to us the results the bank had in testing voice authentication to simplify the call centre experience. It received a poor response from customers making calls to the bank when conducted without audible prompts or feedback. Without the familiar ritual of security questions, customers did not feel they were being properly identified and believed the method to be unsafe. Clearly, there remains a need for theatre in the banking experience. The performance of the security process is crucial for demonstrating a bank’s respect for its customers’ security – even when it is not technologically necessary. Design challenge: speed and ease
  • 15. 15 Customers want personalized online tools In addition to the basics of security, speed and ease, many customers also want the banking experience to respond to their needs with sophisticated online tools. In particular, they want: Most important priorities Thinking about your daily use of your bank’s services, please rank the following in order of importance in terms of what matters most to you: Most important Third Fourth Least importantSecond 48% 34% 27% 25% 9% 5% 8% 6% 5% 11% 16% 41% 26% 29% 32% 14% 19% 9% 15% 26% 42% 24% 11% 9% 8% The quality of the experience in the branch The quality of the experience on a desktop/laptop computer The quality of the experience on a smartphone/tablet app The quality of the experience over the phone The quality of the experience on a smartphone/tablet web browser % of respondents 0% 40%20% 60% 80% 100% Money-saving tools: Guidance on financial decisions: 53% want better online tools to help them save money, based on their data 49% want better online tools to help them make financial decisions, based on their data Evidently, the ideal digital banking experience is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution, as there is customer demand for digital products that respond to them as individuals, delivering a personalized service based on their data.
  • 16. 16 Though more than half of customers clearly want banks to do more with their data, the road to personalized online tools is fraught with potential dangers. For an example of what not to do, banks should look to ad-retargeting, which makes consumers uncomfortable and angry with the repeat intrusion into their digital lives. Recent research has shown that 55% of consumers are put off buying an item when retargeted with multiple adverts after their initial research5 . 5. InSkin Media, RESEARCH – Consumers 37% more likely to click on an ad on a site they trust, October 2014 If a bank does not clearly state that it is using personal data, or explain the benefit this gives to the customer, it risks creating a perceived breach of trust. As a result, clear storytelling and nuanced interaction design are key tools in presenting customers with personalized solutions that gain their approval – from budget-setters to retirement-planning tools. Design challenge: personal data
  • 18. 18 In assessing the data, it is important to recognize that the design solution cannot simply be imposed on customers, but must instead respond to their needs in a tailored and intelligent manner. More than 5 financial products owned/used3-5 products owned/used2 or fewer products owned/used 76% 72% 63% 50% 52% 56% 50% 50% 49% 54% 56% 45% 45% 43% 42% 56% 48% 42% 42% 44% 49% 47% 41% 40% 46% 42% 41% Interest in improvement to the digital experience – by number of FS products Which areas of the current online/digital experience would you like to see your bank/financial institutions improve? 0% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 70% 60% 80% Additional levels of security Better online tools to help you find ways to save money, using your data Easier ways to sign in to view your account details Quicker ways to do transactions online Online advice personalized to you, utilising your own data Better online tools to help you make better financial decisions, using your data Better budgeting and goal-setting tools, using your data Improved mobile app Quicker ways to do transactions on a mobile %ofrespondentsstatingimrprovementsrequired % of respondents In the survey, expectations from the digital banking experience differed greatly between customers with simple financial needs (2 financial products or fewer) and those with complex requirements from their banks (5 financial products or more).
  • 19. 19 High-value customers want more from all touch -points of the digital banking experience Interestingly, the research found that those with the most complex financial needs – often the banks’ most profitable customers – had the highest expectations from the digital banking experience. Those with complex financial needs demanded more from almost all touch-points of the banking experience: Security: 76% Speed: 56% Ease: 50% wanted additional levels of security (vs. 71% average) wanted faster ways to transact online (vs. 53% average) wanted easier ways to log into their account (vs. 50% average) 56% wanted better online tools to help them save money, based on their data (vs. 53% average) 56% want better online tools to help them make financial decisions, based on their data (vs. 49% average) Money-saving tools: Guidance on financial decisions: This is a threat, as these demanding customers are the most likely to become frustrated with their current banking experience, leaving them wide open to offers from online-only competitors. In redesigning the digital customer experience, banks must take customer expectations and interests seriously, and tailor products to their needs.
  • 20. 20 Customers still value the branch experience Finally, the research showed that branches are still important to customers, but decreasing in significance as digital channels grow. When asked what mattered most to them when dealing with their bank, customers ranked the quality of the branch experience very highly: Though the battle for customers will be increasingly fought online, the branch remains significant – at least for now. As a result, improvements to the digital banking experience should include the branch, to provide seamless, platform-agnostic experiences that recognize the role the physical bank still plays in customers’ lives. Branch: Desktop/laptop: For 34%, the quality of the desktop/laptop experience mattered most Apps: 8% prioritized the quality of the smartphone/tablet app experience Telephone: For 6%, the quality of the telephone experience mattered most Mobile browsing: 5% prioritized the experience on a smartphone/tablet browser 48% put most importance on the quality of the branch experience
  • 22. 22 Banks face a major challenge when looking to redesign their digital offerings. The speed at which customer expectations are changing is faster than ever. As established technology companies deliver increasingly sophisticated experiences, customers are asking ever more from other digital experiences. While security, speed and ease remain central customer concerns, expectations from the digital banking experience are evolving so rapidly that banks are struggling to keep up. There is no silver bullet solution for banks, but one thing is clear – to fend off the threat from digital competitors, they must be able to respond more quickly to changing customer needs.
  • 23. 23 It is important to understand our research as a snapshot in time. In the UK, time spent with digital media eclipsed TV in 2013, and time spent on mobiles overtook desktop and laptop use in 20156 . Smartphone penetration in the UK went from 20% in 2010 to 72% in 20157 . In 2014 the British Banking Association said online banking apps were downloaded at a rate of 15,000 per day. In other words, it’s an understatement to say that the speed with which customer behaviors are changing is rapid. Our research shows that already, 7.5% of consumers think the app experience is the most important touchpoint in banking, while 5% think this of the mobile browsing experience. That might still seem like small numbers, but consider the following factors that suggest we are nearing an inflection point: • Many banks and online financial services companies we have spoken to now have more mobile traffic than desktop traffic. When you extrapolate those traffic trends, mobile will become the dominant bank touchpoint for customers in the next 3-5 years. • Mobile conversions and transaction sizes have historically underperformed against PC conversions8, due to customers being deterred by small screen sizes, awkward data entry and security concerns. This is all changing, especially for companies that exploit the speed and ease of apps9, as well as the advantages mobiles have in terms of authentication and data input options compared to the very limited PC. • The pace of innovation in mobile is starting to accelerate. Mobiles have gone from being limited PCs to something far more powerful. They bring many more interaction possibilities, such as beacons, notifications, deep-links, touch payments, and easier capture of personal data, including sensors, APIs and data availability. Over time, the smartphone will be far more than a simple tool for banking transactions – it will know you far better than any computer ever has, opening completely new possibilities for how we manage our money. Where are we headed? 6. eMarketer, UK adults spend more time on mobile devices than on PCs, April 2015 7. Statistica, Smartphone user penetration in the UK, 2015
  • 24. 24 Ultimately, what this means is that banks have to balance two different priorities On the one hand, banks need to better cater to digital natives who expect the whole journey to happen on their phone. This will also enable banks to experiment with what purely digital banking can become – and what the mass market will eventually want. Digital banking experiences today too often mimic the paper forms and processes of an analogue age, but there is no reason why this should continue to be the dominant design paradigm. Some banks are already working on rethinking parts of banking from the ground up, and finding ways to appeal to early adopters – for example, Barclays’ Pingit. However, they need to accelerate the speed at which they get these ideas to market in order to fend off the threat from digital competitors. On the other hand banks need to ensure everyone else also has an optimal experience, regardless of the channel through which they choose to engage. This introduces an awful lot of complexity, as there are now so many different ways to engage: different screen types, user journeys and need states.
  • 25. 25 Banks are now in a race to handle these dual prerogatives: finding ways to innovate while also building consistent omni-channel experiences. Both objectives face major obstacles. The digital insight gap Banks possess a wealth of traditional insight about their customers, but much of the data gathering banks do today was designed around a specific product or channel. Today’s customers rarely follow a linear journey – they jump between channels. Therefore, banks lack insight into the cross-channel decision journey – making it difficult to design experiences that respond to customer needs. As one bank told us, they understand what happens in the channel, not outside of it – they are not connecting data points across channels and therefore do not see the complete customer experience picture. Further, there is often a tendency to default to channels where there are established processes in place to handle customers, rather than the channels the customer wants to use. This causes a disconnect in how banks use channels when they communicate with customers, and how they track interactions – for instance, mailing a letter in response to an online interaction. Traditional customer metrics, such as satisfaction, loyalty and net promoter score, allow for simple performance tracking over time but have limited capacity for shedding light on changing customer expectations. Banks need new ways of understanding customer needs and differentiating between the various emotional need states that trigger the need for financial products. Unstructured data is becoming an increasingly important part of the puzzle and banks often lack the tools to process it. Obstacles to overcome
  • 26. 26 Banks have added on channels to engage with customers as they have appeared, but often as bolt-ons rather than integrating with existing operations. The consequence is that banks are poorly equipped to serve the same experience to customers who engage with them in more than one channel and who own more than one product. One company we have spoken to has six different CRM databases that don’t talk to each other. Add to that technology stacks that are 20 or more years old, built long before apps had been conceived, and you can see that the share of the banks’ digital budgets spent on design and innovation becomes a tiny percentage of the overall technology budget. This taxes banks when compared to start-ups that are operating with single-channel, single-product offerings and using technology stacks that are only a couple of years old which can be switched out as they scale. But IT isn’t the only piece of legacy that banks need to contend with. As one bank put it: “cultural change is half the battle in improving customer experience in a digital age - how do you get staff onboard?” As part of this, many banks are looking to create ‘lighthouse projects’ — innovative, high-visibility projects that show what’s possible, to make other staff say, “I want that”, and galvanize the desire for change. Risk mitigation Banks have traditionally used long design and development cycles to mitigate risk and deal with complexity, but these do not account for rapid changes in consumer behaviour and expectations – the challenge is that solutions are already outdated by the time they launch. Design and development cycles are measured in years compared to the months, or even weeks, that is the norm for start-ups. As one banker put it – “it is the challenge of turning around a supertanker – but we will have to adapt.” Legacy systems
  • 27. 27 Recommendations Beyond recommends five key ways for banks to meet the speed of change: 5 the harder it is to convert customers through a purely digital channel. While countless start-ups are trying to find the formula to automate this, humans are still needed. Banks could retool how branches deliver advice by arming their colleagues with the technology they need in-branch to give the customers the best of both worlds. Blend the physical and the digital Despite the growing significance of digital channels, branches are still important to customers. As a result, banks have an advantage if they can create seamless online and offline experiences that enhance the overall value they bring. Customers are growing ever more open to new providers and online-only offerings. Though this is a threat to banks, it’s also an opportunity for them to use their advantage – the physical branch – to retain customers. Consumers show a clear appetite for self-service, from using ATMs to making payments online, rather than having to use a human intermediary. As a result, branch visits have dropped 90% since 199510. However, when it comes to making financial decisions – especially when they have large potential consequences – we see consumers need assurance that they are making the right decisions. 10. Brett King, Bank 3.0, 2013
  • 28. 28 Use new data sources to map experiences and uncover points of friction Established technology companies like Amazon and Google benefit from massive amounts of behavioral data, which provides them with a deep understanding of their customers’ typical online activity. This allows them to create sophisticated digital experiences that anticipate decisions based on past actions. Google’s autocomplete function, which predicts what you are likely to be searching for, and suggests sentences to complete the search you started, is an example. They also extensively use fast and iterative user research to get continuous insight into the “why” behind what people do. To uncover points of friction and understand what needs to be improved, banks need to break down the customer journey using key insights built on behavioural data. Only by mapping out the end-to-end customer journey for all their customer types can a bank truly improve and personalize the experience. Partner for big ideas One way to get ahead of the game is through extensive ideation, utilizing partners in a different way to the traditional client-agency relationship. Bringing external partners in to collaborate on specific projects can get great results, especially if both teams are co-located. This tactic works best when separate product teams are given the freedom to operate independently from the core product design team to develop a transformational product set that can be brought to market quickly, then tested and rolled out. Customers want fast, easy and secure access to banking products that respond to their needs, and to provide this, banks need a wide funnel of ideas to pick from, and the freedom to think about what is possible. To keep up with the pace of change, banks must place strategic bets on innovative new business models and experiences – just as the disruptors do. Several global banking firms have already started doing this, with one third of fintech deals since 2009 having happened in 201511. 11. CB Insights, https://www.cbinsights.com/blog/banks-record-fin-tech-investment/, 2015
  • 29. 29 MVP Innovate incrementally through repatriation Incremental change is better than no change at all, particularly as customer expectations are evolving so rapidly. Instead of waiting for a major overhaul, it can be better to improve digital offerings more gradually. Once transformational adjacent products have been trialled successfully, banks can then repatriate the innovation into existing core products. This could be by segmenting the audience down further, providing new services for younger audiences that best fit their needs, moving the brand forward for future generations. Launch quickly and test A test-and-learn approach might be the antithesis of the way large banks work, seemingly at odds with habits of limiting risk. But, it is actually a better way of mitigating risks and ensuring better outcomes, as it enables the organization to optimize and learn faster, which can mean avoiding costly mistakes down the road. Product development approaches like the minimum viable product (MVP) present opportunities to change entrenched behaviors. MVPs are the most basic products that can go to market and have the highest return on investment relative to risk. They enable organizations to get rapid feedback on new offerings, which they can then iterate, and help avoid the development of products and features that do not meet customers’ needs. If banks can act on these principles, they will become truly indispensable to their If banks can act on these principles, they will become truly indispensable to their customers. If they cannot, they will struggle to survive in an increasingly competitive market.
  • 31. 31 Customers are as interested in financial offerings from tech brands as they are from banks • 57% of respondents are interested in financial offerings from PayPal –the most popular digital-only choice. Online-only banking services are widely accepted by US consumers • 57% of respondents would consider an online - only service for all their banking needs • This rose to 79% for payments and money transfer and 77% for current accounts • Those with complex financial needs (5 financial products or more) – often the banks’ most profitable customers – were even more receptive to online-only offerings (65% vs. 57%) Customers want improvements to the most basic areas of the digital banking experience • Security: 71% wanted additional levels of security • Speed: 53% wanted faster ways to transact online • Ease: 50% wanted easier ways to log into their account Beyond surveyed 1,011 US respondents, to assess consumer readiness for online-only banking and to discover what consumers want from the digital banking experience. The results were as follows:
  • 32. 32 Customers want personalized online tools • Money Saving Tools: 53% wanted better online tools to help them save money, based on their data • Guidance on Financial Descisions: 49% wanted better online tools to High-value customers want more from all touch-points of the digital banking experience • Security: 76% wanted additional levels of security (vs. 71% average) • Speed: 65% wanted faster ways to transact online (vs. 53% average) • Ease: 50% wanted easier ways to log into their account (vs. 50% average) • Money Saving Tools: 56% wanted better online tools to help them save money, based on their data (vs. 53% average) • Guidance on Financial Descisions: 56% wanted better online tools to help them make financial decisions, based on their data (vs. 49% average) Customers still value the branch experience • Branch: 48% put most importance on the quality of the branch experience • Desktop/laptop: For 34%, the quality of the desktop/laptop experience mattered most • Apps: 8% prioritised the quality of the smartphone/tablet app experience • Telephone: For 6%, the quality of the telephone experience mattered most • Mobile Browsing: 5% prioritized the experience on a smartphone/tablet browser
  • 33. 33 Beyond works with companies to create amazing connected experiences by making products more enjoyable, simpler and easy to use. Our mission is to remove friction from the customer journey and digitally design the experiences that define your brand. We are an experience design agency with studios in San Francisco, New York, London and Mountain View. About us Studios