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Time Management Presentation

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Time Management Presentation

  1. 1. Time Management
  2. 2. What is Time Management (TM)  Time management refers to managing time effectively so the right time is allocated to the right activity.
  3. 3. Why Effective Time Management Matters?  Success in work, and life in general, depends on one’s ability to efficiently manage time.  There are only 168 hours per week, but so many different ways to spend it! * Some ways clearly help achieve your goals. * Others might seem productive but won’t help you in the long run.  Your own priorities (goals) determine whether your use of time is efficient or inefficient.
  4. 4. Effective VS Efficient
  5. 5. Why do we need TM?  To save time.  To reduce stress.  To function effectively.  To increase our work output.  To have more control over our job. responsibility .
  6. 6. The process of Time Management starts with-  Costing your time  Making Activity logs  Planning  Prioritizing  Scheduling  Goal setting
  7. 7. How to use time effectively?  Effective Planning  Setting goals and objectives.  Setting deadlines.  Delegation of responsibilities.  Prioritizing activities as per their importance.  Spending the right time on the right activity.
  8. 8. Costing your time  Understand your true value by calculating your cost per year cost per year = (salary+taxes+office space+office equipment+profit you generate)  Calculate your hourly rate = cost per year / work hrs per year ….know where you stand.
  9. 9. Making Activity logs Help in  Making a realistic estimate of the time spent during the day.  Pinpoints the critical areas- time spent on low value jobs.  Finding the high yielding times of our day.
  10. 10. Planning  Draw an Action Plan- A list of things that need to be done to achieve your Goal.
  11. 11. Prioritizing  Make a To-Do list  Consider the value of the task before deciding to do it-. Is it worth spending your time & your company resources.  Prioritize your task- The most important jobs should be completed first followed by other jobs.
  12. 12. Scheduling  Make a realistic estimate of how much you can do.  Plan to make the best use of the available time.  Preserve some contingency time to deal with ‘unexpected jobs’.  Minimize stress by avoiding over- commitment to yourself & others.
  13. 13. EISENHOWER matrix
  14. 14. Goal setting ( 1-2 )  For Achieving a goal be your own judge and your own motivator, make Time Management your tool for success.  Effective goals share a number of characteristics in common. Effective goals are: • Specific : When a goal is too vague, you may never know how to reach it or even when you have reached it. Make sure that you know exactly what you hope to achieve. • Measurable : When you have a goal that is measurable, you will know how far you have to go to reach the goal, and when you get there.
  15. 15. Goal setting ( 2-2 ) • Achievable : It is commendable to set your sights high, but sometimes we try to accomplish more than we can actually do. Training and certifying ten Certified Guiding Lions in your district in one year may or may not be achievable at this time for a number of reasons. Your goals should be such that, if you “extend yourself” you can just reach them. • Realistic : Can you establish a program in your district to help everyone with vision problems? It is certainly a worthwhile goal, but it may not be realistic at this time. It might be better to work on setting up a program with schools to provide vision testing and eyeglasses for disadvantaged children. • Time-based : Most of the goals that you establish in your position as a Lions leader will not be long-term. It is important to set time guidelines for your goals, so that you can keep track of your progress as you are going along and can be alert to when you are falling behind schedule.
  16. 16. Academic Success Plan
  17. 17. The 80/20 Rule  The value of the Pareto Principle for a manager is that it reminds you to focus on the 20 percent that matters. Of the things you do during your day, only 20 percent really matter. Those 20 percent produce 80 percent of your results. Identify and focus on those things. When the fire drills of the day begin to sap your time, remind yourself of the 20 percent you need to focus on. If something in the schedule has to slip, if something isn't going to get done, make sure it's not part of that 20 percent.  Critical few and the trivial many.  Good judgment comes form experience.  Experience comes from bad judgment.  Focus on activity that produce the best outcomes for you, professionally and personally.
  18. 18. Learn when to say “NO”  You can’t do everything  Don’t undertake things you can’t complete.  Remain consistent to your goals When you learn to say “NO” you are not closing the door on your responsibilities, but rather you are making sure that you can meet your commitments and accomplish the maximum possible in the time available to you. To be able to say “NO” you will have to accept these three principles: 1.I realize that I can’t do everything 2.I won’t agree to undertake a task or project that I know I will not be able to complete in the timeframe required 3.I will not make commitments that are not consistent with the goals and objectives I have set for myself If you keep these principles in mind, you will find it easier to justify (and explain) why some requests must be turned down. You will also find that you are better able to accomplish the things that you have prioritized as “must do.”
  19. 19. PROCRASTINATION IS THE THIEF OF TIME __Edward young
  20. 20. The Big Rock’s of Life One day an expert in time management was speaking to a group of business students and, to make a point, he used this illustration. As he stood in front of the group he pulled out a large wide-mouthed Mason jar and set it on the table in front of him. Then he produced about a dozen rocks and placed them, one at a time, into the jar. When the jar was filled to the top and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, "Is this jar full?" Everyone in the class said, "Yes." Then he said, "Really?" He reached under the table and pulled out a bucket of gravel. He dumped some gravel in and shook the jar causing pieces of gravel to work themselves down into the space between the rocks. Then he asked the group once more, "Is the jar full?" By this time the class began to understand. "Probably not," one of them answered. "Good!" he replied. He reached under the table and brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in the jar and it went into all of the spaces left between the rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the question, "Is this jar full?" No!" the class shouted. Once again he said, "Good." Then he grabbed a pitcher of water and began to pour it in until the jar was filled to the brim. Then he looked at the class and asked, "What is the point of this illustration?“ One student raised his hand and said, “No matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard you can always fit some more things in it!" "No," the speaker replied, "that's not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is: If you don't put the big rocks in first, you'll never get them in at all." What are the 'big rocks' in your life? Your children; Your loved ones; Your education; Your dreams; A worthy cause; Teaching or mentoring others; Doing things that you love; Time for yourself; Your health; Your mate (or significant other). Remember to put these BIG ROCKS in first or you'll never get them in at all. If you sweat about the little stuff (the gravel, sand, and water) then you'll fill your life with little things you worry about that don't really matter, and you'll never have the time you need to spend on the big, important stuff (the big rocks). So, tonight, or in the morning, when you are reflecting on this short story, ask yourself this

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