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Methods for a good presentation

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Presentation skills final
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Methods for a good presentation

  1. 1. Riphah International Univertity Riphah College of Veterinary Sciences Lahore Presanted by: Dr. Nabeel Yousaf Annual confrance on Comunication Skils
  2. 2. Presantation Deffination A speech or talk in w hich a new product, idea, or piece of w ork is show n and explained to anaudience.(Oxford) Mean to give information about anythink to prove its qualities. A presantation includes follow ingtypes and parts. 1-Oral presantation This teachnique of presantation is very common in most of the institutins, saminars and conf rances. It is most convaniant w ay to convey your message and for audience as w ell. It is most popular and most preforable method . 2-Written presantation It is a w ay that is used in most of the Books, New spapers, Reserch papers and Magazines etc. It takes more time than oral presantation to convey your message.It is the second largest method used . 3-Gastural presantation This is the most hidden type of presantation used by special peoles and difficult to understand for a common man. This method is used by famous comedian Mr. Bean. 4-Demonstrative presantation
  3. 3. In this metthod both oral and prectical to make students and audience clear about any practical work.For example a explanation of any lab practical. Introduction Introduction is the most importat and first part of a presantation.It includes the basic idea and components of presantation.It should take 10-15% of your presanntation.The language should be according to the audience that you have and and your gasture also should be according to the culture of area. Its primary purpose is to capture the attention of the audience, usually within the first 15 seconds. There are following sentanses to get the attantion of audience. 1-Ask a question . 2-Quote someone 3-Show a completed product. 4-Show an unusual object. 5-State a problem etc. After this attention-getter, you need to introduce yoursel f, usually just with your name, your club, and your year in 4-H. If you are giving a team presentation, you may introduce each other or each of you can each introduce yourself. Sometimes, it may even work for one person to introduce both of you. When your introduction is finished, you need to make a smooth transition into the body of your talk. Main body It is the part with contain 75% information of a presantation.It explain the whole idea of a presantation. A demonstration is the easiest to organize because you can simply go through the steps in order. The audience must know what is being done, how it’s being done, and why it’s being done. Arrange your points in a logical order and then give information to support each point. Examples of ways to organize points are to number them (1, 2, 3....); put them in a time frame (past, present, future); use narration (tell a story from beginning to end); or present them as a problem-effect-solution (state a problem, describe its effect, then suggest ways to solve the problem). No matter how you organize the body of your presentation, you must have clear transitions from point to point or step to step. There are many ways you can help the audience identify these transitions. Count on your fingers, step 1, step 2, etc. Use transition words such as then, next, finally, or one reason, another reason, or first, second, third. Pauses are a good 211-200C Parts of a Presentation 3 way to emphasize transition. . Try changing your position in front of the audience or switching posters. . All information you present in the body of your presentation must be accurate and understandable . You need to offer enough information to cover your topic thoroughly while eliminating any unnecessary information. . A demonstration is the easiest to organize because you can simply go through the steps in order. The audience must know what is being done, how it’s being done, and why it’s being done. The conclusion . Your conclusion should be short and concise. It should summarize or highlight the main points you made or emphasize what the audience should have learned. Do not restate everything you said in the body and never introduce new information at this time. Try to include some sort of link to your
  4. 4. introduction. Avoid false or multiple endings. End with a catchy phrase and leave the audience with a good impression. . Last, you need to ask for questions. Be sure that you repeat each question before you givean answer. Not only does this ensure everyone hears the question, but it gives you the chance to make sure you understood the question. If you get a question you can’t answer, simply say you don’t know. Never make up an answer or bluff. If possible, provide a resource where the answer could be found. It isn’t practical to offer to look it up and get back to the person. REFERENCES . After your conclusion, you need to state your sources of information. These could include books, magazine articles, or interviews with people. If you’ve used material from the Internet, don’t state entire websites. Just give key search words. . When there are no more questions, a simple “thank you” to finish is enough. Don’t thank the judge for listening or various people for giving you help Making the presentation Before: • Make a backup set of overheads in case your PowerPoint doesn’t work. Most of your lecturers do this! • Organise your technical requirements well before the presentation. This will allow you time to find the missing cords etc. • Check you have everything you need, e.g. a board marker, enough handouts. • If possible set the room up as you wish. Ask people to move if the room is unbalanced (e.g. everyone is huddled down the back). Make sure everyone can see you and your presentation. During: • If you are nervous, set up a prop, e.g., a large picture, map, or other item. Most eyes will be on this, not on you. If your hands are shaking, place them on an object like the podium to steady them. • Try not to move around too much but equally don’t stand stock-still like a statue. • Introduce yourself and outline your topic, • Try moving between formal delivery of important points and a more anecdotal style for examples/illustrations of a point. Ask questions to get them thinking. • Respect your audience; expect their respect in return. If people are chatting or not concentrating, stop and wait until you have their attention. • If you are using visual resources such as PowerPoint slides make sure you are not obstructing the audience’s view of them. Concluding: • Have a clear, practised conclusion or summary so that the audience knows what you have told them. • Ask for questions. If you do not understand the question ask them to rephrase it. If you do not know the answer say so. • Don’t rush back to your seat; stay standing and thank everyone calmly. Presentation checklist • Have you established the purpose/approach of your oral presentation? • Have you determined what the requirements are from your tutor?
  5. 5. • Are you familiar with all aspects of your presentation? • Have you prepared all the materials for your presentation? • Are you ready for questions or discussion? • Have you practised your presentation and checked time constraints? • Have you checked the room facilities and do you know how the equipment works?

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