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Getting Things Done Review and Summary

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Getting Things Done Review and Summary

  1. 1. • Group No. 10 Sonali Gupta PGP30107 | Suhani Kejriwal PGP30109 | Vartika Jaiswal PGP30116 | Anupam Dey PGP30363 | Yatin Bhardwaj PGP30417
  2. 2. What’s Your Biggest Problem???
  3. 3. Too much to do and so little time…
  4. 4. Welcome to Getting Things Done “WARNING: Reading Getting Things Done can be hazardous to your old habits of procrastination.” - Carola Endicot Director, Quality Resources, New England Medical Centre
  5. 5. David Allen • A management consultant and executive coach • Called a personal productivity guru • Published Getting Things Done in 2001 “Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.” - David Allen
  6. 6. What Getting Things Done gives you More Energy Be Maximally Efficient Confident Being Present in Moment More Clarity in Thoughts Being More Relaxed
  7. 7. A New Practice for a New Reality The true challenge is to determine what to do with ambiguous tasks and projects
  8. 8. A New Practice for a New Reality Too much "stuff" stored in a person’s short-term memory can blow a fuse. Conscious mind is a focusing tool, not a storage place.
  9. 9. A New Practice for a New Reality Free yourself of the "open loops"
  10. 10. A New Practice for a New Reality David Allen says by “Horizontal focus”
  11. 11. A New Practice for a New Reality Write down the outcomes you wish to achieve For every outcome, determine the "next physical action" to move the situation forward Remind and Review regularly
  12. 12. A New Practice for a New Reality Make your “mind like water”, to get things done
  13. 13. The Five Stages of Mastering Workflow Capture • Clean your head and capture everything in a container Clarify • For each item check what’s the next action Organize • Plan the next actions Reflect • Review your lists of actions and reminders daily Engage • Making choices what and how to act next
  14. 14. 1. Purpose and Principles: Asking the question “Why”- to define success, create decision-making criteria, align resources, motivate, clarifying focus and expand options The Five Phases of Project Planning
  15. 15. The Five Phases of Project Planning 2. Envision an Outcome: Clarity and focus about ones vision and outcomes helps ones brain’s reticular activating system (RAS) to start making one aware of how it can happen WHAT?
  16. 16. 3. Brainstorming: Clarity and focus about ones vision and outcomes helps ones brain’s reticular activating system (RAS) to start making one aware of how it can happen INTERNALLY EXTERNALLY Eg Mind mapping, Whiteboard The Five Phases of Project Planning
  17. 17. The Five Phases of Project Planning (cont…) 3. Brainstorming: Keys to good brainstorming: DON’T a) Judge b) Challenge c) Evaluate d) criticize
  18. 18. The Five Phases of Project Planning (cont…) 4. Organizing: Identify major pieces, sort into either components, sequences or priority, detail out, determine next steps
  19. 19. The Five Phases of Project Planning (cont…) 5. Next Actions: Identify actions to be taken now leaving aside the dependent ones
  20. 20. Setting Up Time, Space and Tools 1. Setting Aside Time: Smaller Chunks for a couple of days Large chunk of Uninterrupted time eg weekend or holiday
  21. 21. Setting Up Time, Space and Tools 2. Setting up the Space: Set up space at home, work and in transit. Central Cockpit of Control a) Writing Surface b) Room c) Phone d) Computer e) Stacking Trays f) Working file drawers g) Paper h) Writing Instrument
  22. 22. Setting Up Time, Space and Tools 3. Tools: THINGS REQUIRED a) Stacking paper tray b) Plain paper c) Paper-handling supplies d) Automatic labeler e) File folders f) Calendar g) Trash/recycling bins h) Planner
  23. 23. Setting Up Time, Space and Tools 4. Filing System Filling system at hand distance from workplace Only one filling system “Where could item be?” Should have 2- 3 possible answers only Quick item filling, less than a minute Purge filling system once a year
  24. 24. Collection: Corralling Your “Stuff” What needs to be collected How to collect it most effectively Collections
  25. 25. Collection: Corralling Your “Stuff” Collection Tools Physical In-Basket Paper-based note-taking devices E mail Electronic note- taking devices Voice-recording devices
  26. 26. Collection: Corralling Your “Stuff” Physical: Gather all physical things you need to process: paperwork, business cards, notes, etc. Transform all items into discrete items of work Transform into physical form that can be put in a basket or work stack If it does not fit on the stack, label the item on a piece of paper and put it on the 'work stack'
  27. 27. Collection: Corralling Your “Stuff” Can create a separate 'emergency stack' if need be
  28. 28. Collection: Corralling Your “Stuff” Mental: Do a mental mind sweep of everything one needs to process, including professional and personal commitments Psychic RAM : to uncover anything that may be residing in one’s mental space
  29. 29. Clarifying: Getting “In” to Empty Collect everything Identify each item Decide what to do with each of the items in the "in" box
  30. 30. Clarifying: Getting “In” to Empty Put the top item first (FIFO mostly) Never put everything back into “in”
  31. 31. Clarifying: Getting “In” to Empty Is the task actionable? Trash Not of any use Incubate Someday/May be list Reference Retrievable when required No
  32. 32. Clarifying: Getting “In” to Empty Is the task actionable? Do it (when action takes <2 min) Defer it (to the appropriate person) Delegate it (do it later) Yes
  33. 33. Clarifying: Getting “In” to Empty Nothing goes back into “in” The “in” tray is a processing station, not a storage bin.
  34. 34. 7 basic categories of things to keep track A Projects List A single place to review all projects for needed actions.
  35. 35. Calendared Actions and Information • Actions that must be done on a specific day or time •Put it On Calendar •Triggers for • Activating projects, • Events one might want to participate in • Decision catalysts
  36. 36. Next actions: To-Do List • Record Next and Scheduled actions • Utilize Contexts • Errands • Computer • Online • Home • Calls • May Assign project/Tags • Accessible from anywhere
  37. 37. A “waiting for” list: Waiting for others to complete Actions that are not yours to do, but ones that you still need to know about Needed When you • Delegate an item to someone, • Leave a voicemail or email with a request to get back to me or • Anytime someone makes a promise that they're going to do an action I need to know about. Track All of those balls in all of those other courts.
  38. 38. Someday/Maybe list Eg. • CD’s to buy • Websites to visit • Recipes to cook etc
  39. 39. Review your Daily Calendar & Daily Tickler Folder Review your Action List Reflecting : Keeping it all fresh and functional A few seconds a day is usually all you need for review
  40. 40. Reflecting : Keeping it all fresh and functional Updating Your System : Weekly Review Get Clear Get Current Get Creative
  41. 41. Reflecting : Keeping it all fresh and functional THE BIGGER PICTURE REVIEWS
  42. 42. Four-Criteria Model for Choosing Action in the Moment Context Time Available Energy Available Priority
  43. 43. 1. CONTEXT You Have Freedom When You Are Easy In Your Harness
  44. 44. 2. TIME AVAILABLE Having A Sense Of Time Is Not A Gift But A Conscious Effort To Use It Effectively
  45. 45. 3. ENERGY AVAILABLE We All Have Times When We Think More Effectively And Times When We Should Not Be Thinking At All
  46. 46. 4. PRIORITY It Is Impossible To Feel Good About Your Choices Unless You Are Clear What Your Work Clearly Is
  47. 47. SIX LEVEL MODEL FOR REVIEWING YOUR OWN WORK Life Long Term Visions One To Two Year Goals Areas Of Focus And Accountability Current Projects Current Actions
  48. 48. LIFE Life Long Term Visions One To Two Year Goals Areas Of Focus And Accountability Current Projects Current Actions Intuiting Your Life Purpose And Principles And How To Maximise Its Expression
  49. 49. LONG TERM VISIONS Life Long Term Visions One To Two Year Goals Areas Of Focus And Accountability Current Projects Current Actions A Three Year Vision For Your Career And Personal Network
  50. 50. ONE TO TWO YEAR GOALS Life Long Term Visions One To Two Year Goals Areas Of Focus And Accountability Current Projects Current Actions One To Two Year Goals In Your Job
  51. 51. AREAS OF FOCUS AND ACCOUNTABILTY Life Long Term Visions One To Two Year Goals Areas Of Focus And Accountability Current Projects Current Actions Level Of Current Job Responsibilitie s And Areas Of Life To Maintain At An Appropriate Standard
  52. 52. CURRENT PROJECTS Life Long Term Visions One To Two Year Goals Areas Of Focus And Accountability Current Projects Current Actions Taking The Inventory Of Your Current Work At All Levels Will Automatically Produce A Greater Focus, Alignment And Sense Of Priority
  53. 53. CURRENT ACTIONS Life Long Term Visions One To Two Year Goals Areas Of Focus And Accountability Current Projects Current Actions Make Sure Your Action Lists Are Complete, Which In Itself Can Be Quite A Task
  54. 54. GETTING PROJECTS UNDER CONTROL Brainstorming Organizing Setting Up Meetings Gathering Information Typical Planning Steps
  55. 55. TOOLS AND STRUCTURES THAT SUPPORT PROJECT THINKING Thinking Tools Paper & pads Essels and Whiteboards Digital Tools Support Structures File Folders or Loose-Leaf Pages Paper & Digital Software Tools
  56. 56. WHAT IS THE MAIN SOURCE OF NEGATIVE FEELINGS? Broken Agreements With Yourself Are One Of The Biggest Source Of Negative Feelings
  57. 57. HOW TO PREVENT BROKEN AGREEMENTS WITH YOURSELF • Don’t make the agreement – Maintaining an objective and complete inventory of your work, regularly reviewed, makes it much easier to say no with integrity • Complete the agreement – Finish the work that needs to be done • Renegotiate the agreement – It is the act of forgiveness that opens up the only possible way to think
  58. 58. WHY BRIGHT PEOPLE PROCRASTINATE THE MOST Their sensitivity and creativity give them the capability to produce in their minds lurid nightmare scenarios about what might be involved in doing the project and all the negative consequences that might occur if it not done perfectly
  59. 59. THE INTELLIGENT DUMBING DOWN No Matter How Big And Tough A Problem May Be, Get Rid Of Confusion By Taking One Little Step Towards Solution. Do Something
  60. 60. VALUE OF A NEXT ACTION DECISION MAKING STANDARD The question, “What is the next action” forces:- • Clarity • Accountability • Productivity • Empowerment
  61. 61. GETTING THINGS DONE AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE Research conducted in the field of Cognitive Science has emerged within several frameworks and categories
  62. 62. 1. POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY • Relevant aspects of positive psychology include happiness, psychological well being, strength, character and virtue • This is relevant to GTD as it is more concerned with meaningful work, mindful living and psychological well being than
  63. 63. 2. VALUE OF AN EXTERNAL MIND • If we use our memory as our organizing system, our mind becomes incompetent because of the demand of intense work • GTD helps in focused attention and mindful thinking at the right time
  64. 64. 3. RELIVING THE COGNITIVE LOAD OF INCOMPLETIONS • Uncompleted task take up room in the mind which limits clarity and focus • GTD helps in giving a trusted plan that ensures forward engagement will happen
  65. 65. 4. FLOW THEORIES You can only put your conscious attention to one thing at a time. If that’s all that has your attention, you are in flow
  66. 66. 5. SELF LEADERSHIP THEORY Providing yourself the right cues, which you will notice at the right time, about the right things
  67. 67. 6. GOAL STRIVING • Goals are a vital part of life • GTD serves to facilitate both personal and professional goals
  68. 68. 7. PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL It consists of four definable aspects • Self efficacy • Optimism • Hope • Relilience
  69. 69. THREE TIRES OF MASTERY Over the years people who adopted the GTD methodology have demonstrated three stages of maturity
  70. 70. 1 Employing the fundamentals of managing workflow
  71. 71. 2 Implementing a more elevated and integrated total life management system
  72. 72. 3 Leveraging skills to create clear space and get things done for an ever-expansive expression and manifestation
  73. 73. THANK YOU

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