Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Bayesian Inference for front-tracking problems - 2013 IPDO conference

725 vues

Publié le

This talk demonstrates the capability of particle filters to combine measurements to model simulation in a stochastic framework, in order to formulate some feedback information on the wildfire behavior. This is illustrated based on a reduced-scale controlled grassland fire experiment.

Sampling Importance Re-sampling (SIR) and Auxiliary Sampling Importance Re-sampling (ASIR) filters were built on top of a level-set based front-tracking simulator in order to assimilate the time-evolving positions of the fire front and thereby correct the input environmental parameters of the fire spread model (i.e. vegetation properties, surface wind conditions).

Reference published in October 2014
➞ da Silva, W.B., Rochoux, M.C., Orlande, H., Colaço, M., Fudym, O., El Hafi, M., Cuenot, B., and Ricci, S. (2014) Application of particle filters to regional-scale wildfire spread, High Temperatures-High Pressures, International Journal of Thermophysical Properties Research, 43, 415-440.

Publié dans : Sciences
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Bayesian Inference for front-tracking problems - 2013 IPDO conference

  1. 1. Applications of particle filters in moving frontier problems: Wildfire spread forecasting W. Da Silva, M. Rochoux, H. Orlande, M. Colaço, O. Fudym, M. El Hafi, B. Cuenot & S. Ricci ©  Pauline  Crombe/e  ©  Domingo  Viegas  
  2. 2. 2  INTRODUCTION     Wildfire  modeling  challenges   2     Uncertain)es  in  large-­‐scale  fire  spread  predic)ons  due  to   ➔  large  range  of  length  scales  (pyrolysis  vegetaFon  scales  to  plume  dynamic  scales)   ➔  unknown  boundary  and  iniFal  condiFons   • non-­‐homogeneous  and  poorly  defined  vegetal  fuels   • atmospheric  external  forcing   ➔  difficult  validaFon  (lab-­‐scale  and  field-­‐scale  experiments)   cm   m   km   • Cost-­‐effecFve     • Front-­‐tracking  simulator   • Empirical  model  of  the   fire  front  spread-­‐rate   OperaFonally-­‐oriented   front-­‐tracking  simulator     ©  ANR-­‐IDEA  
  3. 3. 3  INTRODUCTION     Regional-­‐scale  wildfire  spread  modeling   3     ➔  ParameterizaFon  of  the  rate  of  spread  (ROS)  as  a   funcFon  of  the  local  condiFons:   Weather   •  Wind  velocity  and  direcFon   •  Air  temperature  and  humidity   •  Rainfall   Terrain     •  Terrain  slope   Vegetal  fuel   •  Moisture  content   •  Depth  of  the  vegetal  layer   •  Packing  raFo   •  Fuel  parFcles  (density,  size,  …)   Front  topology   ©  Cheney     (CSIRO)   ➔  ISSUE  -­‐  Need  to  quanFfy  and   reduce  uncertainFes  in   • Model  formulaFon   • Input  model  parameters   • External  forcing   R   R(x, y, t) = f(uw, αsl, Mf , δf , βf , Σf ...) FOCUS   ©  ANR-­‐IDEA  
  4. 4. INTRODUCTION     Why  parFcle  filters  for  tracking  wildfire  spread?   4     ➔  In  principle,  parFcle  filters  can  handle  the  non-­‐lineariFes  present  in  a  physical  system              (in  a  more  formal  way  than  the  Kalman  filter  and  its  extensions).   • Time-­‐varying  wind   • Highly  heterogeneous  vegetal  fuel   properFes  that  change  over  Fme   Normalizing  constant   ©  M.  Finney  (2011)   Skewed  fire  size   distribuFon  
  5. 5. 5  OUTLINE   Wildfire  spread  forecasFng  using  parFcle  filters   5     ©  Horus  (SDIS  66)   ①   Regional-­‐scale  wildfire  spread  simulaFon  capability   ②   ParFcle  filter  algorithms   ③   ApplicaFon  to  a  controlled  burning  experiment  
  6. 6. Focus:  surface  fire  spread   ➔  Build  a  simplified  model  that  gives  the  Fme-­‐evoluFon  of   the  flame  front  locaFon   • Front-­‐tracking  strategy   • 2-­‐D  propagaFon  within  the  vegetal  fuel  bed  (li/er)   PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3   InformaFon  at  regional-­‐scales:  model   6     ➔  Level-­‐set-­‐based  front  propagaFon  solver     • 2-­‐D  variable:  reacFon  progress  variable  c   • Flame  front  marker:  isoline  c  =  0.5   ∂c ∂t = R|∇c| FIREFLY:   c  =  1   c  =  0   ➔  Issue:  How  to  accurately   describe  uncertainFes  in   input  parameters  of  the   rate  of  spread  R?  
  7. 7. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3   InformaFon  at  regional-­‐scales:  data   7     ➔  GeolocaFon  of  acFve  fire  areas   • Middle  InfraRed  (MIR)  camera  aboard   • FRP  (Fire  RadiaFve  Power)  measurements   sensiFve  to  acFve  fire  areas   Airborne-­‐based  thermal  infrared  imaging     ➔  Requirements  for  inverse  problems   • High-­‐spaFal  resoluFon  imagery  (<  30  m)   • Short  revisit  period   X (m) Y(m) 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 ©  Ronan  Paugam   (King’s  College)   Assume  iso-­‐  temperature   for  fire  igniFon  (600K)   Temperature  field  [K]   ReconstrucFon  of  fire  front  posiFon   ©  D.  Viegas  
  8. 8. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3   Inverse  problem  strategy   8     Why?      1-­‐  Uncertainty  on  inputs                        Uncertainty  on  outputs                              2-­‐  Find  best  esFmate  of  control  variables  given  available  observaFons   ➔  Which  input  model  parameters              are  criFcal  to  control?   • SensiFvity  analysis  of  Rothermel  spread-­‐rate  model   • IllustraFon  of  the  non-­‐lineariFes  present  in  the   wildfire  spread  model     R(x, y, t) = f(uw, Mf , δf , βf , Σf , ...) Mf [!] ![m/s] 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.06 0.07 0.08 0.09 0.1 R [m/s] Mf [-] Wind-­‐aided  fire   spread  (1  m/s)   Short  grass   Long  grass   Timber  li/er   Control  parameters   Simulated  fronts  Firefly  simulator   ¤  level-­‐set  simulator     ¤   moisture  content  Mf ¤   fuel  parFcle  surface/volume  Σf ¤   wind  speed  uw
  9. 9. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3               Inverse  problem  strategy   9     Why?      1-­‐  Uncertainty  on  inputs                        Uncertainty  on  outputs                              2-­‐  Find  best  esFmate  of  control  variables  given  available  observaFons.   ➔  How  to  compare  simulated  fire  front   posiFons  and  observaFons?   Discrete  Fme-­‐evolving   fire  front  posiFons   Uncertainty   range  for  each   front  posiFon   x   y   Fme   Control  parameters   Simulated  fronts  Firefly  simulator   ¤  level-­‐set  simulator     ¤   moisture  content  Mf ¤   fuel  parFcle  surface/volume  Σf ¤   wind  speed  uw ObservaFons    prior  distribuFon   likelihood  DistribuFons  for  modeling   and  observaFon  errors   ¤  selecFon  of  the  front  at   the  assimilaFon  Fme   xk zk hkObserva)on  model  
  10. 10. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3                 Inverse  problem  strategy   10     Why?      1-­‐  Uncertainty  on  inputs                        Uncertainty  on  outputs                              2-­‐  Find  best  esFmate  of  control  variables  given  available  observaFons.   Control  parameters   Simulated  fronts  Firefly  simulator   ¤  level-­‐set  simulator     ¤   moisture  content  Mf ¤   fuel  parFcle  surface/volume  Σf ¤   wind  speed  uw ObservaFons    prior  distribuFon   Bayesian  filtering   Data-­‐driven  feedback   Simulated  front   Observed  front   (xf , yf )1 (xf , yf )p (xf , yf )j (xo f , yo f )j (xo f , yo f )1 (xo f , yo f )p Posterior   distance   Extended  state  es)ma)on  
  11. 11. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3   Inverse  problem  strategy   11     ➔  Bayesian  filtering  in  2  steps:   • PredicFon  of  the  physical  model   • Update  of  the  control  parameters  based  on  Bayes’  theorem   πposterior(xk) = π(xk|zk) = πprior(xk)π(zk|xk) π(zk) Likelihood     (measurement  model   including  uncertainFes)   Normalizing  constant   πprior(xk) = π(xk|xk−1) ➔  ISSUE:  How  to  describe  the  prior  model?   • Is  represented  as  a  transiFon  probability  density  from  Fme  (k-­‐1)  to  Fme  k   • Includes  a  random  walk  model  for  the  parameter  evoluFon   ➔  SOLUTION:  ParFcle  filters  to  obtain  the  posterior   • Monte-­‐Carlo  technique:  representaFon  of  the  posterior  by   a  set  of  random  samples  (parFcles)  with  associated  weights  
  12. 12. reality       model  predicFon   diagnosis             measurements   analysis   PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3   Inverse  problem  strategy   12     ➔  Bayesian  filtering  in  2  steps:   • PredicFon  of  the  physical  model   • Update  of  the  control  parameters  based  on  Bayes’  theorem   πposterior(xk) = π(xk|zk) = πprior(xk)π(zk|xk) π(zk) Likelihood     (measurement  model   including  uncertainFes)   predicFon   update   predicFon   ➔  SequenFal  esFmaFon   Normalizing  constant  
  13. 13. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3   Inverse  problem  strategy   13     ➔  Sampling  Importance  Resampling  (SIR)  algorithm     1   i   N  parFcles   • Ref.  RisFc  et  al.  (2004),  Beyond  the  Kalman  filter   1)  PredicFon   π(xk|xi k−1) 2)  Likelihood   4)  Resampling   (avoid  parFcles  with   negligible  weight)   3)  Update   π(xk|zk)(xi k, wi k) (xi∗ k , 1/N) • LimitaFon  in  the  parallelizaFon   • Loss  of  diversity  (sample  impoverishment)   ISSUES   wi k = π(zk|xi k)
  14. 14. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3   Inverse  problem  strategy   14     ➔  New  algorithm:  Auxiliary  Sampling  Importance  Resampling  (ASIR)   1   i   N  parFcles   • Ref.  W.  Da  Silva  et  al.,  ApplicaFon  to  one-­‐dimensional  solidificaFon  problem,  COBEM  2011   • Key  idea:  improve  the  prior  informaFon  based  on  some  point  esFmate  μi k  using  an  auxiliary   set  of  parFcles   1)  PredicFon   π(xk|xi k−1) 2)  Likelihood   4)  Resampling   (avoid  parFcles  with   negligible  weight)   3)  Update   π(xk|zk)(xi k, wi k) wi k = π(zk|µi k) wi k−1 wi k = π(zk|xi k) (xi∗ k , wi∗ k ) • more  realisFc  parFcles   • less  sensiFve  to  outliers  than  SIR   ADDED-­‐VALUES  FOR  ASIR  
  15. 15. 15  PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3       ApplicaFon  to  controlled  burning  experiment   15     Environmental  condi)ons   ➔  Reduced-­‐scale  fire:  4m  x  4m   ➔  Homogeneous  short  grass  vegetaFon   •  Fuel  bed  depth:  8  cm   •  Moisture  content:  22%   ➔  Mean  rate  of  spread:  1-­‐2  cm/s  (max.  5  cm/s)   ➔  ObservaFon:       •  Error  due  to  the  resoluFon  of  the  MIR  camera   •  Error  esFmaFon:  5  cm  (1%  burning  area)     2min14s   3min10s  2min42s  1min28s   1min46s   !          Mean  wind     1  m/s,  307°     Time  series  of  surface  temperature  field  (Ronan  Paugam,  King’s  College  of  London)   Time  
  16. 16. 16  PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3       ApplicaFon  to  controlled  burning  experiment   16     3  control  parameters   ➔  Wind  magnitude  (fluctuaFons  between  0-­‐2  m/s)   ➔  Fuel  moisture  content  (22%)   ➔  Fuel  parFcle  surface/volume  (11500  m-­‐1)     2min14s   3min10s  2min42s  1min28s   1min46s   !          Mean  wind     1  m/s,  307°     Time  series  of  surface  temperature  field  (Ronan  Paugam,  King’s  College  of  London)   Time   R(x, y, t) = f(uw, Mf , δf , βf , Σf , ...)
  17. 17. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3       ApplicaFon  to  controlled  burning  experiment   17     ➔  Sequen)al  es)ma)on:  5  successive  esFmaFons  of  the  control  parameters   SIR  algorithm  (N  =  200)   ASIR  algorithm  (N  =  50)   Results:   •  Consistent  results  of  the  SIR  and  ASIR  algorithms   •  Good  tracking  of  the  observed  fire  front.  
  18. 18. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3       ApplicaFon  to  controlled  burning  experiment   18     ➔  Sequen)al  es)ma)on:  5  successive  esFmaFons  of  the  control  parameters   SIR  algorithm  (N  =  200)   ASIR  algorithm  (N  =  50)   Moisture   content   Fuel  parFcle   surface/ volume   99%  Confidence  interval   Mean  value   EKF  result  
  19. 19. PART.  1          PART.  2        PART.  3       ApplicaFon  to  controlled  burning  experiment   19     ➔  Sequen)al  es)ma)on:  5  successive  esFmaFons  of  the  control  parameters   Wind   magnitude   (m/s)   SIR  algorithm  (N  =  200)   ASIR  algorithm  (N  =  50)   Results:   •  Same  level  accuracy  reached  by  the  SIR  and  ASIR  algorithms   •  ValidaFon  against  independent  measurements  of  the  wind  velocity  magnitude,  even   though  the  wind  is  subject  to  significant  fluctuaFons   In-­‐situ   measurements  of   the  wind  magnitude   In-­‐situ   measurements  of   the  wind  magnitude  
  20. 20. CONCLUSIONS   ApplicaFons  of  parFcle  filters  to  moving  fronFer  problems       •   SIR  and  ASIR  par)cle  filters  able  to     ➔  achieve  mulF-­‐parameter  esFmaFon     ➔  reduce  fire  modeling  uncertainFes   ➔  track  fire  front  for  a  controlled  burning  experiment     •   Valida)on  of  the  ASIR  algorithm:  shown  to  be  less   computaFonally  expensive  than  the  SIR  algorithm  in  a  wide   range  of  experiments   [W.  Da  Silva  et  al.,  ApplicaFon  to  one-­‐dimensional  solidificaFon   problem,  COBEM  2011]  
  21. 21.     •   Comparison  to  Ensemble  Kalman  filter  algorithm  (CERFACS-­‐University  of   Maryland,  M.  Rochoux’s  PhD  thesis)     •     Applica)ons  of  ASIR  par)cle  filters  to  new  fields  of  applica)ons  (Wellington)   ➔  temperature  field  predicFon  of  a  mulF-­‐layer  composite  pipeline   ➔  reservoir  history  matching  problem   PERSPECTIVES   ApplicaFons  of  parFcle  filters  to  moving  fronFer  problems   Parameter  esFmaFon   • CorrecFon  on  the  model  physics  (dynamic  learning)     • Surrogate  model  of  the  fire  spread  simulator  to   limit  computaFonal  cost        [Rochoux  et  al.  (2012),  CTR  Summer  Program]   Polynomial  Chaos  
  22. 22. Thank  you  for  your  a/enFon!      
  23. 23. Acknowledgments       •   FAPERJ,  CAPES  and  CNPq,  Brazilian  agencies  and  French  Ministry  of  foreign  affairs.   •   Centre  NaFonal  pour  la  Recherche  ScienFfique  (CNRS).   •   Project  «11STIC06-­‐I3PE-­‐Inverse  Problems  in  Physical  Property  EsFmaFon».   •   Project  «IDEA  ANR-­‐09-­‐COSI-­‐006-­‐06,  Wilfires:  From  PropagaFon  to  Atmospheric   Emissions»   •   Dept.  of  Geography,  King’s  College  of  London  (MarFn  Wooster  and  Ronan  Paugam   for  the  data  of  the  controlled  burning  experiment).    

×