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First settlements in the british isle

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Prehistory britain
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First settlements in the british isle

  1. 1. By Adriana Uslenghi Amoroso Ana Laura Marin Alfonso
  2. 2. 500.000 BC - People migrated from Europe. 250.000-300.000 BC-The Early Britons Human and Prehuman remains have been found in Britain, but these earliest inhabitants seem to have left during the last Ice Age, which ended about 50.000 years ago. 6500 BC - The land bridge connecting Britain to Europe was swamped as the sea level rises. As a result of that, the British peninsula became an Island. . -
  3. 3. 3100 BC Stonehenge started to build in what is now known as Wiltshire, dragging each stone into place 3000 BC New Stone Age begins: agriculture people arrived from Europe
  4. 4. THE BEAKER FOLK In 2000 BC people from Northern Europe came to Britain. They were known as Beaker Folk. Not much is known about these early inhabitants. They were organized in small communities, and as the population increased they moved from hunting-gathering to agriculture in a way alike to that of many other people across the world. The most important physical remnants of the early Britons are the great stone or megalithic circles. Bronze ornaments were their important achievement. They had religion already. Stonehenge was the evidence.
  5. 5. 2000 BC Stonehenge was completed. Use to be a burial ground.
  6. 6. 2150 BC People learned to make bronze weapons and tools 2100 BC Bronze Age begin
  7. 7. Bronze Age Britain ushered in a new world of commerce and trade ,many opportunities to gain wealth and prestige.This was a kind of golden age in the british history.
  8. 8. 1650 BC it began to form the trade routes 1200 BC the first small villages were formed
  9. 9. 750 BC Iron Age started: iron replaces bronze as most useful metal. Population about 150.000
  10. 10. The diffuse of cultural artifacts and styles we now call Celtic, was an important aspect of the long transition from Bronze Age to the Iron Age Britain. This was a turning point in the history because it would change what people lived and the settlement of Britain as a whole. Iron was the metal of the people ,working tools for working men.
  11. 11. Between 800-600 BC it was a big crisis, driving Britain into a period of social turmoil. As a result of that, it would utterly reshape British society. It became more locally, focused,people began to find local solutions to problems. 500 BC The Celtic people arrived from Central Europe.
  12. 12. Until the arrival of Celts there was not permanent homes. With them, starts the Tribes. This is a map based on the Atlas of Roman Britain.
  13. 13. The Celts ,also called Brythons, were farmers.Their fields tended to be long and narrow. Celtic lands were owned communally, and wealth has been based largely on the size of cattle herd owned. Celtic´s families were much extended like clans where children were raised by foster parents. Each clan had its own social structure and customs. One of the interesting innovations that The Celts brought to Britain was the method of iron ploughing. They made the farmlands permanent. Sheep and cattle were given shelter within the outer introduced iron wrought.
  14. 14. Another area where oral traditions were important was in the training of Druids. They were a curious lot; a sort of super- class of priests, political advisors, teachers, healers, and arbitrators.
  15. 15. They were tall, strong and muscular man with fair complexions; were high spirited, temperamental, and when they were not fighting, they were enjoying feasting. Spoke Celt language. The trace of it can still be found in Cornwall, Ireland and Wales and in the north-west of Scotland.
  16. 16. Their language as a written Celtic language, but it developed well into Christian times, so for much of Celtic history they relied on oral transmission of culture, primarily through the efforts of bards and poets. Druids could not read or write, but they memorized all the religious teachings, the tribal laws, history, medicine and other knowledge necessary in Celtic society.
  17. 17. Celtic warriors would cut off the heads of their enemies in battle and display them as trophies, by taking the head of a vanquished foe they were appropriating that power for themselves. It was a kind of bloody religious observance.
  18. 18. They were also warlike people, they fought against the people of Britain and other Celtic tribes. The Celts loved war. The main problem with the Celts was that they couldn't stop fighting among themselves long enough to put up a unified front. Each tribe was out for itself, and in the long run this cost them control of Britain. They were experienced fighters, armed with iron swords and daggers. A Celtic chief had a chariot. It was buried with him when he died. Wherever they went they conquered.
  19. 19. BIBLIOGRAPHY ● Burns, William E. A Brief History of Great Britain. Published 2010 ● McDowall, David. An Illustrated History of Britain. Published by Longman, 2006 ● Lang, Sean. British History For Dummies®, 2nd Edition. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 2006 ● Rolleston, Thomas William. Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race. Published by Constable and Company Limited, London 2010. OTHER RESOURCES http://www.britainexpress.com/History/Celtic_Britain.htm http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=celts+civilization+in+britain&FORM=HDRSC2 http://resources.woodlandsjunior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/history.html#Prehistoric http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/british_prehistory/stonehenge_stoneage.shtml http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Britain http://mind42.com/public/2975f9fb-5868-4771-8b82-9ac43aa7162c http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/british_prehistory

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