Todaiji, a temple complex in the city of
Nara in Nara Prefecture, was built in
the year 743. At that time Buddhism
was at ...
Middle gate to
Great Buddha
Hall
The monastery-
temple Todaiji
was founded
by Emperor
Shomu (r.724-
749) when Nara
was the capital of
Japan
Entrance to Todaiji's main hall
Banners hanging by the roof of the temple gate
Entrance to Todaiji's main hall complex: large incense burner and saisenbako (offering box)
In Japanese, saisen is money offered to the gods or bodhisattvas. Commonly this money is put in a saisen box (saisen-bako)...
Japan was the
eastern end of
the Silk Road.
Incense was
brought
from China over
Korea and
developed over
1,000 years
The monastery-temple Todaiji was the head temple of the network of provincial monasteries throughout Japan
Todaiji's main hall, the Daibutsuden (Big Buddha Hall)
End ornaments
(shibi) of the roof
ridge
A shibi is a
Japanese
ornamental tile
set on both ends
of the ridgepole
that tops ...
A tsukubai is a small basin provided in Japanese Buddhist temples for visitors
to purify themselves by the ritual washing ...
Outside the Daibutsuden at the bottom of the steps, the bronze
Octagonal Lantern, one of the oldest treasures in Todaiji, ...
On the top, the
flaming gem
(cintamani), a
spherical or tear-
shaped object,
shapes sacred to
Buddhism
Believed to repel
evil and fulfill
wishes, the
flaming gem can
be also found on
top of pyramidal
temple roofs, of
sorins, ...
The cintamani atop the lantern, the flaming jewel is a
miraculous treasure (a wish-fulfilling jewel within both
Hindu and ...
Four of the panels display Korean lion-dogs and the other four shows heavenly beings playing musical instruments
Immense in scale
(significantly
larger than the
temple that
stands today),
Todaiji
represented the
culmination of
imperial...
Todaiji's main hall, the Big
Buddha Hall (Daibutsuden) is
one of the world's largest
wooden building, despite the
fact tha...
The current
building was
finished in 1709,
and although
immense—57
metres long and
50 metres wide—
it is actually 30%
smal...
Door’s detail
Daibutsuden Great Buddha Hall
Daibutsuden Great Buddha Hall
Text: Internet
Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu
Nicoleta Leu
Gabriela Balaban
Internet
Copyright: All the images belong to their...
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Nara is located less than one hour from Kyoto and Osaka. Considered by many to be the birthplace of Japanese civilization, it was the country's capital before Kyoto in the 8th century. Due to its past as the first permanent capital, it remains full of historic treasures, including some of Japan's oldest and largest temples, "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara", a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Todaiji, a temple complex in the city of Nara in Nara Prefecture, was built in the year 743. At that time Buddhism was at its height, and served as a state religion. The best-known relic at Todaiji Temple is its Daibutsu, a colossal statue that, with 15 meters in height, is the world's largest gilded bronze Buddha. It is housed in an all-wood building, the Daibutsu-den, 48 meters in height, the largest wooden building in the world.

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Japan56 Nara3

  1. 1. Todaiji, a temple complex in the city of Nara in Nara Prefecture, was built in the year 743. At that time Buddhism was at its height, and served as a state religion. The best-known relic at Todaiji Temple is its Daibutsu, a colossal statue that, with 15 meters in height, is the world's largest gilded bronze Buddha. It is housed in an all-wood building, the Daibutsu-den, 48 meters in height, one od the largest wooden building in the world. Japan's first permanent capital was established in the year 710 at Heijo, the city now known as Nara. As the influence and political ambitions of the city's powerful Buddhist monasteries grew to become a serious threat to the government, the capital was moved to Nagaoka in 784. Nara is located less than one hour from Kyoto and Osaka. Considered by many to be the birthplace of Japanese civilization, it was the country's capital before Kyoto in the 8th century. Due to its past as the first permanent capital, it remains full of historic treasures, including the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara", a UNESCO World Heritage Site
  2. 2. Middle gate to Great Buddha Hall
  3. 3. The monastery- temple Todaiji was founded by Emperor Shomu (r.724- 749) when Nara was the capital of Japan
  4. 4. Entrance to Todaiji's main hall
  5. 5. Banners hanging by the roof of the temple gate
  6. 6. Entrance to Todaiji's main hall complex: large incense burner and saisenbako (offering box)
  7. 7. In Japanese, saisen is money offered to the gods or bodhisattvas. Commonly this money is put in a saisen box (saisen-bako), a common item at Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples in Japan. At some temples, visitors burn incense (osenko) in large incense burners. Purchase a bundle, light them, let them burn for a few seconds and then extinguish the flame by waving your hand rather than by blowing it out. Finally, put the incense into the incense burner and fan some smoke towards yourself as the smoke is believed to have healing power. For example, fan some smoke towards your shoulder if you have an injured shoulder
  8. 8. Japan was the eastern end of the Silk Road. Incense was brought from China over Korea and developed over 1,000 years
  9. 9. The monastery-temple Todaiji was the head temple of the network of provincial monasteries throughout Japan
  10. 10. Todaiji's main hall, the Daibutsuden (Big Buddha Hall)
  11. 11. End ornaments (shibi) of the roof ridge A shibi is a Japanese ornamental tile set on both ends of the ridgepole that tops a shingled roof. The kanji for the word mean "kite" and "tail" respectively. Because it resembles a shoe, it is sometimes also called a kutsugata (meaning "shoe shape“)
  12. 12. A tsukubai is a small basin provided in Japanese Buddhist temples for visitors to purify themselves by the ritual washing of hands and rinsing of the mouth
  13. 13. Outside the Daibutsuden at the bottom of the steps, the bronze Octagonal Lantern, one of the oldest treasures in Todaiji, dates from the original 8th-century temple. The lantern's support post is inscribed with a Buddhist text on the merits of lighting lanterns.
  14. 14. On the top, the flaming gem (cintamani), a spherical or tear- shaped object, shapes sacred to Buddhism
  15. 15. Believed to repel evil and fulfill wishes, the flaming gem can be also found on top of pyramidal temple roofs, of sorins, of stone lanterns or of tall poles
  16. 16. The cintamani atop the lantern, the flaming jewel is a miraculous treasure (a wish-fulfilling jewel within both Hindu and Buddhist traditions, said by some to be the equivalent of the philosopher's stone in Western alchemy), often held by Jizo, the children protector and by the bodhisattvas, Avalokiteshvara, the Kannon of Mercy
  17. 17. Four of the panels display Korean lion-dogs and the other four shows heavenly beings playing musical instruments
  18. 18. Immense in scale (significantly larger than the temple that stands today), Todaiji represented the culmination of imperial Buddhist
  19. 19. Todaiji's main hall, the Big Buddha Hall (Daibutsuden) is one of the world's largest wooden building, despite the fact that the present reconstruction of 1692 is only two thirds of the original temple hall's size. The massive building houses one of Japan's largest bronze statues of Buddha (Daibutsu). The 15 meters tall, seated Buddha represents Vairocana and is flanked by two Bodhisattvas.
  20. 20. The current building was finished in 1709, and although immense—57 metres long and 50 metres wide— it is actually 30% smaller than its predecessor. Until 1998, it was the world's largest wooden building. It has been surpassed by modern structures, such as the Japanese baseball stadium 'Odate Jukai Dome', amongst others
  21. 21. Door’s detail
  22. 22. Daibutsuden Great Buddha Hall
  23. 23. Daibutsuden Great Buddha Hall
  24. 24. Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Nicoleta Leu Gabriela Balaban Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Japanese Instrumental Music 2016

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