Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

BIM Uses In Design

13 219 vues

Publié le

Publié dans : Formation, Technologie
  • Tired of being scammed? Take advantage of a program that, actually makes you money!  https://tinyurl.com/y4urott2
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • hello sir. I would love to have your copy of slides on my email for reference purposes for my dissertation and I hope you don't mind. Thank you, leoz_tjay@yahoo.com
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • hey there ,i found your research very useful and pretty intresting as i am even doing the same kind of research, if its possible can i have a copy of the slides on my email,i will be thankful to you.
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • hi, i’m interest with your research topic. May you give me contract email at this email address: meiying.tan@yahoo.com. Thank you.
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • great!
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici

BIM Uses In Design

  1. 1. Building Information Modeling Uses in Design Project Execution Planning for Building Information Modeling Nevena Zikic Master of Science Thesis  CIC Research Program AE Dept | Penn State University 1
  2. 2. Introduction to the Research Project Execution Planning for BIM intended for facility owners and project           participants to help them reach decisions on BIM implementation   Four phases of a capital facility project:  Planning Design Construction Operations BIM currently used for targeted tasks but not accepted as a whole due to lack of  planning in general and few disparate guidelines available for team members 2
  3. 3. Goal and Objectives Goal: Create structure for BIM uses in design based on expert interviews after  completing detailed content analysis of available literature on BIM and its uses Research objectives:  Determine the current status of BIM in design Identify the trends in design firms Document the most important success and failure factors  Identification of BIM  uses in design Develop BIM uses in design Disseminate the results through the BIM Ex Guide 3
  4. 4. Scope Definition and Limitations Scope: “Design Facility comprises all the functions  required to define and communicate the  owner’s needs to the builder. These  activities translate the program and  executions plan into bid and construction  documents and operations and  maintenance documents that allow the  facility to meet the owner’s needs”  (Sanvido, 1995: IBPM) Limitation: US firms with Mid‐Atlantic  focus 4
  5. 5. Literature Review: Topics BIM in Design State of the Industry Design Services Design Coordination Process Integrated Project Delivery BIM Benefits and Challenges BIM Design Productivity Benefits New and Changed Staffing within Design Firms BIM Contractual Terms 5
  6. 6. Literature Review: BIM in Design BIM as a paradigm change has the potential to modernize the AEC industry “Strength in the possibility to communicate easily and in a more appropriate  format the design intent and complex construction information to the project  team” (Eastman et al., 2007) Construction industry the only one that does not use the full benefits of virtual  modeling prior to construction to reduce flaws as opposed to automobile, aircraft,  spacecraft and shipbuilding industry  Source: http://www.zimdaily.com/images/Beijing.jpg      http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/id7453_2.jpg 6
  7. 7. Literature Review: State of the Industry Estimated efficiency losses in the US capital facilities industry approximately $15.8  billion per year (2002 data) due to inadequate interoperability (NIST’s study “Cost  Analysis of Inadequate Interoperability in the US Capital Facilities Industry”) State of the Industry: FMI/CMAA Eight Annual Survey of Owners               Rate benefits that BIM solutions provide/Rate hurdles that slow or prevent  adoption of BIM solutions • 1. Improved communication and collaboration BIM Benefits • 2. Higher quality project execution/decision‐making • 3. Greater assurance of project archival • 1. Lack of expertise BIM Hurdles • 2. Greater system complexity • 3. Lack of industry standards State of the Industry:                                                                                       • Monthly AIA Work‐on‐the‐Boards                                                                             Benefit: Enhanced  Concern/risk: A higher  survey panel of firm leaders (2007):   project quality through  percent of project costs  fewer change orders and  are incurred earlier,  more accurate  changing the traditional  documents phase client billing 7
  8. 8. Literature Review: Conclusion Few sources provide specific data on implementation of BIM in design practice  Currently some guidelines available to lead the project team members in how to  develop an executive plan for BIM: Autodesk Communication Specs, AGC  Consensus Docs, AIA E202 Model Program Specs Intention to identify, define and create structure for BIM uses in design that would  assist in preparing customized project execution plan for BIM 8
  9. 9. Research Steps 1. Literature Review: clarify the definition of BIM along with identifying various  topics on BIM, its current status, challenges and success factors Review performed from the industry aspect  Published research: journal papers, BIM guides and various expert articles  2. Semi‐structured Interviews: Interview questions identified after the review of  the available literature and brainstorming sessions with the CIC team members Modified and pre‐tested in two pilot interviews with industry members Interviews with 18 design professionals and engineers, industry experts and  BIM champions: data analyzed, summarized and the conclusions drawn Goal is not to get representative or typical responses, but the data have a  certain structure Interviewees free to talk about the subject but their talk guided Eliminate bias: reliability and validity Rationale: operating in discovery, rather than verification mode (Guba and  Lincoln, 1981) 9
  10. 10. Research Steps Cont. 3. Content Analysis: data analysis of BIM expert interviews in design done using  mapping to organize the information More quantifiable data averaged and organized based upon frequencies  Interview data collected in the following categories: I. Background Information II. BIM Execution Planning III. Uses of BIM IV. BIM Impact Analysis V. Case Study VI. Concluding Questions 4.  BIM Uses in Design: creating structure and developing BIM uses in design in  more detail . . . . Literature  Expert  Content  BIM Uses  Review Interviews Analysis in Design 10
  11. 11. Interview Questions Mind Map 11
  12. 12. Sample Interview Content Analysis 12
  13. 13. Background Information: Title/Position Title/position of the interviewed industry experts: Applications  Architectural  Design  Manager/ Intern/Associate  Manager/Digital  Architect Design Coordinator Administrator (2) Project  Senior Analyst/ Eng/Manager/ Principal (8) Senior VP Designer Technical/Design/ VDC Engineer Research Director (2) 13
  14. 14. Background Information: Company Size Number of employees in the interviewees’ companies or design offices: Small size company/design office 1‐30 employees: 22% or 4 out of 18 Medium size company/design office 31‐150 employees: 28% or 5 out of 18 Large size company/design office 150+employees: 50% or 9 out of 18 22% Small size 1‐30 Medium size 31‐150 50% Large size 150+ 28% 14
  15. 15. Background Information: Personal Experience Interviewees’ years of experience with BIM: Beginner level (less than 1 year of experience): 28% or 5 out of 18  Intermediate level (1 to 5 years of experience): 33% or 6 out of 18 Advanced level (more than 5 years of experience): 39% or 7 out of 18 Beginner level < 1 year 28% 39% Intermediate level 1‐5 years Advanced level > 5 years 33% 15
  16. 16. Background Information: Company Experience Company/Design office’s years of experience with BIM: Beginner level (less than 1 year of experience): 11% or 2 out of 18  Intermediate level (1 to 5 years of experience): 50% or 9 out of 18 Advanced level (more than 5 years of experience): 39% or 7 out of 18 11% Beginner level < 1 year 39% Intermediate level 1‐5 years Advanced level > 5 years 50% 16
  17. 17. BIM Execution Plan: Developed or Not? BIM Execution Plan developed or not? 1/3 of the respondents did not have a specific plan 2/3 had some form of plan usually informal Only one design office had an extensive implementation plan No Plan Some Form of Plan Extensive Plan The need for existence of such plan and establishment of standards and guidelines! 17
  18. 18. BIM Execution Plan: Participants Who was involved in the creation of the BIM Execution Plan?  Corporate BIM  manager Steering/executive  committee BIM  champion/team  captain Senior firm leaders  (partners,  BIM  principals) coordinator/Model  master Management  Project  team/key technical  manager/architect staff Design team  members 18
  19. 19. BIM Execution Plan: Decisions What are some of the decisions made in the creation of BIM Ex Plan? Commit!: The absolute first decision • Everyone adaptive and come together as a team Open to considering other ways of doing business • BIM as a tool not the end result or the goal Bring the level of understanding throughout the firm • BIM savvy people build synergy; cohesive understanding and acceptance of BIM Create new position/job descriptions • Explore new options, move forward, etc Early involvement of the constructor  • Collocation of the design and construction team Develop BIM standards • Standards are the key; create manual how to do BIM along with templates  Execution of the model set up 19 • One or multiple, model uses, shared with client or used internally, team size
  20. 20. BIM Execution Plan: Decisions Cont. Division of work • Decide on performance spec items, level of detail, access to the model, legal Record everything • How to do work/train, how much detail, etc Learn to work in multiple platforms  • Agree on version, software, level of detail, etc Start with humble initial aspirations • Good set of coordinated drawings, simpler project Market and present BIM outside of the office • Spread the message to consultants and owners Explore new capabilities • Prefabrication, advanced energy modeling, new workflows, different alliances Set goals  20 • Levels of implementation and number of years to accomplish these goals 
  21. 21. BIM Execution Plan: Process What was the process used to develop a BIM Ex plan? • Leverage core competencies and broaden market appeal 1 • Align technology with business goals and core competencies 2 • Change of mindset is essential: from cost based to value based  business propositions 3 • Develop plan for how to train the company and set goals 4 • Execute fast tracked pilot project and compare to the traditional  approach 5 • Prepare for trial and error since no BIM standards exist yet 6 21
  22. 22. BIM Execution Plan: Process Cont. • Hire software representative or 3rd party consultant to assist  7 • Set up a plan with software vendors on how to start a project in BIM 8 • Develop process diagrams and distribute to the whole team 9 • Consider outsourcing the information that goes into these models 10 • Consider expanding services with analytical applications  11 • Enable design build or integrated project delivery 12 22
  23. 23. BIM Uses in Design: Categories BIM uses in design can be classified in these 4 categories: Design  System Analysis Communication Estimating Scheduling  23
  24. 24. BIM Uses in Design The following BIM uses in design were identified during the expert interviews: BIM Uses in Design Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 24
  25. 25. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication BIM Uses in Design Arch Design  • Visualize the project and help understand  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) the design Authoring Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 25
  26. 26. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication BIM Uses in Design • Design discovery/definition: critical decisions made Programming Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating • Blocking/stacking: tremendous labor saving device  Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) • Help get funding and communicate designer’s vision Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 26
  27. 27. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication Existing  BIM Uses in Design • 3D laser scanning: far less expensive and  more efficient Conditions  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) • Historic preservation: complex interiors and  Emergency  Modeling lots of detail Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 27
  28. 28. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication • Orientation studies, topography,  BIM Uses in Design Site Analysis/ existent/future underground utilities,  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating calculations, etc Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) Selection • Environmental/civil engineering or  Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning outsourced to consultants 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 28
  29. 29. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication BIM Uses in Design • BIM used mostly for arch design authoring  Design  and design reviews Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) Reviews • Early in design: effective value engineering,  Emergency  fewer questions and less miscommunication Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 29
  30. 30. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication BIM Uses in Design • Frequent BIM use: precise, fast and visual  review Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Constructability Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) • Easier to communicate construction details  Emergency  in 3D Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 30
  31. 31. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication • Most frequent BIM use: up to designer/consultants to  BIM Uses in Design resolve coordination issues 3D Design  Analysis/Selection • Increased communicability with consultants: potential  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) to illuminate a lot of errors Coordination Emergency  • Biggest bonus: error checking, conflict avoidance and  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning resolution 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 31
  32. 32. BIM Uses in Design: Design Communication • Complicated projects: construction details or  BIM Uses in Design Virtual Mock‐ certain chosen spaces Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating • Review and testing spaces by their future end  Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) ups users and clients: healthcare facilities/courtrooms Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis • Marketing aspect in high end projects Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 32
  33. 33. BIM Uses in Design: System Analysis • Egress/circulation paths, fire rated walls, ADA  Emergency  BIM Uses in Design requirements, turning radiuses, etc Security  Analysis/Selection • International Code Council project Smart Codes Evacuation  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Code Validation Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) Validation • Codes very open to local interpretation Emergency  Planning • Code officials unable to use electronic data for code  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning review yet 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 33
  34. 34. BIM Uses in Design: System Analysis BIM Uses in Design Engineering  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) Analyses Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 34
  35. 35. BIM Uses in Design: System Analysis BIM Uses in Design • BIM used for drawing and avoiding conflicts Structural  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection • Using external applications to create  Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) Analysis analytical models Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 35
  36. 36. BIM Uses in Design: System Analysis BIM Uses in Design • Effective for value engineering: abundance  of energy modeling and analysis software Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Energy Analysis Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) • Help fine tune the design: site analysis and  Emergency  sustainability efforts Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 36
  37. 37. BIM Uses in Design: System Analysis BIM Uses in Design • Part of sustainability evaluation: tools very  Lighting  rudimentary Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) Analysis • Hopefully lighting/sustainability analyses  Emergency  soon integrated in one rich database  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 37
  38. 38. BIM Uses in Design: System Analysis BIM Uses in Design • Not as developed since tools lagging behind Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  HVAC Analysis Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection • Time for more integrated design solutions  Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) to emerge Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 38
  39. 39. BIM Uses in Design: System Analysis BIM Uses in Design Sustainability  • No full BIM capabilities yet: energy and  lighting analysis complement LEED  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  (LEED)  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) • Software disconnected from the rating  Evaluation Emergency  system: USGBC working with Autodesk  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 39
  40. 40. BIM Uses in Design: Estimating • Designers not asked to provide the service  BIM Uses in Design yet: back checking suspicious aspects and  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Cost Estimating Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating offer early estimates  Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) • Crucial for model to be 100% accurate:  Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning better if model shared in design build or IPD 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 40
  41. 41. BIM Uses in Design: Scheduling BIM Uses in Design Phase Planning  • Tenant fit‐out, renovations, design options,  Arch Design  Existing Conditions  Site  Engineering  Sustainability  Phase Planning (4D  Programming Design Reviews Code Checking Cost Estimating space utilizations, phased projects by cost  Authoring Modeling Analysis/Selection Analysis (LEED) Evaluation Modeling) (4D Modeling) loaded schedules, etc Emergency  Evacuation  Constructability Structural Analysis Planning 3D Design  Security Validation Energy Analysis Coordination Virtual Mock‐ups Lighting Analysis HVAC Analysis 41
  42. 42. 42
  43. 43. BIM Uses in Design: Content/Level of Detail 1. Define the best level of detail and extensive but  limited list of model contents: BIM application ability  to embody tremendous amount of detail  2. Develop BIM standards and best practices for  model manageability: set up the model properly to be  shared; components modeled much simpler 3. Precise BIM modeling and properly dividing up  worksets crucial: everyone has the same information;  avoid manufacturers’ components  4. Decision when to stop with modeling and avoid  getting lost in detail: common sense and rule of  thumb; full BIM models yet rare to find 43
  44. 44. BIM Uses in Design: Content/Level of Detail Cont. 5. Establish model level of detail per project by design  team: mechanical ducts 10” or more, electrical  conduit 2.5” or more, slab penetrations over 6x6”, etc 6. Manufacturers to provide model contents with  product information: library of products with  selections hesitant to share due to liability 7. Build central library with generic content not  manufacturer specific: track specific information at  project level; special group to create content  8. Consider external manufacturers’ database  (Architect’s Design Studio Tool): contains data not  library of objects; take chosen products’ attributes  back to the model 44
  45. 45. BIM Uses in Design: Processes/Applications Most frequent software used: Bentley Triforma and Microstation, Autodesk AutoCAD,  ADT, ABS and Revit, NavisWorks, Archicad, Gehry Technologies, IES, Ecotech, etc Ideally  sharing the  Start with  model in  light BIM and  design build  progress to  Track BIM  or IPD full BIM:  model uses,  lonely vs.  type and  Build  social BIM  quantity of  templates  concept information  to start  included projects  Ideally to  with  cross  customizing  train staff  a standard  on both  BIM file major  BIM  platforms  45
  46. 46. BIM Uses in Design: Team Competencies > Understanding BIM on corporate  and strategic level by management > Imperative for  > Cultural shift of  senior people to  > Good solid BIM  modeling instead  lead the building  training of drafting technology effort > Team  composition and  > Team building  > Teamwork and  level of  from day one synergy of team experience 46
  47. 47. BIM Uses in Design: Top Skills Coordination Knowledge of  Collaboration design tools Top  Knowledge of  design  Communication skills disciplines Problem  Flexibility solving Positive  attitude 47
  48. 48. BIM Uses in Design: Legal/Insurance/Contract What are some of the legal/insurance/contractual considerations? Legal issues considered the most important to address  • Adding BIM contract language to limit liability: BIM model for information only; no case law yet  Contractual language to develop partnerships with people and teams you can trust • First BIM documents published: Consensus DOCs and BIM Addendum Full not partial BIM would lead to revised legal and insurance considerations • Sharing drawings with disclaimer or electronic paralegal agreement or deliver them in read only format If everyone is sharing the benefits, everyone needs to share the risk together • Best environment in design build or IPD contractual relationship; ongoing effort to do IPD and share  profit pool  Insurance addresses BIM in a neutral way • No case work to show BIM project is more or less risky; downstream BIM is seen as less risky leading to  reducing the rates for everyone 48
  49. 49. BIM Impact Analysis: Done or Not? Anecdotal data  Metrics: no  report: • Starts with 35% less  measurable data  • Based on project  productivity available yet data, performances  • After 4‐5 months  • 80% decrease in  and hours tracked back to the same  • Hours to complete  clashes • Mostly profitable as  level the project • Savings in cost for  before if not more • Following projects  • RFI tracking system rework • No RFIs on conflicts  having increase • Conflicts resolved • Time savings or document quality • Compare two similar  • The number or  • RFIs answered in  projects people using BIM Detailed analysis  two weeks rarely done and no  • Percentage of  • Reduced  projects done in BIM metrics yet productivity due to  BIM implementation training 49
  50. 50. BIM Impact Analysis: Cost and Design Fees Cost Up • Hardware/software  • Training staff  • Schematic design phase Cost Down • Unit cost of professional services • Decrease in errors and omissions  • Bids under budget  • Construction and change order cost • Design better communicated Design fees restructured to affect the reality of building the model: 50
  51. 51. BIM Impact Analysis: Time Time negatively affected • Gearing up the company to  execute BIM Time positively affected • Architectural practice and design  in general  • Reduction in overall delivery time  by eliminating conflicts • Overall design schedule: time  savings in CD and CA phase 51
  52. 52. BIM Impact Analysis: Quality Quality negatively affected • Overall project delivery quality still  lacking  • Only quality improved not time or  cost Quality positively affected • Project quality in general goes up • Better coordination: issues caught  immediately  • Much less RFIs initiated • No last minute adding of the staff 52
  53. 53. BIM Impact Analysis: Staff Composition Did composition of the design staff change with BIM implementation? Changing technology and practice management: Leadership •Challenge to motivate individuals and lead them through the process •1/3 of respondents said the design staff composition did not change dramatically More technological and less academic background needed for designers Management Change in time having no drafters just designers and also having specialty occupations BIM champions need to be trained first, then work with newbies and applications manager Mentoring Large design offices completely restructured its staff: BIM users, BIM leaders, BIM  coordinator, Digital Design Coordinator, etc Small design offices cut the number of their staff: remaining staff more experienced Incentives Others still same roles, but might have total collapse of the hierarchy with BIM 53
  54. 54. BIM Impact Analysis: New Roles BIM Users BIM  BIM Model  Manager/ Manager in  IT Model Master BIM  Model BIM Leaders  BIM MEP  Corporate/ Manager Local BIM  BIM  Integrator Coordinator 54
  55. 55. BIM Impact Analysis: Critical Success Factors What are some of the critical success factors for BIM implementation? • Organizational change management/motivational challenge for staff: crucial in  changing practice 1.  • Understanding of what BIM is, what to expect from it and how to operate 2.  • Practice/process driven approach important since BIM not just technology 3.  • Full application of BIM leads to full award 4.  • Owner requirements drive BIM implementation 5.  • Upper management must strongly support the BIM implementation  6. 55
  56. 56. BIM Impact Analysis: Critical Success Factors Cont. • Investment of more senior people upfront to have good working model 7.  • Staff needs to be open minded, want change, research and learn BIM 8.  • Quality incremental training, project focused and with continuous commitment 9.  • Best practices /standards: BIM model set up with defined contents/all disciplines 10.  • Capability, flexibility of the team, communication and adopting changes critical 11.  • BIM process seriously pre‐planned: BIM Project Execution Planning 12. 56
  57. 57. BIM Impact Analysis: Issues/Concerns What are some of the issues or concerns rising with BIM implementation? Implementation business model for  Losing control of information major  BIM does not exist yet  fear of designers Address technical issues:  Benefit of BIM worth the cost just  interoperability and data exchange  for new construction? (IFC format and NavisWorks) Design decisions need to be made  Adapt to changes in the software  much faster due to upgrades each year BIM authoring tools make it easy to  Libraries/components still missing  do a bad building or design and need to be more developed Model has to be accurate: no  Poorly trained people and lack of  hidden information or forced  experience of junior people  dimensions 57
  58. 58. BIM Impact Analysis: Risks What are some of the risks incurred in the BIM implementation? Choose a wrong type of project to  start and change practice to BIM Duty risks: Unknown risks: • Knowingly assumed based  • Changed by increasing  Project managers who do not accept  on signed contracts and  knowledge and carefully  the technology yet professional licensure executing BIM Legal protection when sharing the  model not being set in place yet Manufacturer’s product data/objects  incorrect and represent liability IPD carrying a lot of risk that we are  not aware of yet 58
  59. 59. Concluding: Future Industry Trends What are some of the future trends in the BIM implementation? • BIM momentum changing the industry: BIM more prevalent and more of  1.  a norm like green technologies • Organizational structure changing: Arch + AE firms merging into one  2.  enterprise (design build, big conglomerates or developers) • Transition to BIM as consistent trend for owners: BIM tied much more  3. with FM, O&M and into fabrication and supply chain • IPD, teams that work frequently together and have mutual trust in IPD 4. • IPD and design build emerging as clients’ method of delivery preference • Delivering projects in BIM and CDs replaced by the BIM model 5. • 2D drawings might disappear or be second to the model 59
  60. 60. Concluding: Future Industry Trends Cont. • BIM software more interoperable and compatible: IFC format becoming  6.  more robust and universal, leading to database standards • More fabrication expected from digital model: components built off site,  7.  laser cut and assembled in controlled environment and brought to site • Increase in staff specialization: people highly skilled in certain areas and  8. workforce expected to be versed in many different BIM software • Academia investing time and resources in BIM education: creating new  9. curriculum for BIM and VDC and introducing leadership programs • Virtual collaboration and communication with people, clients and  10. disciplines around the globe: BIM Storm 60
  61. 61. Acknowledgments: Participants Design  Burt Hill Cagley DMJM Byline Fox  Gensler HDR Jacobs Architects Kling  Lessard  O’Neil and  Leo A Daly Stubbins Group Manion Rast  ONYX OPP RTKL Studio Smith  VOA Group 61
  62. 62. Building Information Modeling Uses in Design Project Execution Planning for Building Information Modeling A buildingSMART Alliance project sponsored by: The Charles Pankow Foundation Construction Industry Institute (CII) Clark Construction Penn State Office of Physical Plant (OPP) PACE 62

×