SlideShare une entreprise Scribd logo
1  sur  14
Télécharger pour lire hors ligne
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/01/2017
Bonjour,
Voici la revue de presse IoT/data/energie du 1 janvier 2017.
Je suis preneur d'autres artices / sources !
Bonne lecture et bonne année !
Romain
Table des matières
1. What’s The Advantage Of Tesla’s 1.3 Billion Miles Of Data? Bloomberg Says…
2. Diamond Batteries Could Use Nuclear Waste to Generate Electricity for Millennia
3. The 5 IoT products a smart city needs in 2017
4. Will IoT actually keep us coal-dependent?
5. Joseph Desmond: “Instead of using fossil fuels to create the steam, BrightSource
uses the sun.”
6. Baidu et KFC proposent des menus à la tête du client
7. IA : on ne joue plus… ou alors à se faire peur
What’s The Advantage Of Tesla’s 1.3
Billion Miles Of Data? Bloomberg Says…
Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/31/whats-advantage-teslas-1-3-billion-
miles-data-bloomberg-says/
December 31st, 2016 by James Ayre
Tesla has reportedly now gathered more than 1.3 billion miles of data from Autopilot-
equipped vehicles, data that’s been obtained whether Autopilot was being actively used
or not. What’s the value of all of this data? Does it give the company a significant
advantage in the self-driving sector over its potential competitors?
That line of thought is something we covered previously when comparing Tesla’s self-
driving approach with Google’s, but it was explored in a recent article from Bloomberg as
well that seems worth discussing here. There are some interesting quotes from various
sources that know the topic well.
Here are the parts in question that I’m referring to:
“Of course, not all miles are created equal: there are semi-autonomous as well as fully
self-driving ones, real-world vs simulated, highway vs those racked up in tricky urban
environments. Still, Tesla is ‘in a very unique position to push the state of the art of
algorithmic driving and machine learning in personal transport,’ said Adam Jonas, the
lead analyst at Morgan Stanley for autos and shared mobility, in a recent note to clients.
…
“’Whether they are ahead or not, Tesla certainly has tons of data,’ said Richard Wallace,
director of transportation systems analysis at the Center for Automotive Research in Ann
Arbor, Michigan. ‘They will be able to analyze that six ways from Sunday and continue to
tweak their algorithms.’ …
“’Most car companies and tech companies don’t want to give away how far along they
are. Elon, of course, is the exception — he’s always out there claiming how far ahead of
everyone else he is,’ stated Karl Brauer, executive publisher for Kelley Blue Book. As
companies boost their intelligence gathering, ‘the level of data that will be generated is on
a scale that is hard for us to conceive. This is the tip of the iceberg.'”
Nothing necessarily “new” in those comments, but still worth covering. To my eyes, Tesla
holds a significant advantage already because of its approach, but, more importantly, the
advantage will widen to a substantial degree with the launch of the Model 3 late next year
(late 2017). With 500,000 Model 3s hitting the road in just a year or so, all loaded with a
hardware suite allowing for fully autonomous driving, all silently gathering data to be used
for the refinement of the company’s software, the company really shouldn’t have too
much trouble outclassing its competition.
Diamond Batteries Could Use Nuclear
Waste to Generate Electricity for
Millennia
Source URL: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/news/diamond-batteries-could-use-
nuclear-waste-to-generate-electricity-for-mille/
Nuclear waste takes thousands of years to decay. But that long-lived radioactivity could
be exactly what makes these nuclear waste diamond batteries last for millennia.
Researchers at the University of Bristol have used graphite, the waste product of nuclear
reactors, to develop a man-made diamond which produces electricity when placed in
close proximity to a radioactive source. Although these batteries produce only a small
amount of current, they offer an incredibly long battery life of thousands of years.
Making Use of Nuclear Waste
Nuclear reactors need graphite blocks to control heat flow and nuclear reactions. When
exposed to radioactive uranium rods, the graphite blocks gradually become radioactive,
as well. When a nuclear plant gets decommissioned, graphite blocks are one of the main
radioactive waste products which need to be handled.
Carbon-14 is the radioactive version of carbon which is found at the surface of graphite
blocks. The radiation of this carbon isotope cannot penetrate even a few centimeters of
air, but it is not still safe to allow into the environment. The UK currently has almost 95,000
tonnes of radioactive graphite blocks. Researchers believe that, by extracting carbon-14,
the majority of the graphite’s radioactive material can be removed. As a result, the cost
and danger of storing graphite would be significantly reduced.
Researchers have found a method to reuse these graphite blocks to generate electricity
out of the radioactive waste. First,theyheat the graphite blocks and turn them into a gas.
Then, the radioactive gas is compressed to grow a diamond.
The beta particles emitted by the radioactive material interact with the crystal lattice and
throw off electrons.
The result? A radioactive diamond that can generate electricity for thousands of years.
To prove the feasibility of the technique, the research team has designed a prototype
nuclear battery using a nickel isotope, nickel-63, as the radioactive source. However, they
are planning to use carbon-14 in their future designs.
No Emissions, No Maintenance!
Unlike many conventional methods of producing electricity which rely on moving a
magnet inside a coil of wires, the nuclear-powered batteries have no moving parts and the
electricity is generated by simply placing the man-made diamond in close proximity to a
radioactive source.
To shield the radioactive diamonds and make them safe to handle, a non-radioactive
diamond coating is also grown. Dr. Neil Fox from Bristol's School of Chemistry explains
that these nuclear batteries have no radioactive threats to the user. He notes that carbon-
14 has short-range radiation which can be completely confined within the world’s hardest
material: diamond. This non-radioactive diamond coating means that someone in close
proximity to a nuclear battery would receive as much radiation as they would sitting next
to a banana!
According to Professor Tom Scott of the university's Interface Analysis Centre, the nuclear
batteries not only have negligible emissions but they also do not require any maintenance.
This fact alone means that nuclear diamonds could be used in areas that are dangerous—
or downright impossible—for maintenance workers to reach.
Potential Applications of a Diamond Battery
The bad news is that the produced current is not high enough to power a smartphone.
However, the long battery life makes the technology appealing especially for applications
where it is not easy or even possible to recharge the battery or replace it with a new one.
The longevity of these batteries, which is connected to the half-life of the nuclear waste's
radiation, can be crucially important in applications such as designing pacemakers,
satellites, spacecraft, and high-altitude drones.
Researchers estimate that nuclear batteries based on carbon-14 will generate above 50%
of their maximum power for as long as 5,730 years –– equal to the whole time the human
civilization has existed. Hence, with this technology, it would be possible to power
interstellar probes long after they lose solar power.
Lithium-Ion, Nuclear Battery, or Another Alternative?
Unfortunately, over the last few years, the battery industry has been cruel to many
promising solutions. Researchers in this field need not only to solve many technical
problems but also take the technology into the commercial realm. This is not at all easy
because even a small battery manufacturer needs to invest nearly $500 million. In fact,
according to MIT's Technology Review, one of the main reasons that new battery
technologies do not get commercialized is the lack of funding and focus.
Many manufacturers prefer to rely on the incremental improvement of lithium-ion batteries
—which has been exceedingly slow, despite some recent, promising research into
increased Li-ion capacity—rather than accept the initial huge investment of a new battery
which would offer a dramatic improvement over conventional batteries. In October 2015,
Lux Research published a report which predicted the lithium-ion battery as the main
choice of energy storage for the years ahead.
The nuclear-powered batteries can simultaneously solve a few of today’s serious
problems such as nuclear waste disposal, clean electricity generation, and battery life.
However, is there a clear path to seeing this technology commercialized? We face some
serious questions: Is it economical to convert nuclear wastes into diamond batteries? Or
are there only some particular applications that these batteries really lend themselves to?
The details of this technology were discussed at the Cabot Institute's sold​out annual
lecture––"Ideas to change the world"–– in November.
The 5 IoT products a smart city needs in
2017
Source URL: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/the-5-iot-products-a-smart-city-
needs-in-2017/
Connected IoT devices are part of the key elements of a smart city. Here are some of the
most interesting and useful products for smart cities in 2017.
Public safety and public services are key elements of a smart city. Whether a city is
seeking smarter streetlights, more efficient waste removal, or gunshot detection, there are
smart city products that stand out more than others. Here are some of the best and most
useful devices that were used in smart cities around the world in 2016 and that will be
vital in 2017.
1. Bigbelly
Bigbelly is a smart waste and recycling system that has been deployed in all 50 US states
and in 50 countries. It provides a solar-powered compacting waste bin that allows for up
to five times the amount of waste as in a traditional bin, and it also alerts the appropriate
city department when it needs to be emptied, according to Leila Dillon, vice president of
marketing for Big Belly.
This means that the number of trash bins in a city can be reduced by 70-80%, which
makes the streets more aesthetically appealing, and it reduces the rodent population.
Philadelphia, San Diego, Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago areamong the cities that
use Bigbelly waste bins.
2. ShotSpotter
XXXXx
3. Digital kiosks
A digital kiosk gives information about restaurants, retail stores, and events in the
immediate area. It also provides mapping for visitors, and can sync with a mobile phone
to give additional data as needed.
This is one of the 25 digital kiosks in place in Kansas City, Mo.
Image: Kansas City
In Kansas City, Mo., there are 25 digital kiosks installed within a 2.2-mile area as a living
lab to test smart technology for the city. The city worked with Cisco to install the smart
city tech and digital kiosks.
4. Smart streetlights
Connected LED streetlights are the easiest way for a city to add smart tech. One benefit is
reduced crime, because the lights automatically brighten when there are multiple people
in the area, and dim when no one is around.
Los Angeles has replaced old streetlights with smart versions.
Image: City of Los Angeles
The ROI is a no-brainer, with the LED lights saving more on energy costs within a few
years than it costs to purchase and install them.In Los Angeles, the city saves nearly $9
million annually on utility costs as a result of its decision to spend $57 million to convert
nearly 80% of its 215,000 old sodium-vapor streetlights to LED versions.
5. Parking sensors
Imagine driving through a city, and accessing a mobile app that tells you when a parking
spot is available. Parking sensors make this happen by sending a signal that indicates
whether a parking spot is taken.
European cities were early adopters of this technology. In Paris, France, the average
resident spends four years of their life looking for a parking spot, according to Cisco. With
widespread use of parking sensors, traffic in Paris has dropped dramatically. Kansas City
is one of the first US cities to add parking sensors, but many other US cities are
considering it, or testing it in small areas.
Will IoT actually keep us coal-dependent?
Source URL: http://readwrite.com/2016/07/11/internet-things-coal-power-pt4/
There are quite a few arguments for renewable energy investment, but one argument used
against renewables was the cost factor. Five years ago, we started to see that cost gap
close, leading countries like Germany, China, the United States to ramp up investment
into solar farms.
We may see a slow down on that investment, due to new Internet of Things (IoT) tools
that lower the costs of running a coal plant and reduce the amount of emissions.
GE, IBM, Siemens, and Schneider Electric have all launched digital power plant systems
—for renewable, gas, and coal plants—that lower costs, emissions, and boost efficiency.
The improvements, while helpful for the businesses and towns that stay open thanks to
coal power, may also prolong our use of coal as the dominant power source.
According toMIT Technology Review, an Italian plant shut down in 2014 due to excess
electricity and reduced prices, but reopened in 2016 due to operation enhancements from
GE’s hardware and software.1
The plant is now able to go from dormant to fully operational in two hours, down from
three hours under the old system, which vice president of A2A Massimiliano Masi says is
a huge improvement.
Coal plants use IoT to gain efficiency
On top of operational speed, GE’s system can improve energy efficiency from 33 to 49
percent. This means more electric power can be captured while burning the same amount
of coal, leading to a reduction in emissions.
While this may lead to a cleaner, smarter coal power system, it also allows factory owners
to keep the plant running for longer. That would leave us at the same position, in terms of
emissions, as we are at currently.
For environmentalists, the invasion of IoT into coal plants may be seen as a disaster, but
plenty of towns rely heavily on the factories for jobs.
In the U.S., coal power accounts for around 33 percent of electricity production, but it has
been dropping for a few years as renewable energy and natural gas make gains. We don’t
think the small gains from IoT will have a major impact here, but in China and India, it may
prolong the dominance of coal power and inflate the co2 emissions for another
generation.
Joseph Desmond: “Instead of using fossil
fuels to create the steam, BrightSource
uses the sun.”
Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/28/joseph-desmond-instead-using-
fossil-fuels-create-steam-brightsource-uses-sun/
December 28th, 2016 by The Beam
This week, Anne-Sophie Garrigou, journalist at The Beam, interviewed Joseph Desmond,
Senior Vice President of Marketing and Government Affairs for BrightSource Energy, a
company founded in 2006 which became a leader in solar thermal technology. By
concentrating the sun’s energy, the company produces high-value steam for electric
power, petroleum and process markets worldwide. We talked to Joseph Desmond about
BrightSource Energy’s vision and aspiration to build a carbon-free future.
The Beam: At BrightSource Energy, you have developed a solar thermal energy
system. Can you explain to us what it means and how it works?
Joseph Desmond: BrightSource Energy designs, develops and deploys solar thermal
technology to produce high-value electricity and steam for power, petroleum and
industrial-process markets worldwide. BrightSource combines breakthrough technology
with world-class solar power plant design capabilities to generate clean energy reliably
and responsibly. BrightSource’s solar thermal systems are designed to minimize impact
on the environment and help customers reduce their dependence on fossil fuels.
Our solar thermal energy systems generate power the same was as traditional power
plants — by creating high temperature steam to turn a turbine. However, instead of using
fossil fuels to create the steam, BrightSource uses the sun.
At the heart of BrightSource’s proprietary solar thermal system is a state-of-the-art solar
field design, optimization software and a control system that allow for the creation of
high-temperature steam. Thousands of software-controlled mirrors track the sun in two
dimensions and reflect the sunlight to a boiler that sits atop a tower. When the
concentrated sunlight strikes the solar receiver, it heats water to create superheated
steam. The steam is either piped from the boiler to a conventional steam turbine to
produce electricity, where transmission lines will carry the power to homes and
businesses, or the steam is used in industrial process applications such as thermal
enhanced oil recovery (EOR).
By integrating conventional power block components, such as turbines, with our
proprietary technology and state-of-the-art solar field design, electric power plants using
our systems can deliver cost-competitive, reliable and clean power when needed most.
We can also integrate proven molten salt storage of hybridize with a fossil fuel, further
increasing output and reliability, and significantly reducing energy costs.
What does it take to realize carbon-free energy?
There are many forms of renewable support structures available and what is effective for
one country may not be as effective for another. The choices depend on the policy
objectives of the government and the type of investment behavior the government wishes
to incentivize. Additionally, development costs for the same technology can vary
geographically, including by permitting jurisdiction and by applicable labour rates.
Regardless of the support mechanism, however, it’s policy consistency and clarity that
most effectively builds confidence and attracts capital.
Baidu et KFC proposent des menus à la
tête du client
Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/baidu-et-kfc-proposent-des-menus-a-la-tete-du-
client-165839.html
En s’appuyant sur la reconnaissance faciale, un KFC en Chine propose des menus
adaptés en fonction de l’âge, du sexe et de l’humeur du client.
On savait que les automates prenaient le pouvoir dans les enseignes de restauration
rapide. Ils vont en plus vous suggérer des menus en fonction de votre âge et de votre
sexe. C’est une expérience menée en Chine à l’initiative de Baidu, moteur de recherche
chinois et KFC, célèbre chaîne américaine spécialisée dans le poulet.
Les deux partenaires viennent d’ouvrir un restaurant « intelligent » à Pékin où les
automates sont équipés d’une technologie de reconnaissance faciale. Cette dernière a
été développée par Baidu et se propose de déterminer l’âge et le sexe, ainsi que l’humeur
de la personne. En fonction de ces éléments, l’automate peut alors suggérer des menus
qui plaisent à cette population. Ainsi, un jeune homme de 20 ans sera plus enclin à
manger « un hambuger avec du poulet croustillant, des ailes de poulet rôties et un coca
pour le déjeuner ». A une dame d’une cinquantaine d’années, il sera recommandé « un
porridge et du lait de soja pour le petit déjeuner », souligne un communiqué de presse
délivré par les deux protagonistes.
Ils rappellent qu’il ne s’agit que de suggestions et le consommateur est libre de refuser
ces recommandations. L’automate gardera en mémoire les choix du client (et
accessoirement la photo) et pourra adapter ses conseils lors d’une prochaine venue. Ce
n’est pas la première fois que Baidu et KFC collaborent sur le développement de
technologie au sein des restaurants de la chaîne américaine. Un restaurant basé à
Shanghai avait hébergé un robot capable de prendre les commandes en utilisant le
langage naturel. Petit à petit, l’automatisation et l’intelligence artificielle s’installent dans le
quotidien de la relation client.
IA : on ne joue plus… ou alors à se faire
peur
Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/ia-on-ne-joue-plus-faire-peur-165758.html
Début 2016, l’intelligence artificielle (IA) pouvait être encore perçue comme un champ
d’expérimentation. 12 mois plus tard, le domaine est devenu le théâtre d’une bataille
acharnée entre Google, IBM, Amazon et autres. Et soulève aussi des questions de société
très concrètes. Et très immédiates.
Spécial Bilan 2016. En début d’année 2016, l’IA était presque encore un jeu, un exercice
de laboratoire. En mars, AlphaGo, une intelligence artificielle développée par Google,
s’imposait par K.O. face au champion sud-coréen du jeu de Go, Lee Sedol. Dans la veine
de la participation de Watson au jeu télévisé Jeopardy, en 2011. Sauf que, à mesure que
2016 avançait, les grands industriels du secteur, les Apple, Google, IBM, Amazon, ont
cessé de voir l’IA comme un simple terrain de jeu, multipliant les investissements et les
rachats dans ce qu’ils présentent comme la prochaine grande révolution technologique.
De facto, l’alliance des algorithmes de Deep Learning, forme d’apprentissage
automatique apparue à la fin des années 80, de grands volumes de données et de
capacités de calcul confortables (comme celles fournies par les GPU) a débouché sur des
percées majeures dans des domaines comme la reconnaissance vocale, la
reconnaissance d’images, la vision par ordinateur ou encore le traitement automatisé du
langage. Remodelant les offres des grands industriels du secteur. En quelques mois
seulement. Symbole de ce soudain emballement, le Français Yann LeCun, un des
chercheurs les plus influents du domaine, devenu, en quelques mois, une star planétaire.
LeCun a été embauché par Facebook, qui l’a placé à la tête de sa recherche en IA.
IA sous forme d’API dans le Cloud
Arrivé très tôt sur le segment, IBM est désormais rejoint par tous les grands noms du
secteur. Microsoft, Google et Apple proposent tous un assistant qu’on interroge par la
voix et qui est basé sur le Machine Learning. Ces technologies s’appellent
respectivement Cortana, Assistant et Siri. Mais les acteurs du Cloud vont plus loin. Le
premier éditeur mondial met ainsi à disposition des entreprises, sur Azure, des API
permettant de bâtir, de connecter à d’autres services et de réutiliser des robots
conversationnels. De passage à Paris cet automne, le patron de Microsoft, Satya Nadella,
expliquait : « Une des caractéristiques communes des applications que vous allez
construire sur Azure, c’est l’utilisation conjointe de l’intelligence artificielle sur de grands
volumes de données. » Les concurrents de Microsoft sur le Cloud, AWS et Google,
proposent évidemment des services similaires, accessibles sous la forme d’API.
Signalons également qu’en septembre, Redmond a annoncé la création d’une division
dédiée à l’IA. Pas moins de 5 000 scientifiques et ingénieurs seront chargés de réfléchir au
sujet. De son côté, Salesforce vient de mettre sur le marché une plate-forme d’IA baptisée
Einstein, construite à coups de rachats et venant se greffer sur l’ensemble de ses services
Cloud.
La voiture autonome peut-elle tuer son propriétaire ?
Couplées aux progrès de l’apprentissage non supervisé (où la machine découvre seule
des concepts), ces percées ont toutefois rapidement soulevé des questions éthiques,
voire philosophiques. Bien plus tôt que ce qu’on pouvait anticiper. Rappelons que les
premiers vrais débats publics sur le sujet remontent à une lettre ouverte publiée à
l’initiative de l’homme d’affaires Elon Musk et du physicien Stephen Hawking… en juillet
2015. Voici seulement 18 mois.
Or, des questions très concrètes sont déjà là, à nos portes. Comme le montre une récente
étude sur le dilemme dans lequel sont plongés les programmeurs des algorithmes
équipant les voitures autonomes. Si le véhicule est confronté à la traversée soudaine de
piétons qu’il ne peut éviter, que doit-il faire ? Terminer sa course dans un mur, au risque
de tuer ses passagers, ou heurter les piétons pour épargner la vie des personnes placées
à l’intérieur de la voiture ? La réponse à cette question a aussi des implications
commerciales : les consommateurs seront-ils prêts à acheter une machine programmée
pour les sacrifier en cas d’absolue nécessité ?
Un conflit provoqué par l’IA
Autre cas troublant : cette étude publiée en octobre par Google, qui montre que,
programmées pour protéger la confidentialité de communications, deux IA peuvent
« découvrir des formes de chiffrement et déchiffrement, sans qu’on leur ait enseigné des
algorithmes spécifiques pour ce faire », selon les termes des chercheurs. Autrement dit,
des formes de communication ignorées des concepteurs des algorithmes. Le constat est
d’ailleurs identique avec le système de traduction automatique du même Google, qui
intègre désormais des algorithmes de Deep Learning. Une autre étude montre que ce
système est capable d’établir des connexions entre des concepts et des mots qui ne sont
pas formellement liés. Pour les chercheurs, la conséquence de ce constat est claire : le
système a développé son propre langage interne, une « interlingua ». « Les réseaux
neuronaux sont complexes et les interactions difficiles à décrire », avouent humblement
les trois spécialistes de Google à l’origine de cette publication.
Début 2017, trois chercheurs français (Thierry Berthier, chaire de cyberdéfense de Saint-
Cyr à l’université de Limoges, Jean-Gabriel Ganascia, UPMC–LIP6, et Olivier Kempf,
IRIS), publieront une étude dévoilant un scénario concret de dérive malveillante de l’IA. En
l’occurrence un conflit impliquant l’OTAN et d’autres grands acteurs. Selon les
chercheurs, cette construction ne fait intervenir que des capacités ou fonctionnalités de
l’IA, « existantes ou en cours de développement, notamment dans les récents
programmes initiés par la Darpa », l’agence américaine pour les projets de recherche
avancée de défense.
Fait notable, Google, IBM, Facebook et consorts ne nient pas ou plus ces questions
éthiques. D’autant que celles-ci pourraient à terme engendrer une réaction de la société.
Début décembre, le réseau social a mis en ligne sur Facebook Code une série de six
vidéos informatives (en anglais) pour sensibiliser ses utilisateurs au fonctionnement de
l’intelligence artificielle. « L’IA est une science rigoureuse axée sur la conception de
machines et systèmes intelligents, utilisant des techniques algorithmiques inspirées par ce
que nous savons sur le cerveau », soulignent dans un billet de blog Yann LeCun et
Joaquin Quiñonero Candela, directeur de l’apprentissage automatique appliqué chez
Facebook.
Sortir des imprécations, dit Google
De son côté, Elon Musk, le patron de Tesla et SpaceX, a mis sur pied, fin décembre 2015,
OpenAI, une association à but non lucratif visant à réfléchir aux questions de société que
pose l’IA. L’organisme compte dans ses rangs des personnalités comme Peter Thiel (le
seul milliardaire de la tech à s’être affiché comme un soutien de Donald Trump), Reid
Hoffman (LinkedIn), mais aussi une société comme AWS, le leader mondial du Iaas.
La volonté des géants de l’IT avec ces initiatives ? Sortir des imprécations entre idolâtres
et détracteurs de l’IA, pour entrer dans le concret. « Alors que les risques potentiels de
l’IA ont reçu une large attention de la part du public, les discussions autour de ce sujet
sont restées très théoriques et basées sur des spéculations », estime Chris Olah, l’un des
auteurs de ‘Concrete Problems in AI Safety’, un travail de recherche publié par Google. Et
Mountain View de militer pour le développement « d’approches pratiques d’ingénierie de
systèmes d’IA opérant de façon sûre et fiable ».
Car, il ne s’agit pas de venir tuer dans l’œuf une révolution qui promet une large refonte
des applications d’entreprise. Lors de son symposium annuel en octobre, le cabinet
d’études Gartner prédisait que 50 % des applications analytiques embarqueront des
fonctions d’IA d’ici trois à cinq ans et qu’une large part des analyses sortant de ces
applications sera glanée via des interactions vocales.
Les bots pas encore à la hauteur
Si le patron d’IBM France, Nicolas Sekkaki, assure que sa société est aujourd’hui
engagée dans une dizaine de projets faisant appel à Watson, les vrais retours
d’expérience sur le sujet restent peu nombreux. Dans l’Hexagone, le Crédit Mutuel teste
l’utilisation de l’intelligence artificielle et des technologies cognitives depuis juin 2015.
Avec un go définitif sur l’intégration de la technologie dans les derniers jours de
décembre 2015. Pour l’heure, Watson est appliqué à deux cas d’usages au sein de
l’établissement : l’assistance des conseillers dans le traitement des e-mails d’une part, et
sur les produits d’assurance et d’épargne d’autre part. Une assistance informatisée qui
vise à optimiser la productivité du conseiller et améliorer la pertinence des réponses
fournies aux clients finaux. Pour l’instant, il ne s’agit pas de laisser l’IA interagir
directement avec le client. Le cabinet d’études Forrester estime, d’ailleurs, que les bots –
ces robots conversationnels basés sur l’IA – ne sont pas encore à la hauteur des attentes
des usagers.
Lors d’un séminaire sur le sujet organisé par le Cigref, Françoise Mercadal-Delassales,
directrice des ressources et de l’innovation à la Société Générale, rappelait toutefois que
l’IA n’a pas attendu ces derniers mois pour faire son apparition dans les métiers de
services. « Les banques utilisent depuis plusieurs années des machines pour traiter
l’information à des fins de scoring et de trading. Ce qui change depuis quelques années,
c’est la façon dont nous nourrissons ces machines avec le Big Data, les datalake et tout
cela dans un environnement informatique qui est basé sur le Cloud et les API », expliquait
la dirigeante.
Interview d’Obama, silence en France
Si banquiers et assureurs, notamment, manient le sujet avec précaution, c’est que ses
conséquences en termes d’emploi sont potentiellement explosives. Selon une étude
américaine (« Where machines could replace humans ») du cabinet McKinsey, les
technologies disponibles aujourd’hui « pourraient automatiser 45 % des activités que les
travailleurs effectuent en contrepartie d’une rémunération »aux Etats-Unis. Ce taux
attendrait même 54 % dans l’Union européenne, d’après le groupe de réflexion
économique européen Bruegel.
En la matière, tous les métiers ne sont pas logés à la même enseigne, certains étant
faiblement automatisables, d’autres plus fortement. En la matière, l’informatique semble
plutôt en première ligne. Une étude de société d’études américaine Evans Data
Corporation montrait, au printemps dernier, que 29 % des 550 développeurs de logiciels
interrogés craignent d’être supplantés par l’intelligence artificielle, des boîtes noires auto-
apprenantes qui remplaceraient les applications traditionnelles. Des perspectives qui
valent aussi pour la production informatique, comme le laissait entendre une étude
présentée à la conférence Usenix, début novembre.
Aux Etats-Unis, les débats de société que soulève l’IA ont poussé Barack Obama, le
président sortant, à accorder une longue interview à Wired sur le sujet, le 12 octobre
dernier. En France, à ce jour, aucun candidat à la présidentielle ou à la primaire ne s’est
encore exprimé clairement sur ces enjeux.

Contenu connexe

Similaire à Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/01/2017

Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017Romain Bochet
 
Tribune Utocat - Blockchain et Écologie
Tribune Utocat - Blockchain et ÉcologieTribune Utocat - Blockchain et Écologie
Tribune Utocat - Blockchain et ÉcologiePatrice BERNARD
 
Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo,
Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo, Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo,
Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo, PARIS
 
Economie Numérique : durable ou jetable ? - Green Mêlée
Economie Numérique : durable ou jetable ?    - Green MêléeEconomie Numérique : durable ou jetable ?    - Green Mêlée
Economie Numérique : durable ou jetable ? - Green MêléeLaurent Ruel
 
Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013
Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013
Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013KAMITIS
 
L’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseaux
L’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseauxL’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseaux
L’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseauxLIEGE CREATIVE
 
Ces inventions qui vont cartonner
Ces inventions qui vont cartonnerCes inventions qui vont cartonner
Ces inventions qui vont cartonnerhd-aafm1
 
Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...
Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...
Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...Joëlle Leconte
 
Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016
Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016
Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016Romain Bochet
 
What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015
What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015
What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015onepoint x weave
 
Le parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclage
Le parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclageLe parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclage
Le parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclageLIEGE CREATIVE
 
Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?
Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?
Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?La Fabrique de l'industrie
 
Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017
Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017
Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017Cluster TWEED
 
Introduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïque
Introduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïqueIntroduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïque
Introduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïqueMarianneSalama
 

Similaire à Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/01/2017 (20)

Valise a energie propre 2010
Valise a energie propre 2010Valise a energie propre 2010
Valise a energie propre 2010
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 08/01/2017
 
Tribune Utocat - Blockchain et Écologie
Tribune Utocat - Blockchain et ÉcologieTribune Utocat - Blockchain et Écologie
Tribune Utocat - Blockchain et Écologie
 
Infose Février 2017 N°120
Infose Février 2017 N°120Infose Février 2017 N°120
Infose Février 2017 N°120
 
14
1414
14
 
Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo,
Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo, Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo,
Les nouvelles énergies s’exposent à Tokyo,
 
Economie Numérique : durable ou jetable ? - Green Mêlée
Economie Numérique : durable ou jetable ?    - Green MêléeEconomie Numérique : durable ou jetable ?    - Green Mêlée
Economie Numérique : durable ou jetable ? - Green Mêlée
 
Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013
Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013
Hydrogène - publication kamitis juillet 2013
 
L’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseaux
L’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseauxL’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseaux
L’électrification de notre quotidien et son impact sur les réseaux
 
Ces inventions qui vont cartonner
Ces inventions qui vont cartonnerCes inventions qui vont cartonner
Ces inventions qui vont cartonner
 
La lettre du climat n°08
La lettre du climat n°08La lettre du climat n°08
La lettre du climat n°08
 
Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...
Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...
Nous avons suffisamment de minéraux pour assurer la transition énergétique - ...
 
Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016
Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016
Revue de presse IOT/ data du 03/12/2016
 
150 infose fev2020
150 infose fev2020150 infose fev2020
150 infose fev2020
 
What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015
What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015
What'sHOT ?! - Décembre 2015
 
Le parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclage
Le parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclageLe parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclage
Le parcours d’une batterie lithium-ion en fin de vie, les défis du recyclage
 
Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?
Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?
Comment décarboner le transport routier en France ?
 
Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017
Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017
Digital Energy - Blockchains | Gembloux - 16 novembre 2017
 
Introduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïque
Introduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïqueIntroduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïque
Introduction à l'énergie solaire photovoltaïque
 

Plus de Romain Bochet

Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Romain Bochet
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016Romain Bochet
 
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing SystemsUsage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing SystemsRomain Bochet
 

Plus de Romain Bochet (15)

Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
 
Big data
Big dataBig data
Big data
 
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing SystemsUsage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
 

Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/01/2017

  • 1. Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/01/2017 Bonjour, Voici la revue de presse IoT/data/energie du 1 janvier 2017. Je suis preneur d'autres artices / sources ! Bonne lecture et bonne année ! Romain Table des matières 1. What’s The Advantage Of Tesla’s 1.3 Billion Miles Of Data? Bloomberg Says… 2. Diamond Batteries Could Use Nuclear Waste to Generate Electricity for Millennia 3. The 5 IoT products a smart city needs in 2017 4. Will IoT actually keep us coal-dependent? 5. Joseph Desmond: “Instead of using fossil fuels to create the steam, BrightSource uses the sun.” 6. Baidu et KFC proposent des menus à la tête du client 7. IA : on ne joue plus… ou alors à se faire peur What’s The Advantage Of Tesla’s 1.3 Billion Miles Of Data? Bloomberg Says… Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/31/whats-advantage-teslas-1-3-billion- miles-data-bloomberg-says/ December 31st, 2016 by James Ayre Tesla has reportedly now gathered more than 1.3 billion miles of data from Autopilot- equipped vehicles, data that’s been obtained whether Autopilot was being actively used or not. What’s the value of all of this data? Does it give the company a significant advantage in the self-driving sector over its potential competitors?
  • 2. That line of thought is something we covered previously when comparing Tesla’s self- driving approach with Google’s, but it was explored in a recent article from Bloomberg as well that seems worth discussing here. There are some interesting quotes from various sources that know the topic well. Here are the parts in question that I’m referring to: “Of course, not all miles are created equal: there are semi-autonomous as well as fully self-driving ones, real-world vs simulated, highway vs those racked up in tricky urban environments. Still, Tesla is ‘in a very unique position to push the state of the art of algorithmic driving and machine learning in personal transport,’ said Adam Jonas, the lead analyst at Morgan Stanley for autos and shared mobility, in a recent note to clients. … “’Whether they are ahead or not, Tesla certainly has tons of data,’ said Richard Wallace, director of transportation systems analysis at the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ‘They will be able to analyze that six ways from Sunday and continue to tweak their algorithms.’ … “’Most car companies and tech companies don’t want to give away how far along they are. Elon, of course, is the exception — he’s always out there claiming how far ahead of everyone else he is,’ stated Karl Brauer, executive publisher for Kelley Blue Book. As companies boost their intelligence gathering, ‘the level of data that will be generated is on a scale that is hard for us to conceive. This is the tip of the iceberg.'” Nothing necessarily “new” in those comments, but still worth covering. To my eyes, Tesla holds a significant advantage already because of its approach, but, more importantly, the advantage will widen to a substantial degree with the launch of the Model 3 late next year (late 2017). With 500,000 Model 3s hitting the road in just a year or so, all loaded with a hardware suite allowing for fully autonomous driving, all silently gathering data to be used for the refinement of the company’s software, the company really shouldn’t have too
  • 3. much trouble outclassing its competition. Diamond Batteries Could Use Nuclear Waste to Generate Electricity for Millennia Source URL: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/news/diamond-batteries-could-use- nuclear-waste-to-generate-electricity-for-mille/ Nuclear waste takes thousands of years to decay. But that long-lived radioactivity could be exactly what makes these nuclear waste diamond batteries last for millennia. Researchers at the University of Bristol have used graphite, the waste product of nuclear reactors, to develop a man-made diamond which produces electricity when placed in close proximity to a radioactive source. Although these batteries produce only a small amount of current, they offer an incredibly long battery life of thousands of years. Making Use of Nuclear Waste Nuclear reactors need graphite blocks to control heat flow and nuclear reactions. When exposed to radioactive uranium rods, the graphite blocks gradually become radioactive, as well. When a nuclear plant gets decommissioned, graphite blocks are one of the main radioactive waste products which need to be handled. Carbon-14 is the radioactive version of carbon which is found at the surface of graphite blocks. The radiation of this carbon isotope cannot penetrate even a few centimeters of air, but it is not still safe to allow into the environment. The UK currently has almost 95,000 tonnes of radioactive graphite blocks. Researchers believe that, by extracting carbon-14, the majority of the graphite’s radioactive material can be removed. As a result, the cost and danger of storing graphite would be significantly reduced. Researchers have found a method to reuse these graphite blocks to generate electricity out of the radioactive waste. First,theyheat the graphite blocks and turn them into a gas. Then, the radioactive gas is compressed to grow a diamond. The beta particles emitted by the radioactive material interact with the crystal lattice and throw off electrons. The result? A radioactive diamond that can generate electricity for thousands of years. To prove the feasibility of the technique, the research team has designed a prototype nuclear battery using a nickel isotope, nickel-63, as the radioactive source. However, they are planning to use carbon-14 in their future designs. No Emissions, No Maintenance!
  • 4. Unlike many conventional methods of producing electricity which rely on moving a magnet inside a coil of wires, the nuclear-powered batteries have no moving parts and the electricity is generated by simply placing the man-made diamond in close proximity to a radioactive source. To shield the radioactive diamonds and make them safe to handle, a non-radioactive diamond coating is also grown. Dr. Neil Fox from Bristol's School of Chemistry explains that these nuclear batteries have no radioactive threats to the user. He notes that carbon- 14 has short-range radiation which can be completely confined within the world’s hardest material: diamond. This non-radioactive diamond coating means that someone in close proximity to a nuclear battery would receive as much radiation as they would sitting next to a banana! According to Professor Tom Scott of the university's Interface Analysis Centre, the nuclear batteries not only have negligible emissions but they also do not require any maintenance. This fact alone means that nuclear diamonds could be used in areas that are dangerous— or downright impossible—for maintenance workers to reach. Potential Applications of a Diamond Battery The bad news is that the produced current is not high enough to power a smartphone. However, the long battery life makes the technology appealing especially for applications where it is not easy or even possible to recharge the battery or replace it with a new one. The longevity of these batteries, which is connected to the half-life of the nuclear waste's radiation, can be crucially important in applications such as designing pacemakers, satellites, spacecraft, and high-altitude drones. Researchers estimate that nuclear batteries based on carbon-14 will generate above 50% of their maximum power for as long as 5,730 years –– equal to the whole time the human civilization has existed. Hence, with this technology, it would be possible to power interstellar probes long after they lose solar power. Lithium-Ion, Nuclear Battery, or Another Alternative? Unfortunately, over the last few years, the battery industry has been cruel to many promising solutions. Researchers in this field need not only to solve many technical problems but also take the technology into the commercial realm. This is not at all easy because even a small battery manufacturer needs to invest nearly $500 million. In fact, according to MIT's Technology Review, one of the main reasons that new battery technologies do not get commercialized is the lack of funding and focus. Many manufacturers prefer to rely on the incremental improvement of lithium-ion batteries —which has been exceedingly slow, despite some recent, promising research into increased Li-ion capacity—rather than accept the initial huge investment of a new battery which would offer a dramatic improvement over conventional batteries. In October 2015, Lux Research published a report which predicted the lithium-ion battery as the main choice of energy storage for the years ahead. The nuclear-powered batteries can simultaneously solve a few of today’s serious problems such as nuclear waste disposal, clean electricity generation, and battery life. However, is there a clear path to seeing this technology commercialized? We face some
  • 5. serious questions: Is it economical to convert nuclear wastes into diamond batteries? Or are there only some particular applications that these batteries really lend themselves to? The details of this technology were discussed at the Cabot Institute's sold​out annual lecture––"Ideas to change the world"–– in November. The 5 IoT products a smart city needs in 2017 Source URL: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/the-5-iot-products-a-smart-city- needs-in-2017/ Connected IoT devices are part of the key elements of a smart city. Here are some of the most interesting and useful products for smart cities in 2017. Public safety and public services are key elements of a smart city. Whether a city is seeking smarter streetlights, more efficient waste removal, or gunshot detection, there are smart city products that stand out more than others. Here are some of the best and most useful devices that were used in smart cities around the world in 2016 and that will be vital in 2017. 1. Bigbelly Bigbelly is a smart waste and recycling system that has been deployed in all 50 US states and in 50 countries. It provides a solar-powered compacting waste bin that allows for up to five times the amount of waste as in a traditional bin, and it also alerts the appropriate city department when it needs to be emptied, according to Leila Dillon, vice president of marketing for Big Belly. This means that the number of trash bins in a city can be reduced by 70-80%, which makes the streets more aesthetically appealing, and it reduces the rodent population. Philadelphia, San Diego, Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago areamong the cities that use Bigbelly waste bins. 2. ShotSpotter XXXXx 3. Digital kiosks A digital kiosk gives information about restaurants, retail stores, and events in the immediate area. It also provides mapping for visitors, and can sync with a mobile phone to give additional data as needed.
  • 6. This is one of the 25 digital kiosks in place in Kansas City, Mo. Image: Kansas City
  • 7. In Kansas City, Mo., there are 25 digital kiosks installed within a 2.2-mile area as a living lab to test smart technology for the city. The city worked with Cisco to install the smart city tech and digital kiosks. 4. Smart streetlights Connected LED streetlights are the easiest way for a city to add smart tech. One benefit is reduced crime, because the lights automatically brighten when there are multiple people in the area, and dim when no one is around. Los Angeles has replaced old streetlights with smart versions. Image: City of Los Angeles The ROI is a no-brainer, with the LED lights saving more on energy costs within a few years than it costs to purchase and install them.In Los Angeles, the city saves nearly $9 million annually on utility costs as a result of its decision to spend $57 million to convert nearly 80% of its 215,000 old sodium-vapor streetlights to LED versions.
  • 8. 5. Parking sensors Imagine driving through a city, and accessing a mobile app that tells you when a parking spot is available. Parking sensors make this happen by sending a signal that indicates whether a parking spot is taken. European cities were early adopters of this technology. In Paris, France, the average resident spends four years of their life looking for a parking spot, according to Cisco. With widespread use of parking sensors, traffic in Paris has dropped dramatically. Kansas City is one of the first US cities to add parking sensors, but many other US cities are considering it, or testing it in small areas. Will IoT actually keep us coal-dependent? Source URL: http://readwrite.com/2016/07/11/internet-things-coal-power-pt4/ There are quite a few arguments for renewable energy investment, but one argument used against renewables was the cost factor. Five years ago, we started to see that cost gap close, leading countries like Germany, China, the United States to ramp up investment into solar farms. We may see a slow down on that investment, due to new Internet of Things (IoT) tools that lower the costs of running a coal plant and reduce the amount of emissions. GE, IBM, Siemens, and Schneider Electric have all launched digital power plant systems —for renewable, gas, and coal plants—that lower costs, emissions, and boost efficiency. The improvements, while helpful for the businesses and towns that stay open thanks to coal power, may also prolong our use of coal as the dominant power source. According toMIT Technology Review, an Italian plant shut down in 2014 due to excess electricity and reduced prices, but reopened in 2016 due to operation enhancements from GE’s hardware and software.1 The plant is now able to go from dormant to fully operational in two hours, down from three hours under the old system, which vice president of A2A Massimiliano Masi says is a huge improvement. Coal plants use IoT to gain efficiency On top of operational speed, GE’s system can improve energy efficiency from 33 to 49 percent. This means more electric power can be captured while burning the same amount of coal, leading to a reduction in emissions. While this may lead to a cleaner, smarter coal power system, it also allows factory owners to keep the plant running for longer. That would leave us at the same position, in terms of emissions, as we are at currently. For environmentalists, the invasion of IoT into coal plants may be seen as a disaster, but plenty of towns rely heavily on the factories for jobs.
  • 9. In the U.S., coal power accounts for around 33 percent of electricity production, but it has been dropping for a few years as renewable energy and natural gas make gains. We don’t think the small gains from IoT will have a major impact here, but in China and India, it may prolong the dominance of coal power and inflate the co2 emissions for another generation. Joseph Desmond: “Instead of using fossil fuels to create the steam, BrightSource uses the sun.” Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/28/joseph-desmond-instead-using- fossil-fuels-create-steam-brightsource-uses-sun/ December 28th, 2016 by The Beam This week, Anne-Sophie Garrigou, journalist at The Beam, interviewed Joseph Desmond, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Government Affairs for BrightSource Energy, a company founded in 2006 which became a leader in solar thermal technology. By concentrating the sun’s energy, the company produces high-value steam for electric power, petroleum and process markets worldwide. We talked to Joseph Desmond about BrightSource Energy’s vision and aspiration to build a carbon-free future. The Beam: At BrightSource Energy, you have developed a solar thermal energy system. Can you explain to us what it means and how it works? Joseph Desmond: BrightSource Energy designs, develops and deploys solar thermal technology to produce high-value electricity and steam for power, petroleum and industrial-process markets worldwide. BrightSource combines breakthrough technology with world-class solar power plant design capabilities to generate clean energy reliably and responsibly. BrightSource’s solar thermal systems are designed to minimize impact on the environment and help customers reduce their dependence on fossil fuels. Our solar thermal energy systems generate power the same was as traditional power plants — by creating high temperature steam to turn a turbine. However, instead of using fossil fuels to create the steam, BrightSource uses the sun. At the heart of BrightSource’s proprietary solar thermal system is a state-of-the-art solar field design, optimization software and a control system that allow for the creation of high-temperature steam. Thousands of software-controlled mirrors track the sun in two dimensions and reflect the sunlight to a boiler that sits atop a tower. When the concentrated sunlight strikes the solar receiver, it heats water to create superheated steam. The steam is either piped from the boiler to a conventional steam turbine to produce electricity, where transmission lines will carry the power to homes and businesses, or the steam is used in industrial process applications such as thermal enhanced oil recovery (EOR).
  • 10. By integrating conventional power block components, such as turbines, with our proprietary technology and state-of-the-art solar field design, electric power plants using our systems can deliver cost-competitive, reliable and clean power when needed most. We can also integrate proven molten salt storage of hybridize with a fossil fuel, further increasing output and reliability, and significantly reducing energy costs. What does it take to realize carbon-free energy? There are many forms of renewable support structures available and what is effective for one country may not be as effective for another. The choices depend on the policy objectives of the government and the type of investment behavior the government wishes to incentivize. Additionally, development costs for the same technology can vary geographically, including by permitting jurisdiction and by applicable labour rates. Regardless of the support mechanism, however, it’s policy consistency and clarity that most effectively builds confidence and attracts capital. Baidu et KFC proposent des menus à la tête du client Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/baidu-et-kfc-proposent-des-menus-a-la-tete-du- client-165839.html En s’appuyant sur la reconnaissance faciale, un KFC en Chine propose des menus adaptés en fonction de l’âge, du sexe et de l’humeur du client. On savait que les automates prenaient le pouvoir dans les enseignes de restauration rapide. Ils vont en plus vous suggérer des menus en fonction de votre âge et de votre sexe. C’est une expérience menée en Chine à l’initiative de Baidu, moteur de recherche chinois et KFC, célèbre chaîne américaine spécialisée dans le poulet. Les deux partenaires viennent d’ouvrir un restaurant « intelligent » à Pékin où les automates sont équipés d’une technologie de reconnaissance faciale. Cette dernière a été développée par Baidu et se propose de déterminer l’âge et le sexe, ainsi que l’humeur de la personne. En fonction de ces éléments, l’automate peut alors suggérer des menus qui plaisent à cette population. Ainsi, un jeune homme de 20 ans sera plus enclin à manger « un hambuger avec du poulet croustillant, des ailes de poulet rôties et un coca pour le déjeuner ». A une dame d’une cinquantaine d’années, il sera recommandé « un porridge et du lait de soja pour le petit déjeuner », souligne un communiqué de presse délivré par les deux protagonistes. Ils rappellent qu’il ne s’agit que de suggestions et le consommateur est libre de refuser ces recommandations. L’automate gardera en mémoire les choix du client (et accessoirement la photo) et pourra adapter ses conseils lors d’une prochaine venue. Ce n’est pas la première fois que Baidu et KFC collaborent sur le développement de technologie au sein des restaurants de la chaîne américaine. Un restaurant basé à Shanghai avait hébergé un robot capable de prendre les commandes en utilisant le langage naturel. Petit à petit, l’automatisation et l’intelligence artificielle s’installent dans le
  • 11. quotidien de la relation client. IA : on ne joue plus… ou alors à se faire peur Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/ia-on-ne-joue-plus-faire-peur-165758.html Début 2016, l’intelligence artificielle (IA) pouvait être encore perçue comme un champ d’expérimentation. 12 mois plus tard, le domaine est devenu le théâtre d’une bataille acharnée entre Google, IBM, Amazon et autres. Et soulève aussi des questions de société très concrètes. Et très immédiates. Spécial Bilan 2016. En début d’année 2016, l’IA était presque encore un jeu, un exercice de laboratoire. En mars, AlphaGo, une intelligence artificielle développée par Google, s’imposait par K.O. face au champion sud-coréen du jeu de Go, Lee Sedol. Dans la veine de la participation de Watson au jeu télévisé Jeopardy, en 2011. Sauf que, à mesure que 2016 avançait, les grands industriels du secteur, les Apple, Google, IBM, Amazon, ont cessé de voir l’IA comme un simple terrain de jeu, multipliant les investissements et les rachats dans ce qu’ils présentent comme la prochaine grande révolution technologique. De facto, l’alliance des algorithmes de Deep Learning, forme d’apprentissage automatique apparue à la fin des années 80, de grands volumes de données et de capacités de calcul confortables (comme celles fournies par les GPU) a débouché sur des percées majeures dans des domaines comme la reconnaissance vocale, la reconnaissance d’images, la vision par ordinateur ou encore le traitement automatisé du langage. Remodelant les offres des grands industriels du secteur. En quelques mois seulement. Symbole de ce soudain emballement, le Français Yann LeCun, un des chercheurs les plus influents du domaine, devenu, en quelques mois, une star planétaire. LeCun a été embauché par Facebook, qui l’a placé à la tête de sa recherche en IA. IA sous forme d’API dans le Cloud Arrivé très tôt sur le segment, IBM est désormais rejoint par tous les grands noms du secteur. Microsoft, Google et Apple proposent tous un assistant qu’on interroge par la voix et qui est basé sur le Machine Learning. Ces technologies s’appellent respectivement Cortana, Assistant et Siri. Mais les acteurs du Cloud vont plus loin. Le premier éditeur mondial met ainsi à disposition des entreprises, sur Azure, des API permettant de bâtir, de connecter à d’autres services et de réutiliser des robots conversationnels. De passage à Paris cet automne, le patron de Microsoft, Satya Nadella, expliquait : « Une des caractéristiques communes des applications que vous allez construire sur Azure, c’est l’utilisation conjointe de l’intelligence artificielle sur de grands volumes de données. » Les concurrents de Microsoft sur le Cloud, AWS et Google, proposent évidemment des services similaires, accessibles sous la forme d’API. Signalons également qu’en septembre, Redmond a annoncé la création d’une division
  • 12. dédiée à l’IA. Pas moins de 5 000 scientifiques et ingénieurs seront chargés de réfléchir au sujet. De son côté, Salesforce vient de mettre sur le marché une plate-forme d’IA baptisée Einstein, construite à coups de rachats et venant se greffer sur l’ensemble de ses services Cloud. La voiture autonome peut-elle tuer son propriétaire ? Couplées aux progrès de l’apprentissage non supervisé (où la machine découvre seule des concepts), ces percées ont toutefois rapidement soulevé des questions éthiques, voire philosophiques. Bien plus tôt que ce qu’on pouvait anticiper. Rappelons que les premiers vrais débats publics sur le sujet remontent à une lettre ouverte publiée à l’initiative de l’homme d’affaires Elon Musk et du physicien Stephen Hawking… en juillet 2015. Voici seulement 18 mois. Or, des questions très concrètes sont déjà là, à nos portes. Comme le montre une récente étude sur le dilemme dans lequel sont plongés les programmeurs des algorithmes équipant les voitures autonomes. Si le véhicule est confronté à la traversée soudaine de piétons qu’il ne peut éviter, que doit-il faire ? Terminer sa course dans un mur, au risque de tuer ses passagers, ou heurter les piétons pour épargner la vie des personnes placées à l’intérieur de la voiture ? La réponse à cette question a aussi des implications commerciales : les consommateurs seront-ils prêts à acheter une machine programmée pour les sacrifier en cas d’absolue nécessité ? Un conflit provoqué par l’IA Autre cas troublant : cette étude publiée en octobre par Google, qui montre que, programmées pour protéger la confidentialité de communications, deux IA peuvent « découvrir des formes de chiffrement et déchiffrement, sans qu’on leur ait enseigné des algorithmes spécifiques pour ce faire », selon les termes des chercheurs. Autrement dit, des formes de communication ignorées des concepteurs des algorithmes. Le constat est d’ailleurs identique avec le système de traduction automatique du même Google, qui intègre désormais des algorithmes de Deep Learning. Une autre étude montre que ce système est capable d’établir des connexions entre des concepts et des mots qui ne sont pas formellement liés. Pour les chercheurs, la conséquence de ce constat est claire : le système a développé son propre langage interne, une « interlingua ». « Les réseaux neuronaux sont complexes et les interactions difficiles à décrire », avouent humblement les trois spécialistes de Google à l’origine de cette publication. Début 2017, trois chercheurs français (Thierry Berthier, chaire de cyberdéfense de Saint- Cyr à l’université de Limoges, Jean-Gabriel Ganascia, UPMC–LIP6, et Olivier Kempf, IRIS), publieront une étude dévoilant un scénario concret de dérive malveillante de l’IA. En l’occurrence un conflit impliquant l’OTAN et d’autres grands acteurs. Selon les chercheurs, cette construction ne fait intervenir que des capacités ou fonctionnalités de l’IA, « existantes ou en cours de développement, notamment dans les récents programmes initiés par la Darpa », l’agence américaine pour les projets de recherche avancée de défense. Fait notable, Google, IBM, Facebook et consorts ne nient pas ou plus ces questions éthiques. D’autant que celles-ci pourraient à terme engendrer une réaction de la société.
  • 13. Début décembre, le réseau social a mis en ligne sur Facebook Code une série de six vidéos informatives (en anglais) pour sensibiliser ses utilisateurs au fonctionnement de l’intelligence artificielle. « L’IA est une science rigoureuse axée sur la conception de machines et systèmes intelligents, utilisant des techniques algorithmiques inspirées par ce que nous savons sur le cerveau », soulignent dans un billet de blog Yann LeCun et Joaquin Quiñonero Candela, directeur de l’apprentissage automatique appliqué chez Facebook. Sortir des imprécations, dit Google De son côté, Elon Musk, le patron de Tesla et SpaceX, a mis sur pied, fin décembre 2015, OpenAI, une association à but non lucratif visant à réfléchir aux questions de société que pose l’IA. L’organisme compte dans ses rangs des personnalités comme Peter Thiel (le seul milliardaire de la tech à s’être affiché comme un soutien de Donald Trump), Reid Hoffman (LinkedIn), mais aussi une société comme AWS, le leader mondial du Iaas. La volonté des géants de l’IT avec ces initiatives ? Sortir des imprécations entre idolâtres et détracteurs de l’IA, pour entrer dans le concret. « Alors que les risques potentiels de l’IA ont reçu une large attention de la part du public, les discussions autour de ce sujet sont restées très théoriques et basées sur des spéculations », estime Chris Olah, l’un des auteurs de ‘Concrete Problems in AI Safety’, un travail de recherche publié par Google. Et Mountain View de militer pour le développement « d’approches pratiques d’ingénierie de systèmes d’IA opérant de façon sûre et fiable ». Car, il ne s’agit pas de venir tuer dans l’œuf une révolution qui promet une large refonte des applications d’entreprise. Lors de son symposium annuel en octobre, le cabinet d’études Gartner prédisait que 50 % des applications analytiques embarqueront des fonctions d’IA d’ici trois à cinq ans et qu’une large part des analyses sortant de ces applications sera glanée via des interactions vocales. Les bots pas encore à la hauteur Si le patron d’IBM France, Nicolas Sekkaki, assure que sa société est aujourd’hui engagée dans une dizaine de projets faisant appel à Watson, les vrais retours d’expérience sur le sujet restent peu nombreux. Dans l’Hexagone, le Crédit Mutuel teste l’utilisation de l’intelligence artificielle et des technologies cognitives depuis juin 2015. Avec un go définitif sur l’intégration de la technologie dans les derniers jours de décembre 2015. Pour l’heure, Watson est appliqué à deux cas d’usages au sein de l’établissement : l’assistance des conseillers dans le traitement des e-mails d’une part, et sur les produits d’assurance et d’épargne d’autre part. Une assistance informatisée qui vise à optimiser la productivité du conseiller et améliorer la pertinence des réponses fournies aux clients finaux. Pour l’instant, il ne s’agit pas de laisser l’IA interagir directement avec le client. Le cabinet d’études Forrester estime, d’ailleurs, que les bots – ces robots conversationnels basés sur l’IA – ne sont pas encore à la hauteur des attentes des usagers. Lors d’un séminaire sur le sujet organisé par le Cigref, Françoise Mercadal-Delassales, directrice des ressources et de l’innovation à la Société Générale, rappelait toutefois que l’IA n’a pas attendu ces derniers mois pour faire son apparition dans les métiers de services. « Les banques utilisent depuis plusieurs années des machines pour traiter
  • 14. l’information à des fins de scoring et de trading. Ce qui change depuis quelques années, c’est la façon dont nous nourrissons ces machines avec le Big Data, les datalake et tout cela dans un environnement informatique qui est basé sur le Cloud et les API », expliquait la dirigeante. Interview d’Obama, silence en France Si banquiers et assureurs, notamment, manient le sujet avec précaution, c’est que ses conséquences en termes d’emploi sont potentiellement explosives. Selon une étude américaine (« Where machines could replace humans ») du cabinet McKinsey, les technologies disponibles aujourd’hui « pourraient automatiser 45 % des activités que les travailleurs effectuent en contrepartie d’une rémunération »aux Etats-Unis. Ce taux attendrait même 54 % dans l’Union européenne, d’après le groupe de réflexion économique européen Bruegel. En la matière, tous les métiers ne sont pas logés à la même enseigne, certains étant faiblement automatisables, d’autres plus fortement. En la matière, l’informatique semble plutôt en première ligne. Une étude de société d’études américaine Evans Data Corporation montrait, au printemps dernier, que 29 % des 550 développeurs de logiciels interrogés craignent d’être supplantés par l’intelligence artificielle, des boîtes noires auto- apprenantes qui remplaceraient les applications traditionnelles. Des perspectives qui valent aussi pour la production informatique, comme le laissait entendre une étude présentée à la conférence Usenix, début novembre. Aux Etats-Unis, les débats de société que soulève l’IA ont poussé Barack Obama, le président sortant, à accorder une longue interview à Wired sur le sujet, le 12 octobre dernier. En France, à ce jour, aucun candidat à la présidentielle ou à la primaire ne s’est encore exprimé clairement sur ces enjeux.