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Women and Social Movements in
Modern Empires Since 1820
Selections from Document Clusters on
Europe, Middle East, Asia, Af...
The Habsburg Empire, 1820-1918
2
Reference books, newspapers, periodicals, and letters from across the
Habsburg Empire
A B...
The British Empire, 1929-2012
Jo Coca-Cola Chahe, Ho Jaye!
The Story of How Coke
Deprives a Community of
Water
3
India Sou...
British Empire: Women in the Anti-Apartheid Movement in
South Africa, 1960-1997
4
Interview of Emma Mashinini by Diana
Rus...
The Japanese Empire, 1842-2001
The Woman’s Suffrage League in Japan began
publishing a bimonthly journal, Japanese
Women, ...
The Ottoman Empire and Post-Ottoman Empires in the
Balkans, 1820-1990
6
Essays, photographs, periodicals, conferences, and...
The Ottoman Empire and Post-Ottoman Empires in the
Eastern Mediterranean, 1860-2015
7
Conference participants, The
Arab Wo...
The Russian Empire, 1920-1929
8
This document cluster offers texts and translations from
the early 20th century Tatar wome...
The Dutch Empire, 1899-1965
9
South Africa
The South African War between
British settlers and descendants of
Dutch settler...
The French Empire, 1880-2005
1
Algeria
Tunisia
Assia Djebar, one of the most distinguished woman writers to
emerge from th...
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Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires Since 1820 - Selections from Document Clusters on Europe, Middle East, Asia, Africa

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The resources in this presentation include documents related to aspects of women and social movements in Europe, Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Explore documents on women’s struggles for emancipation, the history of women’s organizations, confronting gender inequality and much more.

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Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires Since 1820 - Selections from Document Clusters on Europe, Middle East, Asia, Africa

  1. 1. Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires Since 1820 Selections from Document Clusters on Europe, Middle East, Asia, Africa
  2. 2. The Habsburg Empire, 1820-1918 2 Reference books, newspapers, periodicals, and letters from across the Habsburg Empire A Biographical Dictionary of Women’s Movements and Feminisms: Central, Easter, and South Eastern Europe The World's Women's Congress in Budapest Értesíto General Austrian Women's Association, June 14, 1912 Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania, Poland, Ukraine, Serbia, and Italy
  3. 3. The British Empire, 1929-2012 Jo Coca-Cola Chahe, Ho Jaye! The Story of How Coke Deprives a Community of Water 3 India South Africa Part of a newspaper article about a protest led by African women. Includes photos of a burning bus, armed policemen and women protesters. Ireland The Ulsterwoman: A Monthly Journal of Union and Progress, Special Number, No. 1, July 12, 1919
  4. 4. British Empire: Women in the Anti-Apartheid Movement in South Africa, 1960-1997 4 Interview of Emma Mashinini by Diana Russell, South Africa, 1987. Interview of Florence de Villiers by Diana Russell, South Africa, 1987. This cluster vividly brings mid-1980s South Africa to life. With extensive interviews that preserve the diverse voices and perspectives of sixty women activists of the anti-apartheid movement, photographs and contemporary publications, this rich collection conveys a bitter but bracing taste of the determination and power with which South African women collectively confronted racial supremacy and gender inequality.
  5. 5. The Japanese Empire, 1842-2001 The Woman’s Suffrage League in Japan began publishing a bimonthly journal, Japanese Women, in 1938. The president of the league, Ichikawa Fusae (also, Fusaye), served as the journal’s editor-in-chief. During the late 1930s, as Japan’s imperial expansionism in Asia eroded international trust, friendship and cooperation, the league envisioned the journal as a way to stay in touch with feminists around the world. In the introductory essay of the first issue, Ichikawa expressed that goal, identifying fellow feminists as “co-workers” in the present “chaotic days” and “reactionary period.” Most issues contained a News in Brief column and described recent events as they affected women. These features show that a remarkable number of Japanese women continued to attend meetings abroad and foreign women leaders traveled to meetings in Japan despite international tensions. 5 From Comfort Women Speak: Testimony by Sex Slaves of the Japanese Military. Hwang Keum-ju was unmarried and eighteen years old when she received an official draft notice from the Japanese military. Under the impression that she would be working in a factory, she arrived at her departure point in Hamheung, Korea, dressed in nice clothes and with family in tow to see her off. Her train took her to Manchuria where, instead of doing factory work, she was forced to have sex with Japanese soldiers until Japan's surrender, four years later. She shared her story in 1994 and her desire not for monetary compensation but a show of "true repentance" from Japan. Korea
  6. 6. The Ottoman Empire and Post-Ottoman Empires in the Balkans, 1820-1990 6 Essays, photographs, periodicals, conferences, and newspapers from across the Ottoman Empire Bulgarian Women's Union Women’s World, Istanbul Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and Romania The resources in this cluster include documents related to aspects of women’s struggles for emancipation and the history of women’s organizations in Ottoman and Post-Ottoman Bulgaria, 1840-1940; government documents, reports and information from the period 1967-1973, regarding a variety of issues about women in socialist Albania; autobiographies, letters-in place of book prefaces, articles in women’s journals or newpapers, educational and electoral laws/decrees/circulars, cartoons, photos, and fiction from Greece, 1920-1990; and manuscripts, newspaper clippings, letters, posters and pictures gathered by two of the most important representatives of the Romanian feminism in the interwar period.
  7. 7. The Ottoman Empire and Post-Ottoman Empires in the Eastern Mediterranean, 1860-2015 7 Conference participants, The Arab Woman and the Case of Palestine, Eastern Women's Conference, Cairo, 1938. Egypt, Greece, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and North Africa Gnomi Feministou [An Opinion of a Male Feminist]. This collection of documents presents a unique window into women collaborating with and contesting the Ottoman Empire in the Eastern Mediterranean from 1860 to 1960. A series of imperial transitions from the 1880s to the early 1950s brought national independence. During these transitions, elite women often delivered services that colonial governments failed to provide, such as basic healthcare and primary education for girls. Documents in this collection include the voices of indigenous women’s rights activists—Turks, Syrians, Palestinians, Egyptians—discussing campaigns for national independence and women’s rights in the pages of women’s journals, pamphlets and conference proceedings. Of special interest are the Arabic original and the first English translation of the proceedings of Egyptian Women’s Union 1838 Cairo conference. Documents in this collection are drawn from archives in the United States as well as personal and state archives in Turkey, Egypt, and Lebanon.
  8. 8. The Russian Empire, 1920-1929 8 This document cluster offers texts and translations from the early 20th century Tatar women's movement in Russia, and from Uzbek women writing between 1906 and the 1930s. Central Eurasian women were subjects of the Russian Empire until the 1917 revolutions, and then became Soviet citizens whose conditions were shaped by the Communist Party of the USSR. Writers of the earlier documents were associated with the "Muslim Women's Association" in Russia. Of special interest are translations from the Uzbek women's journal Yangi Yo'l (New Path). From 1925 through 1929 its authors discussed modern-style schools for Uzbek girls, replacing Islamic family law with Soviet ideas of equality, and Uzbek women unveiling and interacting with men in society and work. Marianne Kamp is the translator and editor of those documents. Translator Claire Roosien provides Uzbek poetry from the early 1930s. Uzbekistan Yangi Yo’l
  9. 9. The Dutch Empire, 1899-1965 9 South Africa The South African War between British settlers and descendants of Dutch settlers known as Boers (and later as Afrikaners) was a defining moment in South African history. The war was part of the scramble for Africa, in which European powers seized most of Africa for exploitation. However, in this case the combatants on both sides were white, Christian and European. Diaries by women show the great extent to which this was a women’s war. British women served as nurses and teachers in the British concentration camps established to contain Boer civilians. About 10 percent of the Boer population died in the camps. This seminar was held in Jakarta during 17- 20 January 1961. The representatives were selected by their own villages. The seminar was a vital part of GERWANI’s advocacy work on behalf of women farm workers and peasants. Indonesia National Seminar for Women FarmersReport on the Concentration Camps in South Africa
  10. 10. The French Empire, 1880-2005 1 Algeria Tunisia Assia Djebar, one of the most distinguished woman writers to emerge from the Arab world, wrote Children of the New World following her own involvement in the Algerian resistance to colonial French rule. Djebar's novel sheds light on current regional conflicts by revealing, from the inside out, a determined Arab insurgency against foreign occupation. Memoire de Femmes compiles oral histories of Tunisian women. Interviews were supported by the French and Tunisian scholarly institutions. The book is printed in both French and Arabic with different oral histories in each section. The original interviews were conducted in dialectal Tunisian Arabic and translated into modern standard Arabic for publication.

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