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Maths workshop

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Maths workshop

  1. 1. April 2014 Every Child Counts Mathematics in the PYP
  2. 2. • Learning mathematics: the PYP philosophy • How children learn mathematics • The written curriculum • The taught curriculum • The assessed curriculum Primary Parent Workshop
  3. 3. The PYP Definition of Curriculum
  4. 4. The power of mathematics for describing and analysing the world around us is such that it has become a highly effective tool for solving problems. It is also recognized that students can appreciate the intrinsic fascination of mathematics and explore the world through its unique perceptions. Learning Mathematics – The PYP Philosophy
  5. 5. In the same way that students describe themselves as “authors” or “artists”, a school’s programme should also provide students with the opportunity to see themselves as “mathematicians”, where they enjoy and are enthusiastic when exploring and learning about mathematics. Learning Mathematics – The PYP Philosophy
  6. 6. It is important that learners acquire mathematical understanding by constructing their own meaning through ever-increasing levels of abstraction, starting with exploring their own personal experiences, understandings and knowledge. How children learn mathematics
  7. 7. Additionally, it is fundamental to the philosophy of the PYP that, since it is to be used in real-life situations, mathematics needs to be taught in relevant, realistic contexts, rather than by attempting to impart a fixed body of knowledge directly to students. How children learn mathematics can be described using the following stages (see figure 1). How children learn mathematics
  8. 8. How children learn mathematics
  9. 9. constructing meaning transferring meaning applying with understanding *See handout How children learn mathematics
  10. 10. The PYP Definition of Curriculum
  11. 11. *Please see handout – Primary Mathematics Scope and Sequence
  12. 12. The PYP Definition of Curriculum
  13. 13. Learning Outcomes: Sort or match objects and talk about sorting. Explore the language and value of numbers 1 to 10 using concrete materials
  14. 14. Learning Outcome: Relate addition to combining two groups and subtraction to taking away
  15. 15. Learning Outcome: Understand what each digit represents in two and three digit numbers; partition into hundreds, tens and ones.
  16. 16. Learning Outcome: Find halves, quarters, thirds, fifths, eighths and tenths of shapes and numbers.
  17. 17. Learning Outcome: Find halves, quarters, thirds, fifths, eighths and tenths of shapes and numbers.
  18. 18. Learning Outcome: Find halves, quarters, thirds, fifths, eighths and tenths of shapes and numbers.
  19. 19. Learning Outcome: Measure angles; describe and estimate the size of angles and classify them as acute, right or obtuse
  20. 20. Learning Outcome: Measure angles; describe and estimate the size of angles and classify them as acute, right or obtuse
  21. 21. Learning Outcome: Identify relationships between numbers and make generalized statements using words, symbols and letters, e.g. the second number is twice the first number plus 5 (n, 2n +5)
  22. 22. Learning Outcome: Read and plot coordinates in all four quadrants
  23. 23. Learning Outcome: Record using non standard units of measure
  24. 24. Learning Outcome: Record using non standard units of measure
  25. 25. Learning Outcome: Record using non standard units of measure
  26. 26. Learning Outcome: Sort and describe the properties of 2D shapes.
  27. 27. Learning Outcome: Sort and describe the properties of 2D shapes.
  28. 28. Learning Outcome: Record using non standard units of measure
  29. 29. Learning Outcome: Sort and re-sort objects using one attribute at a time. Sort a random collection and explain own sorting.
  30. 30. Learning Outcome: Use concrete materials to demonstrate understanding of the language and value of numbers 1-20
  31. 31. Learning Outcome: Estimate, measure and compare lengths, weights and capacities using standard units
  32. 32. Learning Outcome: Understand what each digit represents in two and three digit numbers; partition into hundreds, tens and ones.
  33. 33. Learning Outcome: Use Carroll, Venn and Tree diagrams to sort numbers or objects using one criterion.
  34. 34. Learning Outcome: Add and subtract a single digit to and from a two-digit number.
  35. 35. Learning Outcome: Compare lengths and weights by direct comparison, then by using uniform non- standard units. Use comparative language, e.g. longer, shorter, heavier and lighter.
  36. 36. The PYP Definition of Curriculum
  37. 37. Diagnostic Diagnostic assessment can help identify students’ current knowledge of a subject, their skill sets and capabilities, and to clarify misconceptions before teaching takes place Knowing students’ strengths and weaknesses can helps teachers better plan what to teach and how to teach it. Assessment
  38. 38. Formative Formative assessment provides feedback and information during the instructional process, while learning is taking place, and while learning is occurring. Assessment
  39. 39. Summative Summative assessment takes place after the learning has been completed and provides information and feedback that sums up the teaching and learning process. Typically, no more formal learning is taking place at this stage, other than incidental learning which might take place through the completion of projects and assignments. Assessment
  40. 40. Assessment Strategies and Tools
  41. 41. ‘Testing is a small part of assessment. It needs to be part of the picture. A good test has a role to play. The language that we like to use is, it's an audit. It's a snapshot. You don't run your business for the audit. You want more than a snapshot, you want a whole family album. But the audit and the snapshot have a place in the larger picture.’ Grant Wiggins - Defining Assessment Distinction between ‘testing’ and ‘assessment’
  42. 42. • Standardised testing is one small part of a comprehensive process of assessment • We use standardised tests with the understanding that they are simplistic and generic but they also provide quick and easy way to measure basic skills in core subjects • Teachers do not ‘teach to the test’ Assessment at KICS
  43. 43. • For tracking student progress over time • To highlight strengths and weaknesses in curricular provision • As a performance indicator of teaching and learning – class, year group or school • To compare cohorts of students (EAL, gender, nationality etc.) • To provide an external benchmark for the purposes of quality assurance How test data is used
  44. 44. • Provide standardised score and percentile ranking • Completed at beginning and end of year • Results are automatically delivered as soon as tests are complete • Instant detailed diagnostic reports GL Online Assessments
  45. 45. Standardised Score
  46. 46. Percentile Rank
  47. 47. UK National Curriculum Level
  48. 48. Standardised Results indicating Value Added from class mean average scores Class September 2010 June 2011 Value Added A 89 101 +12 B 99 111 +12 C 93 103 +10 D 98 107 +9 E 100 107 +7 F 102 108 +6 G 94 100 +6 H 91 95 +4 I 94 97 +3 J 103 105 +2
  49. 49. Data can be used to monitor EAL groupings
  50. 50. Data can be broken down into nationalities
  51. 51. 85 90 95 100 105 110 115 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 StandardisedScore Year Level UK Expected Expected IS Results with high EAL Population
  52. 52. Raising the profile of Mathematics at KICS
  53. 53. Raising the profile – ECIS Maths Quest Berlin

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