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You are a Healthcare Designer

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You are a Healthcare Designer

  1. 1. YOU ARE A HEALTH CARE DESIGNER Fast Forward Medical Innovation Design Bootcamp
  2. 2. JAMA Pediatrics Unitio Lenovo DISCLOSURES
  3. 3. JOYCE LEE, MD, MPH www.doctorasdesigner.com Twitter: @joyclee NANCY BENOVICH GILBY Professor of Entrepreneurship, UM School of Information
  4. 4. JOYCE LEE, MD, MPH NANCY BENOVICH GILBY MARK NEWMAN
  5. 5. CO+LAB OBJECTIVES 1 To develop digital health prototypes using participatory design, including mobile context-aware applications, and artificial and virtual reality technologies To offer interdisciplinary learning experiences for students, including interaction with patients and caregivers and technology skills development To conduct design research to gain insights related to working with technology within the context of health. 2 3
  6. 6. AGENDA Introduction to Design Understand the 5 basic steps of Design Thinking Apply design thinking to create a prototype for health Reflect on the creations of the entire group and the process
  7. 7. WHAT IS DESIGN? “Purpose, planning, or intention that exists or is thought to exist behind an action, fact, or material object.”
  8. 8. “Can I park here?” “For how long?” Nikki Sylianteng @toparkornottopark
  9. 9. Nikki Sylianteng @toparkornottopark
  10. 10. WHO IS A DESIGNER?
  11. 11. “Folk in black turtlenecks and designer glasses working on small things like the Apple Watch” -Tim Brown
  12. 12. Clinician, QI Director, Researcher
  13. 13. YOU ARE A DESIGNER
  14. 14. DESIGN IS A MINDSET “Learning to design is learning to see” -Oliver Reichenstein
  15. 15. The needle is opposite to the cap Design Flaw #1
  16. 16. >15,000 Unintentional injections from Epi-Pens in the US between 1994-2007
  17. 17. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 < 6 6-1218-64 Total 13-17 >64 Unintentional Injections with Epinephrine auto-injectors Simons, 2010
  18. 18. Greenberg, 2010 “Despite instructions rendered on the package insert, a large number of health care professionals including nurses, paramedics, and physicians inadvertently self-inject while attempting to administer the EpiPen to patients. One recent report chronicles a 6-year experience at a single US poison center that fielded 365 epinephrine injections to the hand.”
  19. 19. Design Flaw #2 Life or death is stressful! Don’t make me think!
  20. 20. Design Flaw #3 It’s an awkward size, & doesn’t fit in your pockets
  21. 21. Blackberry iPhone
  22. 22. The cap & needle are at the same end Redesign #1
  23. 23. It’s like Siri and talks to you! Redesign #2
  24. 24. It’s thinner and shorter! Redesign #3
  25. 25. It reminds me when to refill
  26. 26. The Paternalism of Medicine
  27. 27. “patients frequently do not understand how and when to use [the epi-pen].” Sicherer, 2011 Blaming the Patient
  28. 28. “patients frequently do not understand how and when to use [the epi-pen].” Sicherer, 2011 The needle is opposite to the cap Patient Problem or Design Problem?
  29. 29. “Children had only used their EpiPen device in 29% of recurrent anaphylaxis reactions. This is perhaps unsurprising because a fear of needles/injections is common” Sicherer, 2011 Blaming the Patient
  30. 30. “Children had only used their EpiPen device in 29% of recurrent anaphylaxis reactions. This is perhaps unsurprising because a fear of needles/injections is common” Sicherer, 2011 Life or death is stressful! Don’t make me think! Patient Problem or Design Problem?
  31. 31. “patients often forget [the device], allow it to expire” Sicherer, 2011 Blaming the Patient
  32. 32. “patients often forget [the device], allow it to expire” Sicherer, 2011 It’s an awkward size, & doesn’t fit in your pockets Patient Problem or Design Problem?
  33. 33. Patient problems are really healthcare system design problems
  34. 34. Fix the Design and It’s No Longer the Patient’s Problem
  35. 35. Let Patients Design and they will Fix the Problem!
  36. 36. 75% of children fail achieve recommended blood sugar goals in Type 1 Diabetes
  37. 37. 75% of health care providers/systems fail to help children achieve recommended blood sugar goals in Type 1 Diabetes
  38. 38. Healthcare: “Fax us your numbers!” Kid: “Mom, what’s a fax? Is it compatible with Snapchat?”
  39. 39. Some people wonder why almost no one uploads their pump data… I think I know why: because getting it to work can be like CRAWLING. THROUGH. BROKEN. GLASS. @HowardLook
  40. 40. DESIGN IS A PROCESS It’s a form of Problem Solving
  41. 41. HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN “An approach that puts human (end- user) needs, capabilities, and behavior first, then designs to accommodate those needs, capabilities, and ways of behaving”
  42. 42. THE END-USER IN HEALTHCARE It’s patients and caregivers, NOT doctors or nurses, clinic managers, insurers, administrators, or even specialty organizations.
  43. 43. EMPATHY Understand a problem before solving it
  44. 44. DEFINE A patient-defined problem
  45. 45. IDEATE Collaborative, creative brainstorming
  46. 46. PROTOTYPE Sketch, draw, glue, code
  47. 47. www.diabetesemoticons.com
  48. 48. WHYAPPLYDESIGN TO HEALTHCARE?
  49. 49. Billion dollar valuations 42 design firms have been acquired since 2004 50% have been acquired within the last year with Accenture, Deloitte, IBM, Google, Facebook as the most acquisitive
  50. 50. 72
  51. 51. Empathy Define the Problem Ideate Share & Capture Feedback Prototype Test
  52. 52. How might we design the ideal clinic visit experience? How might we design a tool or experience to support for health, wellness, and disease ? How might we design tailored healthcare to our patients individual/specific needs?
  53. 53. Understand the problem before trying to solve it. EMPATHY
  54. 54. Interview your client about their experiences with healthcare, wellness, and disease management. Ask open-ended questions: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How? 5 min per person
  55. 55. Address the client’s specific problems and needs. DEFINE
  56. 56. Define the problem. Capture your findings and take a stand on how to address your client’s needs. I was surprised to learn… The client needs a way to… 4 min individually
  57. 57. Sketch solutions for your client’s needs. IDEATE
  58. 58. Generate ideas to test. Sketch out solutions to your partner’s needs. Be messy, be creative, get to a good idea. 8 min individually
  59. 59. What does your client think of your solutions? SHARE
  60. 60. Share your solutions and gather feedback. This feedback will shape your next iteration. Understand your clients’ concerns and keep their feedback in mind. 5 min per person
  61. 61. Sketch your best idea. Remember your client’s feedback! PROTOTYPE
  62. 62. Prototype your solution. Reflect on your partner’s feedback and sketch your best ideas. How can you best serve the client’s needs? 8 min individually
  63. 63. What could be improved? TEST
  64. 64. Test your new prototype. Share your prototype with your partner and get feedback on the outcome of your design process. What worked? What could be improved? 5 min per person
  65. 65. What did you come up with? REPORT OUT
  66. 66. Health Care Designers! THANK YOU www.healthdesignby.us www.doctorasdesigner.com Dr. Joyce Lee @joyclee joyclee@med.umich.edu Nancy Benovich Gilby nabgilby@umich.edu

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