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Die Empty

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Die Empty Book Review
Die Empty Book Review
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Die Empty

"Embrace the importance of now, and refuse to allow the lull of comfort, fear, familiarity, and ego to prevent you from taking action on your ambitions...The cost of inaction is vast. Don't go to your grave with your best work inside of you. Choose to die empty."

Most of us live with the stubborn idea that we'll always have tomorrow to do our most important and valuable work. We fill our days with frantic activity, bouncing from task to task, scrambling to make deadlines and chase the next promotion. But by the end of each day we're often left asking ourselves "did the work I do today really matter?" We feel the ticking of the clock, but we're stuck in first gear, unsure of the path forward and without a road map to guide us.

Here's the hard truth: sooner or later all of our tomorrows will run out, so how we choose to spend today is significant. Each day that we postpone difficult tasks and succumb to the clutter that chokes creativity, discipline, and innovation results in a net deficit to the world, our organizations, and ourselves.

Die Empty is a tool for people who aren't willing to put off their most important work for another day. Todd Henry explains the forces that keep us in stagnation, and introduces a process for instilling consistent practices into your life that will keep you on a true and steady course.

It's not about slaving over a project or living on a whim--it's about embracing the idea that time is finite and making the unique contribution to the world that only you can make. Henry shows how to cultivate the mind-set and the methods you need to sustain your enthusiasm, push through mental barriers, and unleash your best work each day. His guiding principles and checkpoints include:

• Define Your Battles: Counter aimlessness by defining your goals wisely and build your life around achieving them.
• Be Fiercely Curious: Prevent boredom from dulling your senses by approaching your work with a curious mind-set.
• Step Out of Your Comfort Zone: Make a valuable contribution to the world by getting uncomfortable and embracing lifelong growth and skill development.
• ...and many more.

Sure to bring a newfound clarity and a sense of urgency to how you approach your work every day, Die Empty will help you reach for and achieve your goals.

"Embrace the importance of now, and refuse to allow the lull of comfort, fear, familiarity, and ego to prevent you from taking action on your ambitions...The cost of inaction is vast. Don't go to your grave with your best work inside of you. Choose to die empty."

Most of us live with the stubborn idea that we'll always have tomorrow to do our most important and valuable work. We fill our days with frantic activity, bouncing from task to task, scrambling to make deadlines and chase the next promotion. But by the end of each day we're often left asking ourselves "did the work I do today really matter?" We feel the ticking of the clock, but we're stuck in first gear, unsure of the path forward and without a road map to guide us.

Here's the hard truth: sooner or later all of our tomorrows will run out, so how we choose to spend today is significant. Each day that we postpone difficult tasks and succumb to the clutter that chokes creativity, discipline, and innovation results in a net deficit to the world, our organizations, and ourselves.

Die Empty is a tool for people who aren't willing to put off their most important work for another day. Todd Henry explains the forces that keep us in stagnation, and introduces a process for instilling consistent practices into your life that will keep you on a true and steady course.

It's not about slaving over a project or living on a whim--it's about embracing the idea that time is finite and making the unique contribution to the world that only you can make. Henry shows how to cultivate the mind-set and the methods you need to sustain your enthusiasm, push through mental barriers, and unleash your best work each day. His guiding principles and checkpoints include:

• Define Your Battles: Counter aimlessness by defining your goals wisely and build your life around achieving them.
• Be Fiercely Curious: Prevent boredom from dulling your senses by approaching your work with a curious mind-set.
• Step Out of Your Comfort Zone: Make a valuable contribution to the world by getting uncomfortable and embracing lifelong growth and skill development.
• ...and many more.

Sure to bring a newfound clarity and a sense of urgency to how you approach your work every day, Die Empty will help you reach for and achieve your goals.

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Die Empty

  1. 1. Some Impressionistic takes from the book of Todd Henry “Die Empty” ( Unleash Your Best Work Everyday) by Ramki ramaddster@gmail.com
  2. 2. About Henry Hutcheson Henry is the founder and CEO of Accidental Creative, a consulting firm that helps organizations generate new ideas. His first book, The Accidental Creative (2011), offered strategies for how to thrive in the creative marketplace and was supported by a podcast of the same name. The imperative of the new book to “die empty” may sound exhausting, but it’s not about working yourself to the bone until you have nothing left to give. Instead, it’s about reminding yourself that your life is finite to create a sense of urgency that breaks the habit of putting your best work off until tomorrow. Many modern professionals are “busily bored,” cranking through a lot of work but not engaged or meeting their larger objectives. Henry provides a number of tactics and mental challenges to keep you focused on short, medium, and long-range goals. Keep this one by your bedside and read a section or two at the beginning or end of the day to keep yourself on track.
  3. 3.  Putting off the occasional tedious job until tomorrow won’t upset our life.  Constantly delaying big moves – writing our book, changing careers, and so on – can be devastating.  The problem is that we will eventually run out of tomorrows.  Many people succeed at the daily rush of life but never accomplish their “most important work.”  Author Todd Henry – who resolved to make the most of his life after a serious childhood illness – offers worthwhile ideas on how to reorganize our life and mind-set to accomplish everything we can.  Though Henry writes with passion about the moral and practical urgency of not wasting our life, his editorial presentation is a bit formulaic and burdened by platitudes, albeit sweet ones. Still, he has much to teach. I recommend his insights to people seeking the boost they need to seize their future Prelude
  4. 4.  When author Todd Henry was 16, he underwent a frightening medical emergency.  He woke up during the night and found he could not move his legs.  Terrified and in pain, he crawled to his parents’ room and moaned for help.  His frantic parents called an ambulance. Henry came to in the hospital the next morning with his worried family gathered around him.  The doctors couldn’t diagnose Henry’s problem, but spotted an unknown mass in his stomach. To determine the nature of the mass, they scheduled Henry for surgery.  “The way that we engage in our work ultimately affects the way that we engage in our life as a whole.” Am I going to Die ?
  5. 5.  The doctors identified the mass as a muscle that had swollen and expanded due to an infection in Henry’s stomach. The enlarged muscle put pressure on a central nerve, hampering Henry’s ability to walk and telling his body to shut down. The doctors successfully diagnosed Henry’s problem, but could do nothing about his horrible pain. Henry stayed in the hospital for almost two months, wracked with pain much of that time. He lost close to 50 pounds and had to learn to walk again.  “The rest of us need you to act, because if you don’t, you’re robbing yourself, your peers, your family, your organization and the world of a contribution that only you can make.”  While in the hospital, Henry passed his time listening to the radio. The reception was poor and the only station the radio could pick up played adult contemporary music. Once an hour it played the same song, “The Living Years,” by Mike + The Mechanics. He focused on one line from the song: “It’s too late when we die to admit we don’t see eye to eye.” Listening to this song playing over and over, day after day, Henry thought constantly about his near brush with death and how all his visitors were nervous in his room. They were obviously worried about saying the wrong thing during what might be their final conversations with him. Am I going to Die ?
  6. 6.  “Engaging in deeply gratifying work does not require you to check out of life, pack your bags and head off on a pilgrimage to India.”  During this fraught period, Henry made a firm promise: “When I get out of the hospital, I’m going to treat my life with more purpose. I’m going to act on the things that matter.” Although he was still just a teenager, Henry learned a valuable lesson: No one is immortal. One day, he, like everyone else, would die. He vowed to put every remaining minute of his life to meaningful use.  “As we progress in our careers and accumulate more knowledge, there are fewer experiences that instinctively spark our curiosity and challenge us to rise to the occasion.”  After his discharge from the hospital, Henry made his life more full and complete. He acted more boldly and took more risks. He wrote music and sang his songs for his friends. He threw himself into an ambitious physical-conditioning regimen to regain strength and agility. Although he’d been told that regaining his place on his school’s basketball team was unlikely, Henry proved the skeptics wrong. He developed dedication to making every moment and every decision count. Am I going to Die ?
  7. 7.  In 2005, the late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, touched on this subject in his commencement address at Stanford University. He said: “I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: ‘If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?’ And whenever the answer has been ‘no’ for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.” Jobs never accepted a life of complacency, because that leads to mediocrity.  “Give yourself permission to not know things. Some people see ignorance as a point of failure, but successful people see it as an acknowledgement of reality and an opportunity for growth.”  In 1999, Monster.com sponsored a brilliant Super Bowl ad entitled “When I Grow Up.” In it, little children tell each other their life goals. They say things like, “When I grow up, I want to file all day long.” “I want to claw my way up to middle management!” And “...be replaced on a whim.” “I want to be a ‘yes-man’!” At the end of the ad, this question appears: “What did you want to be?” Its message: No one ever chooses mediocrity or ordinariness as a goal, but for many people that turns out to be the destination. “If Today Were the Last Day of My Life...”
  8. 8.  “The key to long-term success is a willingness to disrupt your own comfort for the sake of continued growth.”  At the beginning of their careers, people develop great hunches. These could become brilliant accomplishments.  People get excited over their ideas, but the ceaseless demands of daily life intrude. Before long, the excitement wanes and stagnancy sets in.  People second-guess their hunches, which suddenly don’t seem so great. The original exciting ideas fade away, leaving behind regret and reminiscence.  “Work is core to the human experience.”  People lose their spark. Few things excite them. They don’t care about new ideas. In short, they become mediocre. That doesn’t necessarily mean lousy work or failed careers. People can appear successful even if they settled for second-best. They may not even be aware of making the choice. “If Today Were the Last Day of My Life...”
  9. 9. Definition - Work  Work is Core to the human experience  Any value we create that requires us to invest our time, focus, energy, and effort – whether in the context of occupation, relationship or parenting – is work.  Work is a reinforcement of that sense of being- of our sense of belonging- and a way to discover ourselves as we interact with the world around us  Meaningful to individual, Value to others
  10. 10.  We contribute value to the World using our available resources.  Every task we do & assignment we engage in with passion.  Every instant/effort to grow our skill/ capabilities & develop our mind  Every time we go to the extra mile even though we are exhausted Our Work- Not Occupation/ Designation
  11. 11. Our Body of Work Comprises the sum total of where we choose to place our limited focus, assets, time, energy and effort Work: Any instance where we make an effort to create value where it didn’t previously exists. Our Work is the most visible expression of our Priorities
  12. 12.  Work sometimes feels like one massive, melded blend of tasks, conversations and meetings  To truly unleash your full capacity/potential and to ultimately find your sewet spot of contribution, you must engage in all three kinds of work M a p p i n g , M a k in g a n d M e s h i n g Three Kinds of Work
  13. 13.  ‘Work before the Work ” - individually or with others  Planning  Strategy meeting  Setting priorities  Less tangible aspects of work, such as values, sense of why you do what you do  Fail to account for these, lose your focus and land in wrong direction Three Kinds of Work- Mapping
  14. 14.  Actually doing work ……..we did that  Making is what typically comes to mind when we think of work  Executing tasks, Tackling objectives  Creating value of any kind  Engaging with reports  Deliver tangible values Three Kinds of Work- Making
  15. 15. Easy to gravitate toward Making at the expense of other two kinds of work Most tactical of the three kinds of work, where it’s easiest to get distracted More moving parts, decisions with immediate impact, more opportunities for things to go awry. Must have some guiding principles to stay aligned and on task. Three Kinds of Work- Making
  16. 16.  Work between the ‘work ’ makes more effective  Rarely tied directly to results  Don’t get paid for it  Doesn’t show up in anyone’s organizations priority  Most important of long term success  Getting best work out of individuals and team Three Kinds of Work- Meshing
  17. 17.  Composed of activities that stretch and grow  Acquiring and developing new skills  Reinforcing and enhancing knowledge  Cultivating curiosity  Generating better understanding of the context for work  Paying attention to the adjacent spaces in industries Three Kinds of Work- Meshing
  18. 18. All of us have a tendency to gravitate toward one of the three kinds of work at the expense of other two and while the negative effects of neglect may not be evident in the short term, they can be disastrous in the long term
  19. 19. Four types of Worker Developer Mapping+Making+Meshing Driver Mapping+Making-Meshing Dreamer Meshing+Mapping-Making Dreamer Making+Meshing-Mapping
  20. 20.  Weaving resources & opportunities to create value  Works with urgency and diligence Does not work frantically  Making plan and execute them Learning from his actions and then redirecting as needed  Recognizes uncertainty is not enemy  Takes advantage from opportunities  Constantly developing skills to move to next level Developer = Mapping + Making + Meshing
  21. 21. Persistent focus, willingness to constantly disrupt and question not only what your doing , but how you are doing matters Actively engaging in all three kinds of work will be better positioned to Build a Body of work that you will be proud at later D e v e l o p e r Cultivating the Developer mind-set takes time
  22. 22. The Degree to which your contribution reflects your True Potential will be largely determined by how disciplined you are about improving your self- awareness and skills every day
  23. 23. Driver = Mapping + Making - Meshing  Extremely focus on results  Invests most of the time in planning & checking the tasks  Obsessed with today’s results  Becomes narrowly effective  Unable to spot opportunities  Wane in performance over time due to doing the more of the same  Neglecting to grow skills and develop the intangibles helps to tackle new challenges  Sheer will and determination is only one element of success  Fail to unleash full potential
  24. 24. Drifter = Meshing + Making - Mapping  Enjoys the process of making  Loves to develop skills and engage curiosity  Poor Planner, wasted opportunity  Good work ethic and quite successful in short bursts  Frequently bounces from work to work  Lacks the conviction of long term plan  Fails to follow through on many ideas  Have spotty success, never seems to sustain
  25. 25.  Obsessed with ideas, personal growth, & strategic plan  Lacks conviction, courage or ethic to put his plan in motion  Talker, rarely accomplish tasks Effective when they want, quickly lose interest  Always moving to the next thing Dreamer = Meshing + Mapping - Making
  26. 26. M e d i o c r i t y : D e f i n i t i o n Negotiation between the drive to excel and the biological urge to settle for the most comfortable option Doesn’t always mean underperforming Sliding scale and a state of mindCompromise of abilities & potential
  27. 27. Growth cycle is steep and rapid in career, when we constantly facing unfamiliar challenges and in need of developing new skills to deal with them. We grow stagnant, relying on existing skills , earn respect in the industry, but deep down NOT doing best work Startingofthecareer,everything new,workwithfullvigour,putour bestfootforwardtowinrespect, recognitionandtoprovethen becomeautopilot
  28. 28. M e d i o c r i t y Doesn’t mean doing poor work Doesn’t mean failing to achieve success Appear very successful to others Outwardly unimpressive to others yet to be maximizing your abilities Deep down you are settling Mediocrity is thoroughly subjective & relative
  29. 29. Satisficing (Satisfy + Sufficing)  Don’t get the same level of satisfaction once did  Progress but NOT important progress  Invisible force holding and feel trapped  Begin to experience a fear of choosing poorly  Become paralyzed with inaction  Exchange aspiration for practical ones  Fit better with expectations of others  Settle for the best available option to meet most of our expectations
  30. 30. 7 Deadly Sins of Mediocrity
  31. 31. Aimlessness  You have no strategy, central theme, overall design or grand motif in life.  This robs you of joy and gratification. Establish a “through line,” a basic theme for your one and only life.  Focus your passion and efforts on this theme.  Following this theme will make it easier to decide when and where to act.  Pick your battles and do everything possible to win them.  Try to achieve “productive passion” – a focus on others. Working “on behalf of” someone else is much more inspiring than leading life for just yourself.
  32. 32. Aimlessness  The fix is to know your Sense of purpose.  Define the battle you want to fight to get meaningful gain.  What is the transformation you want to see in the world.  Create a through line for your life - stand on principle;  Ask "what can I add" vs "what can I get"  Passion doesn't mean you just follow your whims - it's what you decide is worth suffering for  Productive passion: motivates you and is productive to others  You can find hints concerning your passion by thinking about what gives you compassionate anger or an urgency to act; what problems are you obsessed with solving even if it comes at your own expense  What will you stand for today?  What do you know you should be doing but ignoring?  Where are your open loops? For open projects and commitments; use values and mission to decide which ones to keep and which ones to ignore.
  33. 33. Boredom  This sin steals your passion and creativity. Boredom is the curse of professionals – “the busily bored” – who accomplish a great deal at work without true mental engagement.  They tread water, don’t stretch themselves and rarely try anything new.  To counteract boredom, become more structurally curious about everything around you.  Give yourself time to engage mentally with the world. Keep a notebook for writing down your questions about life and set aside the time to find the answers. Problem finding is increasingly more critical than problem solving
  34. 34. Boredom  The cure is disciplined curiosity; Embrace mystery - ask why, how, what if?  Don't be the busily bored - reclaim curiosity by targeting engagement mind-set vs entertainment mind-set  Best ideas come during lulls; remove sources of frivolous entertainment; and seek to ask new and better questions, gain new perspectives**  Curse of familiarity; awareness gives illusion of knowledge and understanding; deep dive, don't jet ski; take time to test ideas against your experiences  Establish hunting trails by creating systems:  Before any interaction or activity, create a list of questions you want to be answered ***  Create list of must-read books and experiences; keep resources of interesting materials  Prototype relentlessly; helps you make progress with low risk  Find your bliss station: find place to do life's work; hour and place to bring forth who you are and could be ***  Develop possibility thinking and find clear boundaries by redefining problem:
  35. 35. Boredom For your project, ask yourself:  Aspirations - What is the ultimate end if all problems were solved? What is this project aspiring to become?  Affinities - What similarities are there between current project and past projects? What is this like? Where have I seen something similar?  Assumptions - What are the perceived limits? What assumptions might I be making?  Attributes - What are the key characteristics of the problem? What does it look, sound, feel like?  When you're blocked:  Conceptual (hard to see the big picture) - ask different questions: What am I really trying to accomplish? What is this problem like? What inspires me now?  Executional - Where do I feel most constraint? Where do I feel out of control? what do I not understand?  Converse with other on ideas that are interesting to you
  36. 36. Comfort  People who select comfort as their primary goal forgo real progress toward the future.  Operating routines – maintaining the status quo – take precedence over possible innovations.  To counteract the consuming quest for comfort, don’t automatically run away from being uncomfortable.  Commit yourself to future growth. Learn to take a risk. Be willing to “walk into dark rooms.”  Develop a “say yes” attitude about everything. Don’t shirk. Assume “ownership” of your life. Love of Comfort is Frequently Enemy of Greatness
  37. 37. Comfort  The fix is not to make comfort your goal; Commit to continual growth & achievement  Constantly reinventing and stretching yourself is uncomfortable;  Imagine a biographer following you around for the full day and taking copious notes of your actions and underlying motivations and will then write a definitive biography about you that you can't dispute - how will you act? Actions define us not intentions .  Say "yes" - take risk at critical juncture - don't default to comfortable choice; ok if you're not ready  You don't grow by doing what is expected of you - ignore "Who do you think you are?"  What would you think about your decision when you look back at age 80?  Waiting is a less risky form of "no" - give yourself permission. People make maps by moving - when you stand still, hard to know what to do.  Be personally responsible for your growth
  38. 38. Comfort When stepping out of your comfort zone, consider the following timeframes: Step - short daily goal (what will I do no matter what) Sprint - one to two weeks Stretch - long-term goal that is outside of your comfort zone; Develop business and work skills Hone mental processes Cultivate relationships Personal/spiritual Step should help you sprint should help you stretch What skills should you develop to add more value to others? Define what you will give up to accomplish it. What are you not doing because of fear, ego, safety, etc.?
  39. 39. Delusion  People are great at fooling themselves about all sorts of things, including their own capabilities and talents.  They tell themselves stories about the world – and themselves – that have either positive or negative consequences.  To counter self-delusion, develop self-awareness. Know who you are and what you can achieve.  Set high goals for yourself. Emulate the people you respect.  Select attributes from their lives that enable you to “become more of who you are, not more of who they are.”  Create a code of ethics for yourself and stick to it.
  40. 40. Delusion  The fix is to cultivate self-awareness, be honest with yourself and understand your skills  Common narratives that lead to delusion and affects judgment  You should be rewarded for your work  Recognition for your work is all important; leads you to lose touch with your own meaning of excellence  You are worth only what you create  I have to win everything  The person who dies with most stuff wins  Helpful narratives:  Emulate your superheroes and take on positive attributes  List 5 qualities of people you admire and Cultivate qualities that intimidate you  What resonates with you? Note these when they come and be specific about what you admire  What complicates your life? Challenge your assumptions  Reflect on your day - what went well? Note patterns  Establish a code of ethics  Exude excellence, add value, be curious, learn, instil confidence and trust  Be authentic and move forward in face of uncertainty  Know yourself first and then go out on your own
  41. 41. Fear  Being frightened has more to do with what people imagine than what actually exists.  Nevertheless, fear generates genuine, painful feelings.  Many people fear trying to do what they want most in life, for example, pursuing a career as an artist.  Instead, people engage in “shadow pursuits by doing work in fields that relate only indirectly to their primary desires.  To counter leading a “shortchanged” life, start taking chances and accepting risk.
  42. 42. Fear  The fix is to experiment and practice strategic and intentional risk- taking  Don't wait to be given permission to do great work.  Actively seek opportunities to do great work and overcome the risk  Don't be afraid to take yourself seriously  Walk towards your dreams - be intentional about what you're doing by observing and reflecting  Be willing to face rejection; pursue what you MIGHT be able to do  Plan for experimentation and play with ideas  Apply peripheral aptitudes to work; what other skills do you have  Open your eyes and follow inspiration  Do the obvious; brilliant work doesn't need to be complex  Don't rely on imitation alone.
  43. 43. Ego  Puffed up, proud people can never accept failure. If the ship is going down, they go with it rather than admit defeat.  Clearly, this is not a formula for success.  To counter egotistical traps, embrace humility. Accept that you do not know everything.  Go learn more.  Become more adaptable.  Correct mistakes instead of glossing over them.  Avoid a sense of entitlement, because it can interfere with your ability to engage with the world.. Fa i l u re s h o u l d b e a l e a r n i n g e x p e r i e n c e N OT a s h a m i n g e x p e r i e n c e
  44. 44. Ego  Overcome your fear of failure; adopt adaptability to learn  When things go wrong, the first instinct is to establish a rule to ensure it doesn't happen again; when you make rules, people remove needs for personal accountability and creates unnecessary complexity;  Don't strive for control - strive for influence!! *  Playing victim relinquishes control; don't knowingly withhold your best work  Cynicism forfeits your sense of wonder and makes you discount the obvious  Expecting to be accommodated might cause you to withhold your best; your need for recognition should not stop your best work; take a stand for your work  Confident vs overinflated ego  I can get this right vs I can do no wrong  I'm valuable vs I'm invaluable (value because of presence)  Strategic compromise is essential vs bend to me always  Track record shows competence vs. track record shows invulnerability (rewrites history to protect self-worth)  I'm not explaining well vs you don't get me  Progression vs protection (Failure not an option)
  45. 45. Ego  Prevent ego inflation  Where am I putting myself ahead of my work?  Where do I feel slighted or entitled?  Where do I assume success? ***  Cultivate service mind-set: what can I offer vs what can I get (entitlement)  Encourage and recognize others: write note, make call, mark a moment  Get real with SWOT  Strengths: what unique value can I offer consistently  Weaknesses: where am I failing consistently? What skills do I need?  Opportunities: where can I add value in coming weeks and months?  Threats: where am I most vulnerable with a chance of failing? How can I mitigate failure?
  46. 46. Guardedness  People isolate themselves when they become too busy or feel mounting pressure.  This restricts their personal growth and renders collaboration impossible.  To counteract guardedness, become sensitive to your relationships.  Don’t curtail them; expand them. Go out of your way to connect with others.  Try to have meaningful “clarity” conversations that help you eliminate dissonance.  Engaging in an “expectation conversation” can enable you to avoid operating with “false assumptions.”  An “engagement conversation” helps you gauge the enthusiasm of those around you. T h e b e s t d e f e n s e i s a l m o st a l w ay s a n a t - t h e – r e a d y o f fe n s e
  47. 47. Guardedness  Easy to isolate from other people; the fix is to find times and ways to connect with others  Don't defer important conversations and discuss differences in opinions  Identify people who can be mirrors for you who are honest and trustworthy;  Conversations to start at work:  Clarity conversation: get info you need to do your work;  How does what I'm doing tie into why our company exists?  Is there anything we are doing that seems out of character for us?  Do I know what is expected of me?  What do you expect from me? Am I falling short?  Fear conversation:  What are you afraid might happen and why?  What risks should I take at work?  What's inspiring you?  How do you feel about the work we are doing?  What is the best thing we are doing and why?  What is something I'm doing that doesn't make sense?  What are the positive things I'm doing?  What's something obvious that I'm not doing?
  48. 48. Self-awareness: Belief & Assumptions  Deeply held beliefs that hold about the work place, your abilities and the motivations of your peers can affect your behaviour  We become coded with assumptions about the world works, our place in it and what we are and w are not capable of.  Over time these beliefs become solidified and we act reflexively.  These assumptions can rule our behaviour, career choices, relationships and capacity for effectiveness Self-awareness is a willingness to explore whether your beliefs about wrk place line up with the reality of your situation
  49. 49. Values & Code of Ethics  Identifying the things that you hold dear-values  They are passive, not active imperatives  Code of ethicsis a series of words that concretely defines how you will engage in work.  Defines ahead of time how you will make decisions, interact with others, and make choices when things get difficult
  50. 50.  Willing to take a stand on behalf of the work and what they believe is right  I can get this right  Acts, observes & redirects  I valuable  Willing to subvert their own interest for the sake of the work  Potentially compromise when there is a strategic advantage  See past failures as learning  My track record demonstrate competence.  I am not explaining it well  Willing to work through communication  More concerned with what they will be perceived and how much credit they will receive  I can do no wrong  Create blind spots that prevents to see the obvious areas of vulnerability  Do not calculate the risk because they don’t really want to know the answer  I am invaluable  They believe they add value by their presence  Willing to compromise the overall effectiveness of a project for the sake of getting the credit  Rationalize past failure or rewrite history in order to protect their self-worth  My track record demonstrates invulnerability  You don’t get me  Shifts the blame for communication issues to the other party C o n f i d e n t P e r s o n Over inflated Ego P e r s o n
  51. 51. Great work results when you stop doing only what you know you can do and instead begin pursuing what you believe you might be able to do with a little focussed effort
  52. 52. Intention and Theory do not Change the World; Decisive Action Does Measure you’re your work by daily progress on what matters to you. Don’t worry about being Great in the eyes of others; Focus on Excelling at your work
  53. 53.  Many people cope with life’s rush but never complete their “most important work.”  Keep in mind that you will run out of tomorrows.  Long-range goals depend on the steady completion of daily tasks.  Mediocrity springs from seven deadly sins: “aimlessness, boredom, comfort, delusion, ego, fear and guardedness.”  Engage in three specific types of work: “mapping,” “making” and “meshing.”  Mapping is planning; making is doing; meshing is preparing for the future.  Be a “developer” who plans, works and prepares, and not a “driver” who works hard but never prepares for the future.
  54. 54.  Don’t be a “drifter,” going from project to project, or a “dreamer,” who only plans and never executes.  Follow the EMPTY acronym to make your life full:  Focus on  “Ethics, Mission, People, Tasks and yourself.”  How would you evaluate your achievements and priorities if today were the last day of your life?
  55. 55.  E - focus on your code of ethics; review everything and how you will apply your ethics, what are potential pitfalls  M - focus on mission; how will you know you have succeeded? What do you want to do that you're not doing; what needs to go away?  P - focus on people. Look at people you interact with and how you will enhance the relationship  T - focus on tasks; what absolutely must get done and schedule on calendars  Y - focus on you. How are you developing yourself? Scan your life for action points - daily checkpoint EMPTY
  56. 56.  Get started - Be grateful -Dream a little  Nurture your process - only thing you can control  Don't follow other people's maps; no lasting success without failure  Regularly scan for 7 sins  Remember that decisive action is necessary  Doesn't matter what we expect from life but rather what does life expects from us; stop trying to be great and just be great  Don't focus on being great to others, just focus on delivering great work  Remember there is a lag between cause and effect. Hard to hustle in the lag. Always a delay between planting and sowing. To fight lag, have a clear vision and don't get distracted by other activities; make daily diligent urgent progress ***  Choose to quit - it's a strategic choice; don't quit to run away from fear or discomfort  Be optimistic - expect best through effort;  Ask - What did you fail at this week? This is your driver of growth  Find ways to add value to the market and to the lives of others.  When you stop challenging yourself, you stop growing. Tips
  57. 57. You have a finite amount of focus, time, and energy to offer the world, and it can never be reclaimed once it’s spent. Focus on What’s Next. Your Life will be measured by What you gave , NOT What you Receive.
  58. 58. Mail your comments to ramaddster@gmail.com

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