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Figurative language powerpoint

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Figurative language powerpoint

  1. 1. DEFINITION: Two unlike things compared together using the words like or as EXAMPLE: The weather is cooking like a barbeque.
  2. 2. DEFINITION: Two unlike things compared together without using the words like or as EXAMPLE: Little snowflake daggers poked my skin.
  3. 3. DEFINITION: A word or phrase that does not literally mean what it says; it has some other meaning. EXAMPLE: The reporters wanted to know the what the buzz is around town.
  4. 4. DEFINITION: A complete exaggeration to make a point, often used to create a humorous or mean effect EXAMPLE: The hill was covered with a billion flowers.
  5. 5. DEFINITION: An understated idea expressed by two negatives put together EXAMPLE: This is no ordinary drought we’re going through this decade.
  6. 6. DEFINITION: The act of spelling out the way a sound sounds. EXAMPLE: The steam whooshed through the manhole cover.
  7. 7. DEFINITION: Giving humanlike qualities to non-human objects or animals EXAMPLE: The flower stood tall amid the clovers.
  8. 8. DEFINITION: An item or thing that represents some larger idea of significance EXAMPLE: The stars and stripes flew high over the harbor.
  9. 9. DEFINITION: Making a reference to a part of another work of literature or historical story EXAMPLE: It felt like we were living in a Jack London novel there that night.
  10. 10. DEFINITION: Two unlike things being compared with two other unlike things EXAMPLE: Tires carved lines in the snow on the road like sprinters stay in their lanes in a race.
  11. 11. DEFINITION: Using the same consonant sound to start two or more nearby words in a sentence EXAMPLE: The friendly fog flirted with the water on the lake.
  12. 12. DEFINITION: Using the same vowel sound in two or more nearby words in a sentence EXAMPLE: Hope is a pole with holes beside so many roads.
  13. 13. DEFINITION: Using the same consonant sound at the middle or end of two or more nearby words in a sentence EXAMPLE: The sloshing answered wishes I’d treasured since childhood.
  14. 14. DEFINITION: When apparently contradictory words appear next to each other EXAMPLE: He came home and the barbed wire fence was found missing.
  15. 15. DEFINITION: a word or phrase that is used to stand in for another word EXAMPLE: After leading his countrymen in a revolt, he claimed the throne.
  16. 16. DEFINITION: A word or phrase that has a usually comical second meaning … you might even roll your eyes at it EXAMPLE: I'm reading a book about anti- gravity. It's impossible to put down.
  17. 17. DEFINITION: Using a word or phrase open to two interpretations, one of which is usually risqué or indecent EXAMPLE: The dry cleaners sign said, “Drop your pants here, and you’ll receive prompt attention.”
  18. 18. DEFINITION: A contrast between what is expected and what actually happens EXAMPLE: The fireman had never told anyone he was afraid of fire.
  19. 19. DEFINITION: Saying one thing, but meaning another thing EXAMPLE: The billboard said, “Texting while driving KILLS. For more driving tips, text SAFETY to 79191.””
  20. 20. DEFINITION: The use of irony to mock someone or show you think they’re lesser EXAMPLE: Speed Limit: 50 … unless, of course, Mr. Important is running late.
  21. 21. DEFINITION: A humorous or exaggerated imitation of something EXAMPLE: At the Star Wars coffee house, their motto is “May the Froth Be With You.”
  22. 22. DEFINITION: Poetry that shares strong feelings about something, exaggerates the good parts, packed with meaning EXAMPLE: Oh, sunset above the clouds, you are a flaming machete of eternity.
  23. 23. DEFINITION: A rare figurative language; uses one detail of a person (or thing) to represent the entire person EXAMPLE: The crowd applauded when the pair of fire sticks took the stage.
  24. 24. Another hornet buzzed into my ear, and it felt like someone had poured hot wax right down into my brain.
  25. 25. Another hornet buzzed into my ear, and it felt like someone had poured hot wax right down into my brain. Like is used to compare two unlike things: hornet = hot wax
  26. 26. "Mama, my finger. An angry thorn stabbed me," said Esperanza. "Bad luck," said Mama, confirming the superstition, but she half- smiled.
  27. 27. "Mama, my finger. An angry thorn stabbed me," said Esperanza. "Bad luck," said Mama, confirming the superstition, but she half- smiled. The thorn is angry, a human emotion.
  28. 28. He raised himself and crawled out of the water, his legs on fire.
  29. 29. He raised himself and crawled out of the water, his legs on fire. His muscles are really tired, but they aren’t actually on fire.
  30. 30. He says I’m a regular onion! I keep him busy peeling away the layers.
  31. 31. He says I’m a regular onion! I keep him busy peeling away the layers. He is comparing his personality to an onion that has all those layers.
  32. 32. We can't see those city lights and I love the way you look in a firefly glow, saying everything without making a sound.
  33. 33. We can't see those city lights and I love the way you look in a firefly glow, saying everything without making a sound. “Saying everything without making a sound” has opposite meanings next to each other.
  34. 34. The second I opened the closet door, Stradlater’s tennis racket -- in its wooden press and all -- fell right on my head. It made a big clunk and it hurt.
  35. 35. The second I opened the closet door, Stradlater’s tennis racket -- in its wooden press and all -- fell right on my head. It made a big clunk and it hurt. “Clunk” is the way you spell out that sound that was made when the racket hit him.
  36. 36. Winnie realized that sometime during the night she had made up her mind: she would not run away today.
  37. 37. Winnie realized that sometime during the night she had made up her mind: she would not run away today. “Made up her mind” doesn’t literally mean what it says. It means that she decided.
  38. 38. I am but, as you would say, a cobbler, a trade I hope I may use with a safe conscience; which is indeed, sir, a mender of bad soles.
  39. 39. I am but, as you would say, a cobbler, a trade I hope I may use with a safe conscience; which is indeed, sir, a mender of bad soles. “A mender of bad soles” has a double meaning with fixing bad souls.
  40. 40. He won the lottery and died the next day from a severe paper cut from his lottery ticket.
  41. 41. He won the lottery and died the next day from a severe paper cut from his lottery ticket. The source of his joy was the thing that killed him and took away his joy.
  42. 42. In easy state upon this couch, there sat a jolly Giant, glorious to see, who bore a glowing torch, in shape not unlike Plenty’s horn, and held it up, high up, to shed its light on Scrooge.
  43. 43. In easy state upon this couch, there sat a jolly Giant, glorious to see, who bore a glowing torch, in shape not unlike Plenty’s horn, and held it up, high up, to shed its light on Scrooge. Plenty’s horn is an ancient symbol from Greek mythology that pours out lots of blessing.
  44. 44. This morning some darling little ninth-grade honeybunny came up to me and asked me if I was Bloody Ben, and I began to explain that it was a kidney infection, and she giggled and ran away.
  45. 45. This morning some darling little ninth-grade honeybunny came up to me and asked me if I was Bloody Ben, and I began to explain that it was a kidney infection, and she giggled and ran away. Bloody Ben … both words begin with the letter b
  46. 46. Slowly the second wave forced the first one backward, rolled slowly over it, and then as a victor drags the vanquished, moved in toward the island.
  47. 47. The two waves are being compared to a victor and the vanquished. Slowly the second wave forced the first one backward, rolled slowly over it, and then as a victor drags the vanquished, moved in toward the island.
  48. 48. This song goes out... to all the people out there that be runnin' their mouth and don't know what they sayin'...
  49. 49. This song goes out... to all the people out there that be runnin' their mouth and don't know what they sayin'... This is dedicated to a certain group of people; therefore, it is an ode.
  50. 50. We strolled down the sidewalk, listening to porch swings creak with the weight of the neighborhood.
  51. 51. We strolled down the sidewalk, listening to porch swings creak with the weight of the neighborhood. The weight of the neighborhood = the soul’s burdens, the society’s wrongs, the hidden pain.
  52. 52. I huffed and puffed about my curfew and broke the rules.
  53. 53. I huffed and puffed about my curfew and broke the rules. The repeated f sounds in the middle of the words make consonance.
  54. 54. Nothing I can see but you when you dance, dance, dance.
  55. 55. The Nothing-but combo use a double- negative for a positive effect. Nothing I can see but you when you dance, dance, dance.
  56. 56. My milkshake brings all the boys to the yard, and they're like, it's better than yours.
  57. 57. Her milkshake is her body, and it makes boys thirsty for more, to be near her. My milkshake brings all the boys to the yard, and they're like, it's better than yours.
  58. 58. She put the her in hurt. She put the why in try. Yeah she's got a way … She's got a way with words.
  59. 59. The phrase “she’s got a way with words” is usually positive; here, she’s good at insulting and hurting. She put the her in hurt. She put the why in try. Yeah she's got a way … She's got a way with words.
  60. 60. “There wasn’t a breath in that land of death.”
  61. 61. “Wasn’t a breath” means that there aren’t any humans, so each breath represents a single person. “There wasn’t a breath in that land of death.”
  62. 62. I'm gonna fly like a bird through the night, feel my tears as they dry.
  63. 63. I'm gonna fly like a bird through the night, feel my tears as they dry. All the I sounds create the assonance effect of soaring through the air.
  64. 64. If you liked it then you shoulda put a ring on it.
  65. 65. If you liked it then you shoulda put a ring on it. The ring represents the marriage. If you liked it, you should have proposed marriage.
  66. 66. 'Til we can't remember, can't remember why we came here to forget.
  67. 67. The wording makes us hopeful to remember, until the word twist is about wanting to forget. 'Til we can't remember, can't remember why we came here to forget.

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