Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Prochain SlideShare
Smart grid and micro grid
Smart grid and micro grid
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 25 Publicité
Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Similaire à Rizwana (20)

Publicité

Plus récents (20)

Rizwana

  1. 1. Seminar Presentation On Under the guidance of Presented by (Mr. G. Venkateswarlu M. Tech, PhD) Ms. Sk. Rizwana 17711D0713 Narayana Engineering college Nellore
  2. 2. Contents  Introduction  What is smart grid  Vision  Comparison  Smart Grid Technologies  Smart grid in various countries  Smart grid scenario in INDIA  Advantages  Disadvantages  Conclusion
  3. 3. What is Smart Grid??  A smart grid delivers electricity from suppliers to consumers using two-way digital technology to control appliances at consumers homes to save energy, reduce cost and improve the reliability and transparency.  It is a grid which increases the robustness, efficiency and flexibility of the power system.  It is also sometimes called a “self healing grid”.
  4. 4. Smart Grid is  Intelligent  Accommodating  Efficient  Quality-focused  Motivating  Opportunistic  Resilient  Green
  5. 5. Smart Grid Vision for INDIA “Transform the Indian power sector into a secure, adaptive, sustainable and digitally enabled ecosystem that provides reliable and quality energy for all with active participation of stakeholders”
  6. 6. Comparison Main grid Smart grid Analogue/electromechanical Digital/microprocessor controlled Reactive(prone to failures and blackouts) Proactive  One pricing  Real time pricing One-way communication (if any) Two-way/integrated communication Few sensors Many monitors and sensors Manual restoration Condition -performance-based maintenance Limited control over power flows Pervasive control systems Estimated reliability Predictive reliability
  7. 7. Smart Grid Technologies Advanced metering infrastructure(AMI):  AMI refers to systems that measure, read and analyse energy consumption.  AMI makes two-way communications with customers possible and is the backbone of smart grid.  The objectives of AMI is to provide error free data, network problem identification, load profiling, energy audit and partial load curtailment in place of load shedding. Technological components of AMI include:  Smart Meters  Communication Network  Meter Data Acquisition System  Meter Data Management System (MDMS)
  8. 8. Demand Response:  Demand response involves allowing customers to choose non-essential loads, which can be shed by the customers themselves or by the utility, at peak times.  It is an agreement between the Utilities with the consumer with specific conditions of load, price and time intervals.  It helps utilities reduce overall installation costs, operating costs and mitigate potential grid failures. Demand Response Technologies:  End-User Interfaces  Load Control Devices  AMI
  9. 9. Demand response AMI
  10. 10. Distributed Generation: Decentralized Generation - Distributed Generation and Micro Grid  When energy is generated and distributed to its end users, it is termed as Decentralized Generation.  Onsite power generation has many benefits over the centralized power generation systems, as it eliminates the costs associated with the transmission and distribution of power over long distances.  These small scale technologies can yield power from 1KW to as much as 100MW.
  11. 11. Technologies for Distributed Generation:  Reciprocating Engines  Microturbines  Wind Turbines  Combustion Gas Turbines  Fuel Cells  Photovoltaics (PV)
  12. 12. Home Area Network:  A home area network connecting devices in the home such as displays, load control devices and ultimately "smart appliances" seamlessly into the overall smart metering system.  The Home Area Market is used to serve home with digital application solutions and energy management.  The installed base of smart home networks globally is expected to increase from 1.5 million homes in 2009 to 14.7 million in 2014. Home Network Technologies :  Smart Homes
  13. 13. Communication:  A change in current electrical grid will be the addition of intelligent electronic devices (IEDs)which provide bi- directional communications.  The multifunction electronic meters, intelligent relays and control units will then be able to exchange information with a provider's central control systems. Communications technologies:  Landlines  Wireless  Private radio  A Power Line Carrier between substations and the new technology of broadband-over-power line at the distribution segments.
  14. 14. Smart Grid Cyber Security:  This serves to monitor grid conditions, energy consumption and generation as well as automate many of its operations.  The smart grid will employ smart devices and instruments on both the customer and utility side.  Some of these technologies include the use of smart meters , microprocessor enabled electric meters to communicate to utilities and customers on energy being used, grid conditions and electricity prices in real time to the consumer.
  15. 15. Electric Vehicles:  Electric engines produce no carbon emissions and the energy they consume is increasingly being produced from renewable energy sources.  Electric engines are also more efficient than ICEs and can help to decrease energy usage.  These battery powered vehicles can be used to supply energy to the grid from their batteries during peak use periods during the day while charging mostly at night, when there is unused generating capacity.
  16. 16. Electrical Energy Storage (EES):  Till about a few years ago, we thought that electricity cannot be stored and needs to be consumed as and when it is generated.  Times are changing; today electricity can be stored in megawatt scale.  These electricity energy storage (EES) applications are increasingly becoming viable around the world.  The smart grids are expected to be the biggest achievement of the 21st century! And energy storage technologies are going to be an important part of it.
  17. 17. EES Technologies: They are broadly classified into mechanical, electrochemical, chemical, electrical and thermal energy storage systems:
  18. 18. Smart Grid in various countries  In 2010, China is the worldwide leader, having designated $7.32 billion for smart grid investment, based on data from Zpryme Research & Consulting, an Austin, Texas, research and consulting firm that draws on stated federal spending figures.  The United States was second at $7.09 billion;  Japan was a distant third at $849 million and South Korea was fourth at $824 million.  The first European nation was Spain, which finished fifth at $807 million.
  19. 19. Smart Grid scenario in INDIA • By 2050, around 92% of electricity power generation would be by renewable energy fired power station, where wind, PV and solar thermal would contribute 71% of electricity generation. • The installed capacity would rise from 52 % in 2030 to 94% in 2050 by 1149 GW. • Whilst India’s emissions of CO2 will decrease from 1,704 million tons in 2009 to 426 million tons in 2050. • Annual per capita emissions will fall from 1.4 tons to 1 ton in 2030 and 0.3 tons in 2050 • The fuel cost savings in the Energy Revolution scenario reach a total of $ 5,500 billion up to 2050, or $ 138 billion per year.
  20. 20. Advantages of smart grid  Better power quality.  Renewables integration.  It reduces electricity theft.  It reduces electricity losses.  It reduces equipment failures due to automatic operation based on varying load conditions.  It reduces air emissions of CO2, SOx, Nox.
  21. 21. Disadvantages of smart grid  During emergency situation, network congestion or performance are big challenges in smart grid system.  Cellular network providers do not provide guaranteed service in abnormal situations such as wind storm, heavy rain and lightening conditions.  Some smart meters can be hacked which can be used to increase or decrease the demand for power.  It is expensive to install smart meter compare to traditional old electricity.
  22. 22. Conclusion  By using smart grid technology energy can be utilized to the maximum and would not be wasted.  This technology also helps to save earth from the global warming.  It refers to the modernized version of the earlier traditional method of energy supply. THINK ‘SMART’!!!

×