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Digital disruption - Dive in to thrive

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How are disruptive digital technologies impacting companies? What role should CIOs play in responding to these issues and opportunities?

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Digital disruption - Dive in to thrive

  1. 1. Digital disruption– dive in to thrive Highlights of H1 2014 CIO Center of Excellence Survey
  2. 2. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 2 Summary – Key findings Majority of companies are concerned about digital disruption (i.e., competitive threats from digitization) but few are prepared to address it Just 36 percent of clients profiled have a digital business strategy ■ only eight percent have one that is enterprise-wide For companies that have a digital business strategy, the CEO and CIO are typically involved, but neither usually leads the effort Challenges in responding to digital disruption include: ■ lack of vision ■ limitations of IT systems ■ lack of critical skills
  3. 3. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 3 The Research Global, 21% North America, 37% South America, 5% Europe, 40% Middle East, Africa, 2% Asia Pac, 13% KPMG is pleased to release the findings from its KPMG 2H14 CIO Advisory Global Centre of Excellence Pulse survey. The Pulse surveys provide insights into trends and projections in end-user organizations’ use and management of information technology. The learnings are gleaned globally from KPMG International (KPMGI) member firms’ (KPMG firms’) advisors, who work closely with end-user organizations that are actively employing IT to impact business outcomes. In October 2014 we surveyed KPMG IT Management Consultants with regards to the impact that Digital Disruption was having on their clients. ■ We collected responses from 118 consultants from 30 different countries. ■ 85 percent of respondents were Partner/Director level. Source: KPMG Global CIO Advisory Pulse Survey 2014
  4. 4. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 4 Section 1: CIO Trends
  5. 5. What are the top CIO information technology priorities for 2014? What are the top CIO business priorities for 2014? Source: KPMG Global CIO Advisory Pulse Survey 2014 © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 5 Digital disruption – a cause for concern for most organizations 44 16 10 9 7 7 Improve operational efficiency and reduce costs Develop flexible but resilient IT architecture Leverage cloud technology Simplify IT Re-engineer the sourcing strategy Invest in and improve cybersecurity 28 22 16 13 11 11 Reduce business operating costs Automate core business processes Increase enterprise growth Attract and retain new customers Leverage Big Data and analytics Create new products and services (innovation) ■ Improving operational efficiency and reduce costs remains CIOs top technology priority. – Other priorities will contribute to lower costs, for example, cloud technology can reduce overall infrastructure costs and simplify IT to reduce operational costs. ■ The number two priority focusing on resilience and flexibility reflects the growing demand for “always on” systems as an increasing number of business transactions and customer engagement moves to an online venue. ■ Clearly, CIOs have cost on their minds as their top business priority is also cost focused as they work to leverage technology investments to reduce business operating costs. Bottom Line: We expect that for most organizations cost cutting will reach a point of diminishing returns. Increasingly the business requires IT to support growth which may actually require spending more on IT and not less.
  6. 6. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 6 Section 2: Awareness and Readiness
  7. 7. How concerned is your client about digital disruption? Source: KPMG Global CIO Advisory Pulse Survey 2014 © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 7 Digital disruption – a cause for concern for most organizations The majority, 58 percent, of respondents are concerned or very concerned about digital disruption. Digital disruption concern 6% 25% 33% 24% 13% Extremely concerned Very concerned Concerned Somewhat concerned Not concerned Digital disruption may threaten current businesses – but it also creates opportunities and must be addressed with some action: ■ Understanding the impact that digital disruption will have on an organization’s products, services, and business model is the first step. ■ Developing a digital business strategy, acquiring the necessary digital skills, and getting the organization to buy into the required changes represent the next steps.
  8. 8. ■ only 8 percent have one that is enterprise-wide 1. defining what digital disruption means to the organization at all levels 2. enumerating its threats and opportunities 3. identifying ways to meet implementation challenges and requirements © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 8 Most companies do not have a digital business strategy Yes, enterprise-wide, 8% Yes, in one or more business units, 28% No, but currently working on one, 26% No, but thinking about one, 29% No, and no plans at this time for one, 8% 36 percent of companies have a digital business strategy for one or more business units Designing the strategy involves: Result is enterprise-wide digital technology roadmap with sub-strategies for different needs of: ■ business units, geographies and functions ■ different classes of employees, customers and business partners Source: KPMG Global CIO Advisory Pulse Survey 2014
  9. 9. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 9 CEOs and CIOs involved but not leading the effort  For companies that have a digital business strategy, most CIOs (58 percent) and almost half of the CEOs (43 percent) are involved or very involved  Given the huge impact of digital disruption and the organizational change required for transformation, strong executive leadership is critical for success. Bottom Line: Merely supporting the effort is not enough … involvement is paramount to success
  10. 10. ■ Responding to digital disruption involves mastering and implementing new technologies that require new skills – 65 percent of respondents cited a lack of critical skills as the number one challenge ■ Limitations of existing IT systems (cited by 64 percent) impede the ability to quickly develop and implement IT solutions and integrate them with existing systems ■ Cultural resistance (56 percent) needs to be overcome for businesses to learn new behaviors and master new technologies ■ No easy or quick solutions – but without a clear vision (55 percent), tackling the other challenges is impossible © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 10 Skills and technologies top the list of challenges Bottom Line: CIOs need a clear view of what digital disruption is, when it will impact their business, and how to leverage disruptive technologies
  11. 11. To what degree is your client deploying the following digital technologies to transform the business? 1% 9% 6% 13% 13% Cloud based services Social media Mobile apps Big data/analytics Internet of Things (IoT) ■ Cloud based services are the clear leader at 51 percent, followed by mobile apps (46 percent), social media (45 percent), and big data/analytics (38 percent) ■ Surprisingly, 32 percent are not using social media ■ More deployment is expected as digital technologies mature, especially social media and big data © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 11 Cloud, social media, mobile apps and big data lead in deployment 0% 5% 18% 23% 33% 40% 36% 33% 9% 4% 20% 25% 14% 16% 35% 30% 36% 26% 21% 32% 42% 6% 15% 32% 21% Enterprise app stores Using broadly Using some Piloting Exploring Not using Bottom Line: As mobile technologies proliferate, enterprise app stores will probably grow more popular Source: KPMG Global CIO Advisory Pulse Survey 2014
  12. 12. To what degree is your client organization using agile development processes? ■ Today’s digital world requires agility – the ability to adapt and respond quickly to internal and external events ■ Traditional plan, build, run IT operating model is too slow, costs too much and often misfires ■ Agile methodologies are gaining traction – adopting them can go a long way in reducing development cycles – Almost 70 percent of respondents now use agile development processes – 16 percent use them on over half of their projects and 3 percent on all projects Source: KPMG Global CIO Advisory Pulse Survey 2014 © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 12 Agile development processes are now widely used 3% 16% 28% 23% 15% 16% On all projects On more than 50% of all projects On at least 25% of projects On a few projects Don't use agile Don't know Bottom Line: With increasing pressures on IT to deliver faster, cheaper, better, usage of agile processes will continue to grow rapidly
  13. 13. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 13 Section 3: Organization and Impact
  14. 14. ■ Responding to digital disruption requires new skills and capabilities ■ IT organizations with strong capabilities in the 8 areas above are more likely to execute their digital strategies successfully ■ Organizations have room to improve their capabilities across the board – IT governance (23 percent) and sourcing and vendor management (20 percent) are the two highest rated capabilities, but there still remains great opportunity to improve. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 14 IT organizations need to upgrade their capabilities Bottom Line: With fierce competition in the labor market, organizations need to be smart about how they internally develop and externally acquire the skills they need
  15. 15. Do you believe that the quality of the CIO/CMO relationship is important to the success of digital transformation? 56% 19% 7% 4% 13% Yes, direct Yes No moderate Yes minor How would you characterize the CIO/CMO (or most senior marketing executive) relationship in your client organizations? 5% 29% 19% 15% 6% 24% Don’t know ■ A good relationship between the CIO and CMO is important to successful digital transformations – Over half (55 percent) agreed that the quality of the CIO/CMO relationship had a direct impact ■ Few organizations believe that there is a high quality relationship between their CIO and CMO – 21 percent said that the relationship was good or great – 34 percent said that it was weak or non-existent Source: KPMG Global CIO Advisory Pulse Survey 2014 © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 15 CIO/CMO relationship is key to digital success Non-existant Weak Average Good Great N/A/Don't know Bottom Line: As digital initiatives are increasingly driven by marketing functions, collaboration between the CIO and CMO takes on increasing importance to ensure IT investments align with overall enterprise goals and objectives.
  16. 16. © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 16 Section 4: Recommendations
  17. 17. 01 © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 17 Dealing with digital disruption – Recommendations for CIOs The strategy should be enterprise-wide, with sub-strategies that account for varying needs across business units, geographies, functional areas and for different classes of employees, customers and business partners Educate other C level executives and the board about digital disruption, current and emerging disruptive technologies, and the opportunities available Articulate what digital disruption means to the organization at all levels and detail its threats, opportunities, challenges and requirements Put a C level executive – such as a chief digital officer (CDO) or someone functioning in that role – in charge of defining and executing this strategy Create a digital business strategy
  18. 18. 02 © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 18 Dealing with digital disruption – Recommendations for CIOs Foster strong relations with the CMO and chief digital officer (if the role exists) Identify specific areas for improvement in the IT function— such as IT systems limitations and skills gaps — and define programs to remediate and address Prioritize the most important IT digital initiative capabilities to improve —such as IT governance — and define programs to remediate and address Take an active role in defining and driving the implementation of this digital business strategy
  19. 19. 03 Create a dedicated incubator or lab type environment where new technologies and © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. 19 Dealing with digital disruption – Recommendations for CIOs Develop a mechanism to incent collaboration between IT and the business for developing digital initiatives ideas can be quickly developed tested Maintain a separate R&D budget to support innovating digital initiatives Ensure you have a process in place to share digital best practices across the organization
  20. 20. kpmg.com/socialmedia kpmg.com/app © 2014 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. The information contained herein is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Although we endeavour to provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act on such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of the particular situation. Matt Bishop Principal, KPMG LLP Global CIO Advisory Leader T: 1-214-840-2749 E: mbishop@kpmg.com Marc Snyder Advisory Managing Director CIO Advisory, KPMG LLP T: 1-978-807-0522 E: msnyder@kpmg.com Visit kpmg.com/thrivingamiddisruption to learn more about how CIOs need to respond to disruption.

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