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Presentation On HUMAN RELATION APPROACH 56 (1).pptx

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Presentation On HUMAN RELATION APPROACH 56 (1).pptx

  1. 1. SUBMITTED BY:- •SANJANA GUPTA •SHRADDHA SISODIYA •SHRADDHA PATHAK •SHRUTI CHAKRABORTY PresentationOn HumanRelationApproach
  2. 2. TREY research ABOUTHUMANRELATION George Elton Mayo (26 December 1880 – 7 September 1949) was an Australian born psychologist, industrial researcher, and organizational theorist. The human relations approach is also known as New Classical approach. Elton Mayo termed it Clinical approach. It attempts to explain the informal relations among employers and employees are concerned with moral and psychological rather than legal aspects of an organization.
  3. 3. TREY research Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. • Ut fermentum a magna ut eleifend. Integer convallis suscipit ante eu varius. • Morbi a purus dolor. Suspendisse sit amet ipsum finibus justo viverra blandit. • Ut congue quis tortor eget sodales. 3
  4. 4. TREY research IMPORTANCE OF HUMAN RELATION 4 1. Assists with employee recruitment and retention- Strong human relations can help recruit and retain quality employees, deliver their wages and benefits in a streamlined way and support their fair and equitable treatment. These functions can also enable an organization to build a reputation as a good place to work. Human relations initiatives can also ensure that existing employees receive the training required to perform their job functions successfully. This can help ensure that employees feel capable and successful at work. 2. Boosts productivity and revenue- The benefits of positive human relations in the workplace can sometimes provide tangible results as well. For example, when effective human relations improves employee recruitment and retention, it can reduce the costs associated with onboarding new hires. Successful human relations can also support employee morale, which may increase employee engagement and lead to higher productivity rates. Human relations can encourage employees to feel connected to the outcome of their work, which might increase productivity and revenue. 3. Promotes innovation and creativity- Employees who enjoy positive workplace relationships and practice open communication and trust with their teammates may be more willing to take creative risks and innovate. Employers that support creativity and innovation might also attract and retain top talent due to the positive work environment. 4. Teamwork and collaboration- Human relations is a foundational part of collaboration and teamwork in the workplace. When employees have a positive experience working with their colleagues and supervisors, they may choose to work collaboratively more often. Teams that trust each other, respect each other's ideas and communicate effectively may be more effective when collaborating. Strong collaboration can also support the smooth functioning of an organization's daily operations.
  5. 5. TREY research Aim of Human relations The aim of human relations in any organisation revolves around:  To facilitate and promote productivity and development for all people involved in any organisational set-up.  To gain acceptance of all the people we work with and relate to, be they supervisors, equals or juniors.  To make the organisational environment humane, less formal and conducive to freedom of consultation and group productivity. To make voluntary human efficiency possible.
  6. 6. TREY research Manager/Instructor and Human Relations Youth Polytechnic managers and instructors need to employ human relations in the process of accomplishing their interrelated duties and responsibilities. To do these, they need to (i) Set out organisational objectives, explain them and let them be understood by everybody. (ii) Delegate duties to staff and trainees for collective participation in task accomplishment. (iii) Evaluate performance of staff/trainees to determine how set objectives are being achieved. The participants need to be given feedback on their performance. The feedback should be aimed at motivating them to continue working hard towards set objectives. (iv) Establish good working relationship between the management committee, the staff/trainees and other interested bodies that interact with institutions to promote dedication and participation in decision making. .
  7. 7. TREY research Hawthorne Experiment The Hawthorne plant of Western Electric was located in Chicago. It had some 29,000 employees and manufactured telephones and telephone equipment, principally for AT & T. The company had a reputation for advanced personnel policies and had welcomed a research study by the National Research Council into the relationship between work-place lighting and individual efficiency. HUMAN RELAION APPROACH EXPERIMENT’S •The experiments The study began in 1924 by isolating two groups of workers in order to experiment with the impact of various incentives on their productivity. Improvements to levels of lighting produced increases in productivity, but so too did reversion to standard lighting and even below-standard lighting in both groups. The initial assumption therefore was that increased output stemmed from variation alone. Other incentives - including payment incentives and rest pauses - were manipulated at regular intervals, and although output levels varied, the trend was inexorably upwards. Whatever experimentation was applied, output went up. Although it had been fairly conclusively determined that lighting had little or nothing to do with output levels, the Assistant Works Manager (George Pennock) agreed that something peculiar was going on and that experimentation should continue
  8. 8. TREY research Illumination Experiments Illumination experiments were undertaken to find out how varying levels of illumination (amount of light at the workplace, a physical factor) affected the productivity. The hypothesis was that with higher illumination, productivity will increase. In the first series of experiments, a group of workers was chosen and placed in two separate groups. One group was exposed to varying intensities of illumination. Since this group was subjected to experimental changes, it was termed as experimental group. Another group, called as Control group, continued to work under constant intensities ofThe researchers found that as they increased the illumination in the experimental group, both groups increased production. When the intensity of illumination decreased, the production continued to increase in both the groups. The production in the experimental group decreased only when the illumination was decreased to the level of moonlight. The decrease was due to light falling much below the normal level. Thus, it was concluded that illumination did not have any effect on productivity but something else was interfering with the productivity. At that time, it was concluded that human factor was important in determining productivity but which aspect was affecting, it was not sure. Therefore, another phase of experiments was undertaken.
  9. 9. Mass Interviewing Programme: During the course of experiments, about 20,000 interviews were conducted between 1928 and 1930 to determine employees’ attitudes towards company, supervision, insurance plans, promotion and wages. Initially, these interviews were conducted by means of direct questioning such as “do you like your supervisor?” or “is he in your opinion fair or does he have favorites?” etc.: this method has disadvantage of stimulating antagonism or the oversimplified ‘yes’ or ‘no’ responses which could not get to the root of the problem, the method was changed to non- directive interviewing where interviewer was asked to listen to instead of talking, arguing or advising. The interview programme gave valuable insights about the human behaviour in the company. •Some of the major findings of the programme were as follows 1. A complaint is not necessarily an objective recital of facts; it is a symptom of personal disturbance the cause of which may be deep seated. 2. Objects, persons or events are carriers of social meanings. They become related to employee satisfaction or dissatisfaction only as the employee comes to view them from his personal situation. 3. The personal situation of the worker is a configuration, composed of a personal preference involving sentiments, desires and interests of the person and the social reference constituting the person’s social past and his present interpersonal relations. 4. The position or status of worker in the company is a reference from which the worker assigns meaning and value to the events, objects and features of his environment such as hours of work, wages, etc. 5. The social organisation of the company represents a system of values from which the worker derives satisfaction or dissatisfaction according to the perception of his social status and the expected social rewards. 6. The social demands of the worker are influenced by social experience in groups both inside and outside the work plant
  10. 10. TREY research CONCLUSION FOR HUMAN RELATIONAPPROACH The fundamental conclusion of human relations approach is that management must recognize the significance of the human factor towards increasing human efficiency at work; and must take decisions based on human considerations (like needs, values, aspirations, beliefs, attitudes of people) rather than only on physical- technical considerations. Having considered the plus and minus aspects of human relations approach, it could be said this approach is quite valuable. In fact, it paved the way for further consideration of behavioural aspects of managing, by management theorists and thinkers.
  11. 11. TREY research MCQS 1. Employees health & safety measures consist of . A. Fire Protection B. Protective Clothing C. Safety Education D. All of these 2. need refers to the need for acceptance, love & care A. ego & esteem B. social C. safety D. Physiological 3. Employers are motivated by social and physiological needs and by economic incentives. answer choices True False Add a footer 11

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