Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Episode 5 lotus eaters (3) (1)

AnneMarie's Slides

  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Episode 5 lotus eaters (3) (1)

  1. 1. Episode 5 Lotus-Eaters
  2. 2. He crossedTownsend Street, passed the frowning face of Bethel… (U.5.10-11) Bloom has turned to his right at the foot of Lime Street and has walked west along Hanover Street East, which gives intoTownsend Street. Bloom turns left (south), crossesTownsend Street, and walks south through Lombard Street
  3. 3. InWestland Row he halted before the window of the Belfast and OrientalTea Company (U.5.17-18) Extends south from Lombard StreetWest
  4. 4. InWestland Row he halted before the window of the Belfast and OrientalTea Company (U.5.17-18) 6Westland Row
  5. 5. Ah yes, in the dead sea floating on his back, reading a book with a parasol open. (U.5.38-9) Because the waters of the Dead Sea contain approximately twenty-five percent salt in solution, their specific gravity is approximately 1.16; thus, a human body floats easily on the surface.
  6. 6. Mr Bloom gazed across the road at the outsider drawn up before the door of the Grosnover. (U.5.98-99) Also called a “jaunting car”; a two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle on which the driver faces ahead, but the passengers, their seats at right angles to the axle with a well for luggage in between, sit with their backs to each other and thus face “outside”.
  7. 7. Mr Bloom gazed across the road at the outsider drawn up before the door of the Grosnover. (U.5.98-99) A then-fashionable hotel at 5Westland Row.
  8. 8. Girl in Eustace street hallway Monday was it settling her garter (U.5.133-34) In central Dublin south of the Liffey, approximately one-half mile west of Bloom’s present position inWestland Row.
  9. 9. They drove off towards the Loop Line bridge, her rich gloved hand on the steel grip. (U.5.138) The City of Dublin Junction Railway (the Loop Line) linked the Dublin and Southeastern Railway terminus inWestland Row with the Amiens Street station, the terminus of the Great Western Railway north of the Liffey.The Loop Line is bridged over Westland Row; thus, “they” drive north upWestland Row.
  10. 10. She’s going to sing at a swagger affair in the Ulster Hall, Belfast, on the twentyfifth. (U.5.151-52) A concert room and hall for public meetings built in 1862, seating 2,500 people “with all the modern improvements”; in south-central Belfast, eighty-five miles north and slightly east of Dublin.
  11. 11. Mr Bloom, strolling towards Brunswick street, smiled. (U.5.183) Great Brunswick Street, now called Pearse Street. Bloom walks north along Westland Row and then turns right (east) along Great Brunswick Street.
  12. 12. Clery’s Summer Sale. No, he’s going on straight. (U.5.194) A major department store, 21-27 Sackville Street Lower (now O’Connell Street), a shopping district in the center of Dublin, north of the Liffey.
  13. 13. And Ristori inVienna.What is this the right name is? (U.5.199-200) Adelaide Ristori (1822-1906), the Marquesa Capranica del Grillo (after 1847), was an Italian actress celebrated for her tragic roles. A version of Leah was “adapted expressly for Mme Ristori,” and though there is no available record, she undoubtedly did perform it inVienna.
  14. 14. He passed the cabman’s shelter. (U.5.223) Cabman’s Shelter and Coffee Stand on Great Brunswick Street between Cumberland Street South and Westland Row.
  15. 15. Those two sluts that night in the Coombe, linked together in the rain. (U.5.279-280) A street in south-central Dublin, and also the rather dilapidated area around St. Patrick’s Cathedral (Protestant). It was once a fashionable and thriving quarter in the city.
  16. 16. A well, stone cold like the hole in the wall at Ashtown (U.5.296-97) Ashtown is on the north side of Phoenix Park, adjacent to the gate that led to theViceregal Lodge; hence the district’s association with bribery at election time.
  17. 17. Going under the railway arch he took out the envelope, tore it swiftly in shreds (U.55.300-301) Beneath Westland Row station; the arch supports the elevated tracks of the Dublin and Southeastern Railway.
  18. 18. He had reached the open backdoor of All Hallows. (U.5.318) Or St.Andrew’s, a Roman Catholic church at 46 Westland Row. Bloom enters the church from its rear porch in Cumberland Street.
  19. 19. Hospice for the dying.They don’t seem to chew it. (U.5.351) Our Lady’s Hospice for the Dying at Harold’s Cross, south of Dublin, maintained by the Roman Catholic Sisters of Charity “for those whose illness is likely to terminate fatally, within a limited period.”
  20. 20. That fellow that turned queen’s evidence on the invincibles he used to receive the, Carey was his name, the communion every morning. (U.5.378-9) James Carey (1845-83), a builder and Dublin town councillor, apparently pious and public-spirited, became in 1881 one of the leaders of the Dublin branch of the Invincibles.Arrested after the Phoenix Park murders, he turned queen’s evidence during the trial in February 1883, and his comrades were hanged. In July he attempted (with English help) to escape to South Africa, but he was recognized and shot on shipboard by Patrick O’Donnell, who was, of course, hanged for his pains.
  21. 21. Makes it more aristocratic than for example if he drank what they are used to Guinness’s porter or some temperance beverage Wheatley’s Dublin hop bitters or Cantrell and Cochrane’s ginger ale (aromatic). (U.5.387-89) Dublin’s (and Ireland’s and Europe’s) largest brewery (stout and Dublin porter), and one of the most famous. In 1904 it occupied about forty acres in the southwest quadrant of Dublin and was the city’s largest industry.
  22. 22. Old Glynn he knew how to make that instrument talk, the vibrato: fifty pounds a year they say he had in Gardiner street. (U.5.394-97) That is, in the Church of St. Francis Xavier, just east and slightly north from Bloom’s house in Eccles Street.
  23. 23. Ah yes, the last time. Sweny’s in Lincoln Place. (U.5.463) F.W. Sweny, dispensing chemists (pharmacy), 1 Lincoln Place, a street that enters the southern end of Westland Row (where Bloom is) from the west.
  24. 24. Hamilton Long’s, founded in the year of the flood. (U.5.665) Hamilton, Long & Co., Ltd., state apothecaries, perfumers, and manufacturers of mineral waters, had several shops in and around Dublin.The one Bloom has in mind is at 107 Grafton Street, just north of St. Stephen’s Green.
  25. 25. Huguenot churchyard near there.Visit some day. (U.5.465-66) At 10 Merrion Row, east of St. Stephen’s Green about one-third mile south of Bloom’s present position.Three congregations of French Protestant refugees flourished in Dublin in the seventeenth century.They were assigned special burying places, the principal one being the one Bloom intends to visit “some day.”
  26. 26. Hammam.Turkish. (U.5.502) The Hammam Family Hotel andTurkish Baths, 11-12 Sackville (now O’Connell) Street Upper.
  27. 27. Cyclist doubled up like a cod in a pot (U.5.551-52) • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFUTHcjiZGo • After the song “Johnny, I Hardly KnewYe.” Johnny’s Peggy sings the song as Johnny returns crippled from the wars. Chorus: “Wild drums and guns, and guns and drums,/The enemy fairly slew ye;/
  28. 28. Still Captain Buller broke a window in the Kildare street club with a slog to square leg. (U.5.560-61) At the entrance of Kildare Street across fromTrinity College Park.The club was fashionable and expensive, and its membership was dominated by wealthy Irish landlords well known for their pro-English sentiments. It was reputedly the only place in Dublin where one could get decent caviar.

    Soyez le premier à commenter

    Identifiez-vous pour voir les commentaires

AnneMarie's Slides

Vues

Nombre de vues

597

Sur Slideshare

0

À partir des intégrations

0

Nombre d'intégrations

66

Actions

Téléchargements

6

Partages

0

Commentaires

0

Mentions J'aime

0

×