SlideShare une entreprise Scribd logo
1  sur  21
Télécharger pour lire hors ligne
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 17/12/2016
Bonjour,
Voici la revue de presse IoT/data/energie du 17 décembre 2016.
Je suis preneur d'autres artices / sources !
Bonne lecture !
Table des matières
1. Could Disposable Printed Electronics Be the Future of Packaging?
2. Electric Motorcycle Doubles As Residential Storage Battery
3. Airbus, Michelin, Safran, Vallourec... : pourquoi les industriels foncent sur l’IoT
4. Home Energy Management Devices To Bring In Revenue Of $7.8 Billion In 2025,
Predicts Navigant
5. Le drone lampadaire chasse les zones d'ombre
6. Concevoir les objets connectés des autres, le nouveau métier de l'IoT
7. Will autonomous microgrids drive IoT in smart cities?
8. Autoconsommation photovoltaïque : le système de gestion MyLight amélioré grâce
à de nouveaux algorithmes - Les-SmartGrids.fr
9. The Year That Was (and Was Not) For The Internet Of Things
10. Energy Company Offers Free Charging for Electric Vehicles
11. Le robotique à la demande et l'IA, au top des prévisions d'IDC
Could Disposable Printed Electronics Be
the Future of Packaging?
Summary
Printed electronics is going to be the largest sector of electronics if it does not replace
standard electronic practices altogether. While the devices made by ThinFilm are very
simple, they clearly have advantages when it comes to mass production and the art of
integrating electronics into mundane objects, starting with the packaging that we throw
out every day.
Integrating electronics into everyday life isn't all smartphones and automated cars. Even
our disposable products, especially packaging, can become high tech. Silicon-free
printed electronics could give rise to tech that's designed to be thrown away.
Changing Product Design and Fabrication with Printed
Printed electronics have made the news multiple times in the past year. They offer the
electronics industry something that has only ever been available to semiconductor
manufacturers in the past: the ability to have a fully customized circuit with customized
components.
Currently, production of the typical circuit board goes something like this: First, the board
is designed and printed. When the PCB is ready to be populated, parts are ordered from
distributors which are then placed onto the PCB either by hand or by machine. Once the
parts are in place, the PCB (with components) is then sent to be placed into the final
product (unless the PCB, itself, is the final product).
If a design change is needed in this process, engineers may need to do some redesigning
(sometimes of the PCB overall), change the component list, and then change the entire
production line to account for this change. The time it takes to make changes can cost a
company both money and resources with typical PCB lead times being seven days.
These seven days translate to seven days of stalled production and consequently, seven
days of effectively no sales.
This is where printed electronics can really make a difference. Imagine a circuit has been
designed and needs to be prototyped. Instead of sending for the PCB to be fabricated
and then hand-constructing the unit, the printed design is sent to a 3D printer which
produces the functioning circuit (with all connections) in a matter of hours. The final
product, also made from printed electronics, takes only hours to produce with few
intermediate steps and non-reliance on distributors for parts. If a design change is
needed, it can be made easily by feeding the new designs to the fabricator where
immediate changes can be made to the new circuits made on the production line.
Printed electronics may have another potential use that silicon may never be able to
match: mass production in the trillions.
The Problem with Silicon
Silicon enables the creation of all manner of circuits ranging from power control to high-
end computer processing. For the past 50 years, silicon has been able to fulfill industry
demand by providing better devices every year. While semiconductor device power is
slowly approaching its limit, there is one aspect of semiconductor devices that the
industry has not thought of. Currently, some 20 billion microcontrollers are produced
which is more than enough for applications such as computing, IoT devices, and other
devices. However, if electronics are to be integrated into all products, including packaging
for commercial items in shops, then 20 billion devices just won't cut it.
So how can printed electronics help here?
Electronics needed for all packaging (including a box of six eggs) do not need to be overly
advanced with peripherals such as USB, TCP stacks, or even GPIO. In order to make
everyday packaging high tech, such devices would only need a very basic processor
connected to a near field communication link, so that functions such as security scanning
and product information could be implemented. This is exactly what ThinFilm (a
Norwegian Company) is planning to do.
Tiny, Printable, Disposable Processors
Currently, ThinFilm specializes in printed electronics in the form of smart labels for
perishable products (such as food), non-volatile printed memory, and near field
communication.
To meet the expected demand for the integration of electronics, the company purchased
a manufacturing facility in Silicon Valley which it will retrofit to produce some five billion
printed devices that are estimated to have a value of $680 million.
What makes these devices “mass production friendly” is that they are fabricated on a
flexible substrate that can be reeled like paper. So not only are these devices easier to
produce than semiconductors, they are both flexible and easily stored. The fact that these
devices can be stored on rolls make them ideal for the packaging industry which uses
paper and cardboard on near identical rolls. Therefore, these devices could be, in theory,
loaded into similar machinery and then stamped onto the required packaging (effectively
integrating multiple stages into one continuous operation).
Their non-volatile printed memory technology has already been purchased by Xerox who
already has production-scale manufacturing taking place in Webster, NY.
Printed rolls of memory. Image courtesy of ThinFilm
However, this is not enough for ThinFilm, and they are currently working towards a more
radical plan: to have an entire processor printed on their substrate (though it would be a
simplistic processor). The current goal is to integrate several thousand logic gates in the
hope of creating a device that has the computational power of the Intel 4004 (which had
2,400 gates).
Their near field communication device has 1500 gates, whereas their temperature sensor
has 2,000 gates. This means that (in theory), they are only 400 gates shy of a 4004
processor. While many may believe that a device as simple as a 4004 is no longer relevant
in the world, creating one on this substrate would actually be an extremely relevant
accomplishment. A label armed with a 4-bit processor and some non-volatile memory
could suddenly be used to process data such as item ID changes, date changes, sensor
processing, and much more.
The use of such simple processors in product packaging (along with near field
communication, found in many smartphones) can open customers and distributors to a
whole new world. For example, the printed labels could be scanned by a smartphone and
return information, including the authenticity of the product, potential allergy warnings,
and manufacturing details.
Electric Motorcycle Doubles As
Residential Storage Battery
Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/16/electric-motorcycle-doubles-
residential-storage-battery/
December 16th, 2016 by Steve Hanley
They say there is nothing new under the sun, but the Jahammer J1 electric motorcycle
comes about as close as you can get. Johann Hammerschmid, founder of Johammer E-
mobility Inc, says of his oddly styled creation, “This is a natural return to the concept of
the horse, before there was noise and pollution from engines.” Some have compared its
looks to a giant peanut or a horse used for jousting in the Middle Ages, but it also looks a
lot like a cross between a Cushman motor scooter from the 1950’s and a Quonset hut.
The bike features a 12 kWh battery that is good for up to 186 miles of range on the
highway — less in hilly terrain or off road use. That makes it the longest range electric
motorcycle on the market. Some 60 Johammer J1’s have been sold in Europe since 2014.
Hammerschmidt says he first started thinking about building the bike in 2017. His factory
is located in eastern Austria near the Czech border.
Two striking features of the bike are the corrugated polypropylene bodywork and the
center hub steering system. Hammershcmidt says it takes just a few miles aboard the J1
to get used to its handling characteristics. The J1 has no dashboard. Data displays are
included in each rear view mirror instead. Rotating the throttle away from the rider
engages regenerative braking. The more twist, the more the bike slows. There is also a
reverse gear to assist in parking. Wheels, brake discs and tires are purchased from
outside suppliers to make sure the bikes are road legal. Everything else is built and
assembled in house.
But that’s only half the story of the Johammer J1. With a battery only slightly smaller than
the latest Tesla Powerwall, it can be plugged in when riding is done and serve as a
storage battery for a home or small business. That makes it ideal for those who have a
residential solar panel installation. “A motorcycle like this is weather-dependent, so no
vehicle is better suited for a secondary role as storage,” Hammerschmidt says.
He is proud of the fact that his invention does not quite fit any conventional description. Is
it a storage battery on wheels or a motorcycle that is also a storage battery? “We’re at
the stage cars were at 100 years ago. The infrastructure was limited but it grew quickly,”
says Hammerschmid. “The same will happen with e-vehicles, and it won’t just be gas
stations used for recharging.” Homes, workplaces, shopping malls, parking garages—all
will become places to recharge. “The change of pace will be quicker than we currently
imagine,” he says.
The top of the line Johammer J1 is priced at around $27,000 and the company has begun
a crowdfunding campaign to help pay for an expansion of production.
Hammerschmidt says he is riding the early wave of multi-function green transport. “This
trend is irreversible, we are seeing it in all sectors and especially those connected with
mobility.”
He may be correct, but his creation still looks weird from every angle. Perhaps that is the
price of innovation.
Airbus, Michelin, Safran, Vallourec... :
pourquoi les industriels foncent sur l’IoT
Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/airbus-michelin-safran-vallourec-foncent-iot-
165186.html
Lors du salon Smart Industries, de grands industriels ont témoigné de leur intérêt pour
l’IoT. Qui, grâce à des réseaux comme Sigfox ou Lora, permet de dépasser les limites du
RFID. Et d’inventer de nouveaux usages.
En matière d’IoT, le temps des tests en laboratoire ou des prototypes apparaît bel et bien
révolu. Place aux déploiements à l’échelle industrielle. C’est en tout cas le constat qui se
dégage après le salon Smart Industries, qui se tenait la semaine dernière à Paris Nord
Villepinte. Certes, les déploiements en masse, comme ceux de Décathlon et ses 700
millions de tags RFID à l’année, sont encore l’exception, mais plusieurs facteurs se
combinent pour accélérer l’industrialisation.
A commencer, précisément, par les alternatives au RFID, alternatives ne nécessitant pas
l’installation d’infrastructures pour récolter les données (comme des portiques). C’est par
exemple ce qui a permis à Zimmer Biomet de proposer une traçabilité de ses implants
médicaux sur toute la chaîne logistique, y compris au sein des hôpitaux. « L’objectif de ce
projet est de s’assurer que les hôpitaux disposent de tous les éléments nécessaires au
moment de leur intervention », résume Raoul Barthez, le directeur opérationnel de cette
société américaine. Or, installer des portiques RFID chez l’ensemble des clients de la
société était inenvisageable. Zimmer Biomet travaille aujourd’hui avec quelques hôpitaux
et cliniques pilotes afin qu’ils intègrent les données recueillies à leurs logiciels internes.
Airbus mise sur un cocktail de réseaux
« Avec l’IoT, on étend le champ des possibles sur toute la chaîne de valeur en matière de
traçabilité, abonde Nicolas Monturet, architecte SI chez Airbus. Mais on peut aussi
amener de nouveaux usages, modifier l’expérience des passagers. » Reste, pour un
avionneur dont les produits parcourent le globe, à trouver une infrastructure de
communication disponible partout dans le monde, ce qui, à ce jour, est encore un peu
illusoire. « Il faut donc concevoir une architecture modulaire, car une seule technologie ne
répondra pas à tous les besoins », dit Nicolas Monturet. Airbus a fait le choix de déployer
une passerelle permettant de se connecter à différents réseaux.
Pour Jean-François Lecosse, directeur du CNRFID (centre national de référence sur la
RFID), l’arrivée de nouvelles infrastructures, comme les réseaux Lora ou Sigfox, permet
avant tout d’étendre le suivi des actifs, « un domaine où généralement, on a affaire à une
personne avec un tableau Excel, une personne sait que ce que les données de ce tableau
sont fausses et qu’elle va perdre environ 10 % des actifs suivis par an. » Avec le RFID, un
suivi plus fin était limité aux contenus de grande valeur, du fait du coût d’installation des
infrastructures. Des technologies comme Lora et Sigfox permettent de s’affranchir de
cette contrainte, donc d’amener un suivi automatisé y compris sur des biens de valeur
plus modeste.
Vallourec : des puces enfouies dans des tubes
On retrouve même des projets IoT dans des environnements où on ne les attend pas
forcément, comme chez Vallourec, fabricant de tubes en acier sans soudures et de
solutions tubulaires spécifiques. « Contrairement à ce qu’on imagine, ce sont des produits
de haute technicité. Tous les tubes sont marqués avec un code, le passage à l’IoT va
faciliter un accès plus systématique aux données relatives à la vie du produit et nous
permettre d’envisager de nouvelles optimisations », résume Renaud de Lapeyrière, le
directeur du développement du groupe. Même si, évidemment, les contraintes inhérentes
aux métiers de Vallourec, qui travaille beaucoup avec le secteur de l’énergie (gaz, pétrole),
rendent le projet complexe. « Il faut intégrer des puces au sein de produits soumis à des
contraintes élevées, sans entamer l’intégrité du produit et tout en garantissant la
résistance à la manutention », ajoute le responsable de Vallourec. Un domaine finalement
peu défriché où l’industriel a eu quelques surprises, dues notamment à l’environnement
métallique où est intégrée la puce et à son encapsulation qui crée des décalages de
fréquence. « Nous avons eu besoin de compétences externes. Probablement aussi parce
que nous n’en sommes qu’au premier projet de ce type. Dans 10 ans, le constat sera
peut-être différent », ajoute Renaud de Lapeyrière.
Tâtonner : un passage obligé pour Jean-François Lecosse. « Toutes les sociétés
industrielles doivent entrer ce monde-là, car y aller tôt, c’est comprendre les enjeux
colossaux qui y sont associés, quitte à essuyer quelques revers comme ce fut le cas avec
le RFID », assure-t-il. Enjeux de transformation des produits en service (comme on le voit
dans l’aéronautique où l’unité de compte devient l’heure de vol), enjeux de montée dans
la chaîne de valeur (comme ce concepteur de bacs plastiques pour médicaments qui, via
l’ajout d’un capteur de température, fournit un service de transfert de responsabilité à ses
clients) ou de collaboration à l’échelle d’une chaîne industrielle. « Moins vous avez
d’acteurs en amont et en aval, plus vous êtes capables de mettre rapidement en place
une solution apportant des gains partagés à toute la chaîne de valeur », résume Jean-
François Lecosse.
Safran : acquérir des données complémentaires
Photo : Kiefer, via VisualHunt.com, CC BY-SA
A condition de savoir comment exploiter pertinemment les données recueillies. Si les
technologies, notamment prédictives, sont là, le marché tâtonne encore en matière de
nouveaux usages. « Un A380, avion ultra-connecté, cumule 800 000 paramètres, soit
quelques Go de données par vol. Reste à savoir que faire de ces données, à développer
les cas d’usage structurants qui vont apporter de la valeur à l’entreprise », dit Emmanuel
Couturier, chef de programme innovation et business développement de Safran. Comme
certains équipements (trains d’atterrissage, moteurs…) sont désormais loués et non
achetés, l’industriel a besoin de mieux maîtriser le cycle de vie de ses produits pour se
conformer aux termes de ses contrats.« On va alors se rendre compte qu’il nous manque
certaines données ici ou là, précise Emmanuel Couturier. C’est là que l’IoT amène une
réelle révolution, car il va nous permettre d’acquérir des paramètres complémentaires,
grâce à des réseaux comme Lora ou Sigfox ». Safran mobilise une équipe de 20 à 40 data
scientists sur ces sujets. « C’est important de maîtriser ces technologies en interne »,
assure Emmanuel Couturier.
Les enjeux de maintenance prédictive sont également
au centre des réflexions de SKF, groupe suédois spécialiste des roulements à mécanique.
« Interpréter ce qui se passe sur le roulement, c’est comprendre ce qui se passe sur la
machine », veut croire Christophe Godel, le directeur de la BU Solutions & Services de
SKF France. Pour l’industriel, les dernières technologies d’IoT lui permettent aujourd’hui
d’intégrer la mesure au plus près du roulement proprement dit. « Nous avons commencé il
y a trois ans dans le domaine de l’éolien. Nous savons aujourd’hui prédire que telle panne
a tel risque de survenir sur telle marque d’éolienne », reprend le dirigeant. SKF espère
désormais démultiplier le procédé et le simplifier pour l’adapter à des composants plus
petits que ceux des éoliennes.
Michelin : les pneus connectés
Chez Michelin, l’IoT est avant tout vu comme un vecteur de services complémentaires.
« Nous avons démarré sur des usages particuliers, en l’occurrence la mesure de pression
et de température de pneus de camions exploités sur des installations minières, des
véhicules qui doivent fonctionner en permanence pour ne pas arrêter la production. Nous
avons donc vendu la remontée d’alertes comme un service supplémentaire. Aujourd’hui,
les prix des capteurs et de la technologie ont baissé et on peut imaginer généraliser ce
type de mesures à la voiture de Monsieur tout le monde. Reste à imaginer le service
pertinent pour ces utilisateurs », explique Olivier Coulomb, le directeur informatique
scientifique de la firme de Clermont-Ferrand.
Eric Payan, DSI et CDO de Bosch
La démarche est similaire chez Bosch : « La première finalité est d’apporter de nouveaux
services ou des services de meilleure qualité aux utilisateurs de nos produits finis
(réfrigérateurs, chaudières de marque elm Leblanc, etc. , NDLR), dit Eric Payan, le DSI et
Chief Digital Officer de Bosch. Mais recueillir des données permet aussi de mieux
connaître le cycle de vie de nos produits et d’entrer dans une démarche d’amélioration
continue. » Un pas de géant par rapport aux pratiques anciennes, comme le confirme
Olivier Coulomb de Michelin : « auparavant, notre connaissance était partielle ; les études
demandaient des mois et restaient imprécise. Il suffit désormais d’équiper quelques
centaines de camions pour récupérer une foule de données très précises ». Des
informations qui, associées à la connaissance du produit que détient Michelin, se révèlent
précieuses.
Home Energy Management Devices To
Bring In Revenue Of $7.8 Billion In 2025,
Predicts Navigant
Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/12/home-energy-management-
devices-bring-revenue-7-8-billion-2025-navigant/
Home Energy Management Devices To
Bring In Revenue Of $7.8 Billion In 2025,
Predicts Navigant
December 12th, 2016 by Joshua S Hill
The global market for home energy management devices such as smart thermostats is
growing, and expected to continue to grow, with a new report predicting global revenue
for the market to reach $7.8 billion in 2025.
Navigant Reserch published its findings in a new report this week, entitled Market Data:
Home Energy Management, in which it examines the global home energy management
market with a focus on four separate categories — home energy reports (HERs), digital
tools, standalone Home Energy Management (HEM), and networked HEM. Together,
these four categories comprise the current technologies currently allowing consumers to
better manage and control their energy consumption, as well as providing utilities and
non-energy services to better engage with their consumers.
The authors of the report predict global revenue in the HEM market to grow from almost
$2.3 billion this year, to $7.8 billion in 2025, a compound annual growth rate of 14.4%.
Unsurprisingly, Navigant predicts the North American market to represent the lion’s share
of the market, growing from $1.4 billion in 2016 to $3.1 billion in 2025. Europe and the
Asia Pacific will both reach 2025 with a $2.2 billion HEM market, while Latin America and
the Middle East & Africa are not expected to see much growth at all.
HEM Revenue by Region, World Markets: 2016-2025
The report also highlights several trends shaping the HEM market. In-home displays are
losing traction in the market, with a number of digital channels such as web-portals and
mobile applications making this particular market obsolete in North America — though
these technologies are still at play in several European regions, including the United
Kingdom.
Additionally, Navigant sees new players transitioning from the market from HEM to smart
homes. According to Navigant, utilities have taken a much less active part in the HEM
market, driving non-energy service providers to fill the gap. As a result, the HEM market is
transitioning from a focus on holistic energy management to energy management as part
of a smart-home solution, including other products such as home security, automation,
and entertainment.
“Non-traditional players have a claim on the HEM market with their existing in-home
offerings, and are driving a shift in the market from holistic HEM to energy management
as a component of the connected home,” says Paige Leuschner, research analyst with
Navigant Research. “Relatively flat electricity prices and the ability to offer HEM without
smart metering has caused utilities to take a passive role in this market in place of non-
energy service providers.”
Le drone lampadaire chasse les zones
d'ombre
Source URL: http://www.atelier.net/trends/articles/drone-lampadaire-chasse-zones-
ombre_444333
Par Quentin Delzanni 08 décembre 2016
​Si les lampadaires pullulent dans les villes, ils se font beaucoup plus discrets en
campagne, et ce notamment du fait des coûts, en énergie, matériel et entretien,
nécessaire à leur bon fonctionnement. Un projet testé à Petworth dans la campagne
britannique tente d’apporter une solution.
Londres, Barcelone ou Las Vegas sont actuellement en pleine recherche d’innovations
autour de leurs trottoirs, lampadaires et plus largement de la manière d’optimiser
l’éclairage public, le projet Fleetlights de Direct Line pourrait quant à lui intéresser les plus
petites communes et bourgs à travers le monde. Le point de départ de cette innovation
est un constat simple : plutôt que de mettre à disposition des points fixes de lumière, pas
souvent utiles dans ces lieux, pourquoi ne pas faire venir la lumière à la demande d’un
utilisateur, et ce pour la totalité de son trajet.
La flotte de drone équipée de projecteurs attend donc la nuit tombée pour s’activer et
trouver son utilité. À la manière d’un VTC, depuis une application de son portable, il suffit
de commander un drone sur sa position, pour que celui-ci rejoigne et accompagne
l’utilisateur lors de son trajet pédestre ou véhiculé. On retrouve un système de
fonctionnement similaire aux drones vidéos qui, piloté automatiquement grâce à la
connexion au smartphone de l’utilisateur, gravitent autour des sportifs afin de capturer
leurs exploits. C’est ici le même principe, la caméra étant « remplacée » par un projecteur.
Pour Fleetlights, une fois la destination atteinte, une simple commande dans l’application
renvoi le drone à son entrepôt de départ.
Créer pour sauver des vies sur les routes non éclairées et rassurer les personnes vivant
dans ces zones rurales parfois peu illuminées, le projet développé en open source semble
avoir un très grand nombre d’évolutions possibles. Notamment, on pourrait le retrouver
dans le domaine de la recherche et du sauvetage de personnes en péril en montagne par
exemple.
Concevoir les objets connectés des
autres, le nouveau métier de l'IoT
Source URL: http://www.journaldunet.com/ebusiness/internet-mobile/1189354-
conception-industrialisation-objets-connectes/
Mis à jour le 07/12/16 16:15
Rares sont les entreprises capables de fabriquer un appareil intelligent de A à Z. Pour les
aider, des sociétés de conseil d'un nouveau genre apparaissent.
Electronique, mécanique, télécommunication, vente… Les entreprises sont rarement des
couteaux suisses capables de trouver en interne l'ensemble des compétences
nécessaires à la production et à la commercialisation d'un objet connecté lorsque ce
n'est pas leur métier de base. "Pour parvenir au bout de leur projet, certaines contactent
un par un les spécialistes de chaque branche métier dont elles ont besoin. Cela leur
demande de jongler avec de multiples interlocuteurs et elles perdent du temps. D'autres
s'offrent les services d'un professionnel de la conception et de l'industrialisation des
objets connectés pour des tiers", explique Yanis Cottard, coprésident du groupe Altyor,
dont c'est le business.
Cette holding orléanaise est née en 2012 de la fusion des deux sous-traitants industriels
PDCI et Technochina (qui ont respectivement vu le jour en 1987 et 2000). Deux autres
filiales ont depuis été créées : le distributeur de produits high-tech et IoT Tiloli (2004) et le
fabricant d'appareils domotiques NodOn (2013). Chacune des branches qui composent
Altyor développe d'un côté son activité propre et met de l'autre son savoir-faire à
disposition de la holding. Cela permet au groupe de proposer un service de bout en bout
aux clients qui le désirent. Les autres peuvent n'avoir recours qu'à une partie de l'offre
Altyor. Ils passent de l'idée au produit industrialisé en neuf mois au lieu de 18 en
moyenne.
Altyor a réalisé 37 millions d'euros de chiffre d'affaires en 2015, dont 25%
sont liés à ses activités de conseil IoT
Le groupe se présente comme un précurseur du secteur du conseil IoT. "Nous aidons
depuis 8 ans les entreprises à concevoir leurs objets connectés, autant dire la Préhistoire
dans ce champ d'activité naissant", s'amuse le patron. Il y a deux ans, 100% des clients
d'Altyor étaient encore des start-up. "Aujourd'hui nous signons un tiers de nos contrats
avec de grands groupes", précise Yanis Cottard, qui ne souhaite pas révéler les noms de
ces entreprises. Cette activité de conseil IoT est déjà rentable pour Altyor, selon le
dirigeant. Le groupe réalisera en tout 37 millions d'euros de chiffre d'affaires en 2016,
dont 25% sont liés à ses activités de conception, de prototypage, de production et de
distribution d'objets connectés pour des tiers.
La start-up iSwip se focalise sur une partie moins large de la chaîne de valeur : elle aide
les entreprises à passer d'un projet IoT à un produit industrialisé mais ne gère pas la
distribution. Créée en 2011 et basée à Dagneux (Ain), cette jeune pousse a développé un
catalogue de 14 objets connectés génériques, dotés de fonctions de base qui peuvent
répondre à un maximum de besoins différents (capteurs de température, d'humidité,
trackers GPS…). Si la demande du client correspond, il lui suffit de passer commande et
d'apposer son logo sur l'appareil, commercialisé par iSwip en marque blanche.
Moyennant finance, la jeune pousse peut également ajouter certaines fonctionnalités à
ses objets connectés génériques, pour les adapter à un besoin plus spécifique. iSwip
propose aussi à ses clients de concevoir avec eux un appareil 100% sur-mesure.
"iSwip a été approchée à plusieurs reprises par des sociétés de conseil
classiques pour être rachetée"
Les entreprises qui optent pour un objet connecté sur catalogue reçoivent les produits
finis en huit à douze semaines en moyenne. S'ils choisissent le sur-mesure, ils doivent
compter six mois. "Mais nous ne mettons que trois semaines à concevoir un prototype. Si
jamais la première version ne convient pas, nos clients peuvent décider d'en réaliser un
autre.", souligne Emmanuel Torchy, CEO d'iSwip.
Neuf des clients de la pépite tricolore font partie du Cac 40. iSwip devrait réaliser
800 000 euros de chiffre d'affaires en 2016 et prévoit d'ici trois ans de passer à 3 millions.
"Aujourd'hui nous n'avons que quelques concurrents. Les entreprises de conseil
traditionnelles ne disposent pas en interne des compétences nécessaires pour nous faire
de l'ombre. Mais elles s'intéressent de près à ce marché : nous avons été approchés à
plusieurs reprises pour être rachetés mais nous avons décliné", glisse le PDG, pour qui le
secteur se consolidera dans les années à venir.
D'autres acteurs de ce marché neuf, comme la start-up Thingtype, se concentrent sur une
fraction encore plus étroite de la chaîne de valeur. "Nous aidons les entreprises à passer
d'une maquette pas très présentable, avec des branchements et des fils qui partent dans
tous les sens, à un prototype plus intégré, fonctionnant avec une carte électronique",
explique Armel Fourreau, le président de la jeune pousse parisienne, créée en avril 2016.
Un prototype qui pourra être présenté à de potentiels clients, testé sur le terrain, montré à
un investisseur…
Les algorithmes d'automatisation développés par Thingtype lui permettent
de ne facturer ses cartes électroniques que 200 euros pièce en moyenne
En général, les entreprises emploient des bureaux d'études qui leur facturent en moyenne
40 000 euros pour réaliser cette étape. Un ingénieur choisit une série de composants qui
correspondent aux différentes fonction de la maquette de départ. Il épluche une à une
leurs descriptions techniques afin de vérifier s'ils sont compatibles entre eux. Il travaille
ensuite sur le plan de la carte électronique sur laquelle seront fixés ces éléments. Une
étape très complexe. "Un simple capteur de température compte souvent plus de
60 composants. Les pattes de chacun de ces éléments ne doivent pas se croiser sinon
l'appareil ne fonctionne pas", détaille le dirigeant. Les ingénieurs mettent plusieurs
semaines à réaliser ce travail à la main.
"Nous avons développé un logiciel qui automatise ces taches à faible valeur ajoutée. Il ne
met que quelques secondes à réaliser ces opérations. Les entreprises ont leur carte
électronique en main au bout de seulement quatre semaines, contre quatre mois en
moyenne avec les bureaux d'études", affirme Armel Fourreau. Les clients de Thingtype ne
rencontrent jamais les salariés de la start-up : ils décrivent dans un formulaire en ligne les
différentes caractéristiques de leur maquette. Cette digitalisation des process permet à
l'entreprise de compresser au maximum ses coûts de production et de ne facturer ses
cartes électroniques que 200 euros pièce en moyenne.
Concevoir un objet connecté : 9 règles d'or pour faire aboutir son projet
Pour développer un appareil intelligent abouti, les entreprises doivent choisir le bon
réseau et opter pour une source d'énergie adaptée.
Will autonomous microgrids drive IoT in
smart cities?
Source URL: http://readwrite.com/2016/10/05/microgrids-will-boost-iot-adoption-
smart-cities-cl1/
Posted on October 5, 2016
The ability of microgrids to operate autonomously from larger grids could prove to be a
major driver of Internet of Things (IoT) adoption in smart cities of the future.
A recent Intel Grid Insights blog piece by Andres Carvallo1 discussed the pivotal role
microgrids will play in smart cities of the future. Carvallo is CEO of CMG, a consultancy
that advises on smart grids and other infrastructure.
Microgrids are small, local energy grids with control capability that allows them to be
disconnected from traditional utility grids. Carvallo says this capability to operate
independently will make microgrids a key driver for smart city adoption of IoT technology.
“Highly instrumented microgrids can strengthen grid resilience and help minimize outages
in the larger utility grid,” said Carvallo. “Microgrids are designed to enable two-way power
flow and two-way dataflow that require pervasive instrumentation and connectivity on just
about every device within it.”
See also:Can IoT turn back climate change?
Multiple technologies power microgrids, including natural gas CHP engines, fuel cells,
batteries, solar technology and diesel generators. And IoT will play a role with such
equipment that requires sensors, connectivity, analytics, machine learning optimization
and software for managing devices and energy.
Carvallo says that microgrids have grown to over 1.2 gigawatts (GW) in capacity, with
future projections reaching 20GW by 2020 and 100GW by 2030.
Microgrids provide greater reliability
Key reasons microgrids are being increasingly deployed in communities across the U.S.
are their high reliability, lower costs, reduced emissions and asset security. End users
include military bases, research labs, smart cities, universities, islands and other remote
communities.
With more than 100 players in the field today, he identifies several areas where IoT and
microgrids will provide opportunities in the future.
“Solutions that include things like control and energy management software, modeling
and feasibility analysis tools, building energy management systems, home energy
management systems, switching gear, protection gear, inverters, grid interconnectors,
batteries and energy storage, storage management systems, communications networks,
power meters, microprocessors, sensors, and gateways, to name a few,” he says.
Autoconsommation photovoltaïque : le
système de gestion MyLight amélioré
grâce à de nouveaux algorithmes - Les-
SmartGrids.fr
Source URL: http://www.les-smartgrids.fr/innovation-et-vie-
quotidienne/13122016,autoconsommation-photovoltaique-le-systeme-de-gestion-
mylight-ameliore-grace-a-de-nouveaux-algorithmes,1949.html
Rédigé par Vincent Gaillard | Le 13 décembre 2016 à 09:34
Les experts en mathématiques d’Eurodecision, société socialisé dansl'intelligence
artificielle et le big data, ont planché sur la solution d'autoconsommation
photovoltaïque e MyLight Systems afin d'y intégrer des algorithmes plus puissants
reposant sur le Machine Learning. Un travail qui a permis d'améliorer l'efficacité du
système, et surtout le rendre plus intelligent.
Du solaire sur-mesure
Ondine Suavet, co-fondatrice de MyLight Systems explique que le choix de faire appel à
Eurodécision a été motivé par le fait que MyLight n'utilisait jusque ici qu'une équation
mathématique, impossible, au final, d'adapter l'outil en fonction des besoins spécifiques
de chaque domicile. Mais cette première phase n'a pas été inutile, car le système dispose
désormais d'une base de données intéressante, permettant de faire des prévisions
beaucoup plus justes et donc de proposer du sur-mesure.
MyLight Systems est une solution permettant de relier des panneaux solaires à une
centrale de gestion regroupant thermostat, smart plugs et logiciel. Les utilisateurs
peuvent ainsi bénéficier d'une facture d'électricité réduite grâce à leur production
photovoltaïque.
Eurodecision a agi sur le système MyLight en enrichissant les trois algorithmes sur
lesquels était basé le processus. Le premier d'entre eux donne la possibilité d'avoir des
prévisions de production d'énergie en fonctions des données de l'habitation et de la
météo. Le deuxième va calculer au degré le plus fin possible les prévisions
deconsommationdu domicile auquel le système est relié et le troisième va planifier les
heures et durées de consommation des appareils électriques utilisés par les occupants,
de manière à réduire les dépenses énergétiques.
Le troisième algorithme se base sur les données chiffrées des deux précédents, en effet,
il additionne les prévisions de ressources à celles de consommation du domicile selon
l'appareillage utilisé par les occupants (l'électronique et le chauffage), ainsi que le
comportement de ces derniers.
Machine Learning
Le système fonction également selon le principe du Machine Learning, autrement dit, plus
il va être utilisé, plus celui-ci va apprendre de lui-même, en récoltant des données et en
les analysant afin d'exploiter le maximum de ses capacités selon l'environnement dans
lequel il est implanté.
Selon Ondine Suavet, MyLight Systems est très heureux d'avoir pu travailler avec les
mathématiciens de chez Eurodecision. Grâce à eux, MyLight Systems est désormais un
système extrêmement pointu technologiquement parlant.
The Year That Was (and Was Not) For The
Internet Of Things
Source URL: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/290734/the-year-that-was-
and-was-not-for-the-internet-o.html
As we prepare to say goodbye to another calendar year, much of the IoT-related
conversation has revolved around where the Internet of Things is projected to go in the
next year. This time last year, we heard a lot of predictions of where the coming year
would bring the IoT as it related to growth, security and adoption. Some came true fully,
some partially and some still need time to move from the planning stage to reality. So
before moving into 2017, here are those that still need some more time before being fully
realized:
Standards Would Emerge to Move the IoT Quickly Forward. The IoT saw
incredible growth in 2016, many of us presumed that we’d see much more
standardization than we actually did. Standardization in the IoT is important for a
number of reasons including helping to take the guesswork out of areas like
security, interoperability and are crucial for long term sustainability. The promise of
the Internet of Things is that everything will be connected and the key word there
iseverything. As such, no one wants to buy a product that only works with one or a
small handful of other connected products. They want their connected products to
be universal and to work with current products on the market, as well as with new
products being introduced. Standards will be necessary to make this happen and
to move the IoT to the mainstream.
More Clarity in the IoT Landscape. One of the biggest challenges plaguing the
IoT is the complexity of the current landscape. All suppliers that offer IoT solutions
today are combined in one singular, messy category. We did see significant
progress this year with specialties beginning to emerge and categories getting
more clearly defined. We see GE rising to the top in Industrial IoT and Amazon and
Microsoft creating tool kits of IoT pieces that can be used to develop a custom
solution. There is still work to be done to make all aspects of the IoT journey easier
though. Hardware, security, analytics and a standardized architecture have yet to
be fleshed out.
Successful Business Models Will Lead by Example. While there are a lot of
successful examples of IoT products, business models have varied widely from
company to company and across verticals. Today, we have yet to see one tried and
true, repeatable use case (better service, recurring revenue, product differentiation)
that companies can replicate and trust that their bet on the IoT will lead to success
and an improved bottom line. The sense of risk is getting lower every day, but being
able follow the successes of other companies who have paved the way lessens the
risk that much more.
Even though these particular predictions didn’t see full realization in 2016, the market is
moving in the right direction. One prediction we made for 2016 was that the IoT would
move from the exploration phase to the execution phase, and I think that one was spot
on. Thousands of companies have brought new connected products to market in 2016. It
was a year of great maturity and growth for the IoT, and it’s clear to me that 2017 will only
build on this momentum, taking another big step forward in the mission to build a smarter,
more connected future.
Energy Company Offers Free Charging
for Electric Vehicles
Source URL: http://www.smartgridobserver.com/n12-9-16-EV-charging.htm?
utm_source=12-9-16&utm_campaign=SGO++12-9-16&utm_medium=email
Clearview Energy, a leading residential supplier of 100% renewable energy, now offers
free home Electric Vehicle (EV) charging for all of its customers.
Transportation accounted for 34% of all carbon emissions in 2015. While transportation is
crucial to the economy and people's personal lives, as a sector it is also a significant
source of greenhouse gas emissions. Further, a fundamental change in consumer
purchasing and mobility behavior is crucial to any effort to reverse the global warming
epidemic. The average across 2017 model EV's is projected to be 114 Miles Per
Gallon(equivalent) MPG(e) in comparison to their non-EV counterparts at 40mpg.
"It's time to embrace electric vehicles as the future, and to enjoy the benefits of a more
stable, sustainable and less expensive mode of transportation," said Frank McGovern,
president of Clearview Energy. "We cannot leave the health of our planet and our
communities to chance. It's time to charge ahead, reduce our carbon footprint, and
protect our planet."
The partnership between Clearview Energy and ChargePoint, the world's largest EV
charging network, is available to residential electricity consumers in select markets across
the US. Under the new partnership, which is the first of its kind, EV owners with a
ChargePoint Home station will enjoy free vehicle charging. Charging costs are refunded to
the consumer in the form of a reimbursement.
Clear Charge 12EV or Clear Charge 24EV program and enrollment details can be found at
https://www.clearviewenergy.com
Le robotique à la demande et l'IA, au top
des prévisions d'IDC
Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/robotique-ia-top-previsions-idc-2017-164800.html
L’avènement de la robotique en tant que service, la promotion du chief robotics officer et
la pression réglementaire devraient marquer le secteur d’ici 2020, selon le cabinet IDC.
La robotique industrielle et de service est stimulée par les développements
technologiques dans l’intelligence artificielle (IA) et le Cloud. La tendance devrait se
poursuivre en 2017 et au-delà, selon les prévisions d’IDC. La robotique en tant que
service (RaaS) devrait également marquer le secteur.
D’ici 2019, 30 % des applications commerciales de robotique seront distribuées « à la
demande », selon IDC. Par ailleurs, les directeurs de la robotique (chief robotics officer)
vont être davantage demandés. 30 % des grands groupes devraient se doter de la
fonction dans les trois ans. Dans le même temps, la concurrence entre acteurs de la
robotique et la guerre des talents vont s’intensifier.
Bots, innovation et régulation
La société d’études table également sur une hausse du salaire moyen d’experts d’au
moins 60 % d’ici 2020. L’offre de compétences étant inférieure à la demande du marché.
Résultat : 35 % des emplois dans la robotique ne trouveraient pas preneurs… Outre les
difficultés de recrutements, de nouvelles contraintes réglementaires, spécifiques à la
robotique, devraient peser sur les entreprises du secteur. Les gouvernements souhaitant
à la fois tirer profit de la robotique et des applications d’intelligence artificielle, tout en
préservant l’emploi, la sécurité et la vie privée.
Enfin, IDC prévoit qu’un véritable marché Cloud de la robotique émerge. Des applications
et robots connectés, en réseau, intelligents, capables de collaborer. L’industrie et le e-
commerce sont loin d’être les seuls secteurs à se lancer. La logistique, la santé, les
services publics et d’autres expérimentent l’utilisation de robots de nouvelle génération
pour automatiser leurs opérations.

Contenu connexe

Similaire à Revue de presse IoT / Data du 17/12/2016

Les écrans souples liotard guilbault tourneux ei2
Les écrans souples   liotard guilbault tourneux ei2Les écrans souples   liotard guilbault tourneux ei2
Les écrans souples liotard guilbault tourneux ei2
aliotard
 
Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0
Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0
Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0
IBM France Lab
 
Business Technology - La transformation numérique
Business Technology - La transformation numériqueBusiness Technology - La transformation numérique
Business Technology - La transformation numérique
Jean-François Caenen
 
03 sujet electrobike tcin design
03 sujet electrobike tcin design03 sujet electrobike tcin design
03 sujet electrobike tcin design
OULAAJEB YOUSSEF
 

Similaire à Revue de presse IoT / Data du 17/12/2016 (20)

Les écrans souples liotard guilbault tourneux ei2
Les écrans souples   liotard guilbault tourneux ei2Les écrans souples   liotard guilbault tourneux ei2
Les écrans souples liotard guilbault tourneux ei2
 
DWW16 - Présentation Gimélec Agit 2016
DWW16 - Présentation Gimélec Agit 2016DWW16 - Présentation Gimélec Agit 2016
DWW16 - Présentation Gimélec Agit 2016
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 15/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 15/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 15/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 15/01/2017
 
Press coverage wildix france janvier 2016
Press coverage wildix  france janvier 2016Press coverage wildix  france janvier 2016
Press coverage wildix france janvier 2016
 
Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0
Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0
Bluemix Paris Meetup - Session #9 - 10 juin 2015 - Internet des Objets 3.0
 
Infose Février 2017 N°120
Infose Février 2017 N°120Infose Février 2017 N°120
Infose Février 2017 N°120
 
Business Technology - La transformation numérique
Business Technology - La transformation numériqueBusiness Technology - La transformation numérique
Business Technology - La transformation numérique
 
Tria lettre api_2020_
Tria lettre api_2020_Tria lettre api_2020_
Tria lettre api_2020_
 
Forum Bimo 2016
Forum Bimo 2016Forum Bimo 2016
Forum Bimo 2016
 
Les 35 technologies de 2018 à forts enjeux stratégiques
Les 35 technologies de 2018 à forts enjeux stratégiquesLes 35 technologies de 2018 à forts enjeux stratégiques
Les 35 technologies de 2018 à forts enjeux stratégiques
 
Internet des objets : choses vues
Internet des objets : choses vuesInternet des objets : choses vues
Internet des objets : choses vues
 
03 sujet electrobike tcin design
03 sujet electrobike tcin design03 sujet electrobike tcin design
03 sujet electrobike tcin design
 
Industrie 4 for aiac
Industrie 4 for aiacIndustrie 4 for aiac
Industrie 4 for aiac
 
Compte-rendu conférence "Green Economy : Objets Connectés et Opportunités cré...
Compte-rendu conférence "Green Economy : Objets Connectés et Opportunités cré...Compte-rendu conférence "Green Economy : Objets Connectés et Opportunités cré...
Compte-rendu conférence "Green Economy : Objets Connectés et Opportunités cré...
 
Débrief GITEX Dubaï 2023
Débrief GITEX Dubaï 2023Débrief GITEX Dubaï 2023
Débrief GITEX Dubaï 2023
 
Prédictions TMT 2020 finale
Prédictions TMT 2020 finalePrédictions TMT 2020 finale
Prédictions TMT 2020 finale
 
L'Internet des Objets, les nouvelles frontières de l'industrie
L'Internet des Objets, les nouvelles frontières de l'industrie L'Internet des Objets, les nouvelles frontières de l'industrie
L'Internet des Objets, les nouvelles frontières de l'industrie
 
La technologie des smart grids - Fabien Hegoburu
La technologie des smart grids - Fabien HegoburuLa technologie des smart grids - Fabien Hegoburu
La technologie des smart grids - Fabien Hegoburu
 
Conception et réalisation d’un MINI SMART HOME
Conception et réalisation  d’un MINI SMART HOMEConception et réalisation  d’un MINI SMART HOME
Conception et réalisation d’un MINI SMART HOME
 
Dossier de presse de #cloudwatt du 2 oct 2012
Dossier de presse de #cloudwatt du 2 oct 2012Dossier de presse de #cloudwatt du 2 oct 2012
Dossier de presse de #cloudwatt du 2 oct 2012
 

Plus de Romain Bochet

Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing SystemsUsage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Romain Bochet
 

Plus de Romain Bochet (15)

Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data / Energie du 02/04/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 13/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/03/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 26/02/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 19/02/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 04/02/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 28/01/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 22/01/2017
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 24/12/2016
 
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
Revue de presse IoT / Data du 01/12/2016
 
Big data
Big dataBig data
Big data
 
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing SystemsUsage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
Usage based security Framework for Collaborative Computing Systems
 

Revue de presse IoT / Data du 17/12/2016

  • 1. Revue de presse IoT / Data du 17/12/2016 Bonjour, Voici la revue de presse IoT/data/energie du 17 décembre 2016. Je suis preneur d'autres artices / sources ! Bonne lecture ! Table des matières 1. Could Disposable Printed Electronics Be the Future of Packaging? 2. Electric Motorcycle Doubles As Residential Storage Battery 3. Airbus, Michelin, Safran, Vallourec... : pourquoi les industriels foncent sur l’IoT 4. Home Energy Management Devices To Bring In Revenue Of $7.8 Billion In 2025, Predicts Navigant 5. Le drone lampadaire chasse les zones d'ombre 6. Concevoir les objets connectés des autres, le nouveau métier de l'IoT 7. Will autonomous microgrids drive IoT in smart cities? 8. Autoconsommation photovoltaïque : le système de gestion MyLight amélioré grâce à de nouveaux algorithmes - Les-SmartGrids.fr 9. The Year That Was (and Was Not) For The Internet Of Things 10. Energy Company Offers Free Charging for Electric Vehicles 11. Le robotique à la demande et l'IA, au top des prévisions d'IDC Could Disposable Printed Electronics Be the Future of Packaging? Summary Printed electronics is going to be the largest sector of electronics if it does not replace standard electronic practices altogether. While the devices made by ThinFilm are very simple, they clearly have advantages when it comes to mass production and the art of integrating electronics into mundane objects, starting with the packaging that we throw out every day. Integrating electronics into everyday life isn't all smartphones and automated cars. Even our disposable products, especially packaging, can become high tech. Silicon-free printed electronics could give rise to tech that's designed to be thrown away.
  • 2. Changing Product Design and Fabrication with Printed Printed electronics have made the news multiple times in the past year. They offer the electronics industry something that has only ever been available to semiconductor manufacturers in the past: the ability to have a fully customized circuit with customized components. Currently, production of the typical circuit board goes something like this: First, the board is designed and printed. When the PCB is ready to be populated, parts are ordered from distributors which are then placed onto the PCB either by hand or by machine. Once the parts are in place, the PCB (with components) is then sent to be placed into the final product (unless the PCB, itself, is the final product). If a design change is needed in this process, engineers may need to do some redesigning (sometimes of the PCB overall), change the component list, and then change the entire production line to account for this change. The time it takes to make changes can cost a company both money and resources with typical PCB lead times being seven days. These seven days translate to seven days of stalled production and consequently, seven days of effectively no sales. This is where printed electronics can really make a difference. Imagine a circuit has been designed and needs to be prototyped. Instead of sending for the PCB to be fabricated and then hand-constructing the unit, the printed design is sent to a 3D printer which produces the functioning circuit (with all connections) in a matter of hours. The final product, also made from printed electronics, takes only hours to produce with few intermediate steps and non-reliance on distributors for parts. If a design change is needed, it can be made easily by feeding the new designs to the fabricator where immediate changes can be made to the new circuits made on the production line. Printed electronics may have another potential use that silicon may never be able to match: mass production in the trillions. The Problem with Silicon Silicon enables the creation of all manner of circuits ranging from power control to high- end computer processing. For the past 50 years, silicon has been able to fulfill industry demand by providing better devices every year. While semiconductor device power is slowly approaching its limit, there is one aspect of semiconductor devices that the industry has not thought of. Currently, some 20 billion microcontrollers are produced which is more than enough for applications such as computing, IoT devices, and other devices. However, if electronics are to be integrated into all products, including packaging for commercial items in shops, then 20 billion devices just won't cut it. So how can printed electronics help here? Electronics needed for all packaging (including a box of six eggs) do not need to be overly advanced with peripherals such as USB, TCP stacks, or even GPIO. In order to make everyday packaging high tech, such devices would only need a very basic processor connected to a near field communication link, so that functions such as security scanning and product information could be implemented. This is exactly what ThinFilm (a Norwegian Company) is planning to do.
  • 3. Tiny, Printable, Disposable Processors Currently, ThinFilm specializes in printed electronics in the form of smart labels for perishable products (such as food), non-volatile printed memory, and near field communication. To meet the expected demand for the integration of electronics, the company purchased a manufacturing facility in Silicon Valley which it will retrofit to produce some five billion printed devices that are estimated to have a value of $680 million. What makes these devices “mass production friendly” is that they are fabricated on a flexible substrate that can be reeled like paper. So not only are these devices easier to produce than semiconductors, they are both flexible and easily stored. The fact that these devices can be stored on rolls make them ideal for the packaging industry which uses paper and cardboard on near identical rolls. Therefore, these devices could be, in theory, loaded into similar machinery and then stamped onto the required packaging (effectively integrating multiple stages into one continuous operation). Their non-volatile printed memory technology has already been purchased by Xerox who already has production-scale manufacturing taking place in Webster, NY.
  • 4. Printed rolls of memory. Image courtesy of ThinFilm However, this is not enough for ThinFilm, and they are currently working towards a more radical plan: to have an entire processor printed on their substrate (though it would be a simplistic processor). The current goal is to integrate several thousand logic gates in the hope of creating a device that has the computational power of the Intel 4004 (which had 2,400 gates). Their near field communication device has 1500 gates, whereas their temperature sensor has 2,000 gates. This means that (in theory), they are only 400 gates shy of a 4004 processor. While many may believe that a device as simple as a 4004 is no longer relevant in the world, creating one on this substrate would actually be an extremely relevant accomplishment. A label armed with a 4-bit processor and some non-volatile memory
  • 5. could suddenly be used to process data such as item ID changes, date changes, sensor processing, and much more. The use of such simple processors in product packaging (along with near field communication, found in many smartphones) can open customers and distributors to a whole new world. For example, the printed labels could be scanned by a smartphone and return information, including the authenticity of the product, potential allergy warnings, and manufacturing details. Electric Motorcycle Doubles As Residential Storage Battery Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/16/electric-motorcycle-doubles- residential-storage-battery/ December 16th, 2016 by Steve Hanley They say there is nothing new under the sun, but the Jahammer J1 electric motorcycle comes about as close as you can get. Johann Hammerschmid, founder of Johammer E- mobility Inc, says of his oddly styled creation, “This is a natural return to the concept of the horse, before there was noise and pollution from engines.” Some have compared its looks to a giant peanut or a horse used for jousting in the Middle Ages, but it also looks a lot like a cross between a Cushman motor scooter from the 1950’s and a Quonset hut.
  • 6. The bike features a 12 kWh battery that is good for up to 186 miles of range on the highway — less in hilly terrain or off road use. That makes it the longest range electric motorcycle on the market. Some 60 Johammer J1’s have been sold in Europe since 2014. Hammerschmidt says he first started thinking about building the bike in 2017. His factory is located in eastern Austria near the Czech border. Two striking features of the bike are the corrugated polypropylene bodywork and the center hub steering system. Hammershcmidt says it takes just a few miles aboard the J1 to get used to its handling characteristics. The J1 has no dashboard. Data displays are included in each rear view mirror instead. Rotating the throttle away from the rider engages regenerative braking. The more twist, the more the bike slows. There is also a reverse gear to assist in parking. Wheels, brake discs and tires are purchased from outside suppliers to make sure the bikes are road legal. Everything else is built and assembled in house. But that’s only half the story of the Johammer J1. With a battery only slightly smaller than the latest Tesla Powerwall, it can be plugged in when riding is done and serve as a storage battery for a home or small business. That makes it ideal for those who have a residential solar panel installation. “A motorcycle like this is weather-dependent, so no vehicle is better suited for a secondary role as storage,” Hammerschmidt says. He is proud of the fact that his invention does not quite fit any conventional description. Is it a storage battery on wheels or a motorcycle that is also a storage battery? “We’re at the stage cars were at 100 years ago. The infrastructure was limited but it grew quickly,” says Hammerschmid. “The same will happen with e-vehicles, and it won’t just be gas stations used for recharging.” Homes, workplaces, shopping malls, parking garages—all will become places to recharge. “The change of pace will be quicker than we currently
  • 7. imagine,” he says. The top of the line Johammer J1 is priced at around $27,000 and the company has begun a crowdfunding campaign to help pay for an expansion of production. Hammerschmidt says he is riding the early wave of multi-function green transport. “This trend is irreversible, we are seeing it in all sectors and especially those connected with mobility.” He may be correct, but his creation still looks weird from every angle. Perhaps that is the price of innovation. Airbus, Michelin, Safran, Vallourec... : pourquoi les industriels foncent sur l’IoT Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/airbus-michelin-safran-vallourec-foncent-iot- 165186.html Lors du salon Smart Industries, de grands industriels ont témoigné de leur intérêt pour l’IoT. Qui, grâce à des réseaux comme Sigfox ou Lora, permet de dépasser les limites du RFID. Et d’inventer de nouveaux usages. En matière d’IoT, le temps des tests en laboratoire ou des prototypes apparaît bel et bien révolu. Place aux déploiements à l’échelle industrielle. C’est en tout cas le constat qui se dégage après le salon Smart Industries, qui se tenait la semaine dernière à Paris Nord Villepinte. Certes, les déploiements en masse, comme ceux de Décathlon et ses 700 millions de tags RFID à l’année, sont encore l’exception, mais plusieurs facteurs se combinent pour accélérer l’industrialisation. A commencer, précisément, par les alternatives au RFID, alternatives ne nécessitant pas l’installation d’infrastructures pour récolter les données (comme des portiques). C’est par exemple ce qui a permis à Zimmer Biomet de proposer une traçabilité de ses implants médicaux sur toute la chaîne logistique, y compris au sein des hôpitaux. « L’objectif de ce projet est de s’assurer que les hôpitaux disposent de tous les éléments nécessaires au moment de leur intervention », résume Raoul Barthez, le directeur opérationnel de cette société américaine. Or, installer des portiques RFID chez l’ensemble des clients de la société était inenvisageable. Zimmer Biomet travaille aujourd’hui avec quelques hôpitaux et cliniques pilotes afin qu’ils intègrent les données recueillies à leurs logiciels internes. Airbus mise sur un cocktail de réseaux « Avec l’IoT, on étend le champ des possibles sur toute la chaîne de valeur en matière de traçabilité, abonde Nicolas Monturet, architecte SI chez Airbus. Mais on peut aussi amener de nouveaux usages, modifier l’expérience des passagers. » Reste, pour un avionneur dont les produits parcourent le globe, à trouver une infrastructure de communication disponible partout dans le monde, ce qui, à ce jour, est encore un peu illusoire. « Il faut donc concevoir une architecture modulaire, car une seule technologie ne
  • 8. répondra pas à tous les besoins », dit Nicolas Monturet. Airbus a fait le choix de déployer une passerelle permettant de se connecter à différents réseaux. Pour Jean-François Lecosse, directeur du CNRFID (centre national de référence sur la RFID), l’arrivée de nouvelles infrastructures, comme les réseaux Lora ou Sigfox, permet avant tout d’étendre le suivi des actifs, « un domaine où généralement, on a affaire à une personne avec un tableau Excel, une personne sait que ce que les données de ce tableau sont fausses et qu’elle va perdre environ 10 % des actifs suivis par an. » Avec le RFID, un suivi plus fin était limité aux contenus de grande valeur, du fait du coût d’installation des infrastructures. Des technologies comme Lora et Sigfox permettent de s’affranchir de cette contrainte, donc d’amener un suivi automatisé y compris sur des biens de valeur plus modeste. Vallourec : des puces enfouies dans des tubes On retrouve même des projets IoT dans des environnements où on ne les attend pas forcément, comme chez Vallourec, fabricant de tubes en acier sans soudures et de solutions tubulaires spécifiques. « Contrairement à ce qu’on imagine, ce sont des produits de haute technicité. Tous les tubes sont marqués avec un code, le passage à l’IoT va faciliter un accès plus systématique aux données relatives à la vie du produit et nous permettre d’envisager de nouvelles optimisations », résume Renaud de Lapeyrière, le directeur du développement du groupe. Même si, évidemment, les contraintes inhérentes aux métiers de Vallourec, qui travaille beaucoup avec le secteur de l’énergie (gaz, pétrole), rendent le projet complexe. « Il faut intégrer des puces au sein de produits soumis à des contraintes élevées, sans entamer l’intégrité du produit et tout en garantissant la résistance à la manutention », ajoute le responsable de Vallourec. Un domaine finalement peu défriché où l’industriel a eu quelques surprises, dues notamment à l’environnement métallique où est intégrée la puce et à son encapsulation qui crée des décalages de fréquence. « Nous avons eu besoin de compétences externes. Probablement aussi parce que nous n’en sommes qu’au premier projet de ce type. Dans 10 ans, le constat sera peut-être différent », ajoute Renaud de Lapeyrière. Tâtonner : un passage obligé pour Jean-François Lecosse. « Toutes les sociétés industrielles doivent entrer ce monde-là, car y aller tôt, c’est comprendre les enjeux
  • 9. colossaux qui y sont associés, quitte à essuyer quelques revers comme ce fut le cas avec le RFID », assure-t-il. Enjeux de transformation des produits en service (comme on le voit dans l’aéronautique où l’unité de compte devient l’heure de vol), enjeux de montée dans la chaîne de valeur (comme ce concepteur de bacs plastiques pour médicaments qui, via l’ajout d’un capteur de température, fournit un service de transfert de responsabilité à ses clients) ou de collaboration à l’échelle d’une chaîne industrielle. « Moins vous avez d’acteurs en amont et en aval, plus vous êtes capables de mettre rapidement en place une solution apportant des gains partagés à toute la chaîne de valeur », résume Jean- François Lecosse. Safran : acquérir des données complémentaires Photo : Kiefer, via VisualHunt.com, CC BY-SA A condition de savoir comment exploiter pertinemment les données recueillies. Si les technologies, notamment prédictives, sont là, le marché tâtonne encore en matière de nouveaux usages. « Un A380, avion ultra-connecté, cumule 800 000 paramètres, soit quelques Go de données par vol. Reste à savoir que faire de ces données, à développer les cas d’usage structurants qui vont apporter de la valeur à l’entreprise », dit Emmanuel Couturier, chef de programme innovation et business développement de Safran. Comme certains équipements (trains d’atterrissage, moteurs…) sont désormais loués et non achetés, l’industriel a besoin de mieux maîtriser le cycle de vie de ses produits pour se conformer aux termes de ses contrats.« On va alors se rendre compte qu’il nous manque certaines données ici ou là, précise Emmanuel Couturier. C’est là que l’IoT amène une réelle révolution, car il va nous permettre d’acquérir des paramètres complémentaires, grâce à des réseaux comme Lora ou Sigfox ». Safran mobilise une équipe de 20 à 40 data scientists sur ces sujets. « C’est important de maîtriser ces technologies en interne », assure Emmanuel Couturier.
  • 10. Les enjeux de maintenance prédictive sont également au centre des réflexions de SKF, groupe suédois spécialiste des roulements à mécanique. « Interpréter ce qui se passe sur le roulement, c’est comprendre ce qui se passe sur la machine », veut croire Christophe Godel, le directeur de la BU Solutions & Services de SKF France. Pour l’industriel, les dernières technologies d’IoT lui permettent aujourd’hui d’intégrer la mesure au plus près du roulement proprement dit. « Nous avons commencé il y a trois ans dans le domaine de l’éolien. Nous savons aujourd’hui prédire que telle panne a tel risque de survenir sur telle marque d’éolienne », reprend le dirigeant. SKF espère désormais démultiplier le procédé et le simplifier pour l’adapter à des composants plus petits que ceux des éoliennes. Michelin : les pneus connectés Chez Michelin, l’IoT est avant tout vu comme un vecteur de services complémentaires. « Nous avons démarré sur des usages particuliers, en l’occurrence la mesure de pression et de température de pneus de camions exploités sur des installations minières, des véhicules qui doivent fonctionner en permanence pour ne pas arrêter la production. Nous avons donc vendu la remontée d’alertes comme un service supplémentaire. Aujourd’hui, les prix des capteurs et de la technologie ont baissé et on peut imaginer généraliser ce type de mesures à la voiture de Monsieur tout le monde. Reste à imaginer le service pertinent pour ces utilisateurs », explique Olivier Coulomb, le directeur informatique scientifique de la firme de Clermont-Ferrand.
  • 11. Eric Payan, DSI et CDO de Bosch La démarche est similaire chez Bosch : « La première finalité est d’apporter de nouveaux services ou des services de meilleure qualité aux utilisateurs de nos produits finis (réfrigérateurs, chaudières de marque elm Leblanc, etc. , NDLR), dit Eric Payan, le DSI et Chief Digital Officer de Bosch. Mais recueillir des données permet aussi de mieux connaître le cycle de vie de nos produits et d’entrer dans une démarche d’amélioration continue. » Un pas de géant par rapport aux pratiques anciennes, comme le confirme Olivier Coulomb de Michelin : « auparavant, notre connaissance était partielle ; les études demandaient des mois et restaient imprécise. Il suffit désormais d’équiper quelques centaines de camions pour récupérer une foule de données très précises ». Des informations qui, associées à la connaissance du produit que détient Michelin, se révèlent précieuses. Home Energy Management Devices To Bring In Revenue Of $7.8 Billion In 2025, Predicts Navigant Source URL: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/12/home-energy-management- devices-bring-revenue-7-8-billion-2025-navigant/ Home Energy Management Devices To Bring In Revenue Of $7.8 Billion In 2025, Predicts Navigant
  • 12. December 12th, 2016 by Joshua S Hill The global market for home energy management devices such as smart thermostats is growing, and expected to continue to grow, with a new report predicting global revenue for the market to reach $7.8 billion in 2025. Navigant Reserch published its findings in a new report this week, entitled Market Data: Home Energy Management, in which it examines the global home energy management market with a focus on four separate categories — home energy reports (HERs), digital tools, standalone Home Energy Management (HEM), and networked HEM. Together, these four categories comprise the current technologies currently allowing consumers to better manage and control their energy consumption, as well as providing utilities and non-energy services to better engage with their consumers. The authors of the report predict global revenue in the HEM market to grow from almost $2.3 billion this year, to $7.8 billion in 2025, a compound annual growth rate of 14.4%. Unsurprisingly, Navigant predicts the North American market to represent the lion’s share of the market, growing from $1.4 billion in 2016 to $3.1 billion in 2025. Europe and the Asia Pacific will both reach 2025 with a $2.2 billion HEM market, while Latin America and the Middle East & Africa are not expected to see much growth at all. HEM Revenue by Region, World Markets: 2016-2025 The report also highlights several trends shaping the HEM market. In-home displays are losing traction in the market, with a number of digital channels such as web-portals and mobile applications making this particular market obsolete in North America — though these technologies are still at play in several European regions, including the United Kingdom. Additionally, Navigant sees new players transitioning from the market from HEM to smart homes. According to Navigant, utilities have taken a much less active part in the HEM market, driving non-energy service providers to fill the gap. As a result, the HEM market is
  • 13. transitioning from a focus on holistic energy management to energy management as part of a smart-home solution, including other products such as home security, automation, and entertainment. “Non-traditional players have a claim on the HEM market with their existing in-home offerings, and are driving a shift in the market from holistic HEM to energy management as a component of the connected home,” says Paige Leuschner, research analyst with Navigant Research. “Relatively flat electricity prices and the ability to offer HEM without smart metering has caused utilities to take a passive role in this market in place of non- energy service providers.” Le drone lampadaire chasse les zones d'ombre Source URL: http://www.atelier.net/trends/articles/drone-lampadaire-chasse-zones- ombre_444333 Par Quentin Delzanni 08 décembre 2016 ​Si les lampadaires pullulent dans les villes, ils se font beaucoup plus discrets en campagne, et ce notamment du fait des coûts, en énergie, matériel et entretien, nécessaire à leur bon fonctionnement. Un projet testé à Petworth dans la campagne britannique tente d’apporter une solution. Londres, Barcelone ou Las Vegas sont actuellement en pleine recherche d’innovations autour de leurs trottoirs, lampadaires et plus largement de la manière d’optimiser l’éclairage public, le projet Fleetlights de Direct Line pourrait quant à lui intéresser les plus petites communes et bourgs à travers le monde. Le point de départ de cette innovation est un constat simple : plutôt que de mettre à disposition des points fixes de lumière, pas souvent utiles dans ces lieux, pourquoi ne pas faire venir la lumière à la demande d’un
  • 14. utilisateur, et ce pour la totalité de son trajet. La flotte de drone équipée de projecteurs attend donc la nuit tombée pour s’activer et trouver son utilité. À la manière d’un VTC, depuis une application de son portable, il suffit de commander un drone sur sa position, pour que celui-ci rejoigne et accompagne l’utilisateur lors de son trajet pédestre ou véhiculé. On retrouve un système de fonctionnement similaire aux drones vidéos qui, piloté automatiquement grâce à la connexion au smartphone de l’utilisateur, gravitent autour des sportifs afin de capturer leurs exploits. C’est ici le même principe, la caméra étant « remplacée » par un projecteur. Pour Fleetlights, une fois la destination atteinte, une simple commande dans l’application renvoi le drone à son entrepôt de départ. Créer pour sauver des vies sur les routes non éclairées et rassurer les personnes vivant dans ces zones rurales parfois peu illuminées, le projet développé en open source semble avoir un très grand nombre d’évolutions possibles. Notamment, on pourrait le retrouver dans le domaine de la recherche et du sauvetage de personnes en péril en montagne par exemple. Concevoir les objets connectés des autres, le nouveau métier de l'IoT Source URL: http://www.journaldunet.com/ebusiness/internet-mobile/1189354- conception-industrialisation-objets-connectes/ Mis à jour le 07/12/16 16:15 Rares sont les entreprises capables de fabriquer un appareil intelligent de A à Z. Pour les aider, des sociétés de conseil d'un nouveau genre apparaissent. Electronique, mécanique, télécommunication, vente… Les entreprises sont rarement des couteaux suisses capables de trouver en interne l'ensemble des compétences nécessaires à la production et à la commercialisation d'un objet connecté lorsque ce n'est pas leur métier de base. "Pour parvenir au bout de leur projet, certaines contactent un par un les spécialistes de chaque branche métier dont elles ont besoin. Cela leur demande de jongler avec de multiples interlocuteurs et elles perdent du temps. D'autres s'offrent les services d'un professionnel de la conception et de l'industrialisation des objets connectés pour des tiers", explique Yanis Cottard, coprésident du groupe Altyor, dont c'est le business. Cette holding orléanaise est née en 2012 de la fusion des deux sous-traitants industriels PDCI et Technochina (qui ont respectivement vu le jour en 1987 et 2000). Deux autres filiales ont depuis été créées : le distributeur de produits high-tech et IoT Tiloli (2004) et le fabricant d'appareils domotiques NodOn (2013). Chacune des branches qui composent Altyor développe d'un côté son activité propre et met de l'autre son savoir-faire à disposition de la holding. Cela permet au groupe de proposer un service de bout en bout aux clients qui le désirent. Les autres peuvent n'avoir recours qu'à une partie de l'offre Altyor. Ils passent de l'idée au produit industrialisé en neuf mois au lieu de 18 en moyenne.
  • 15. Altyor a réalisé 37 millions d'euros de chiffre d'affaires en 2015, dont 25% sont liés à ses activités de conseil IoT Le groupe se présente comme un précurseur du secteur du conseil IoT. "Nous aidons depuis 8 ans les entreprises à concevoir leurs objets connectés, autant dire la Préhistoire dans ce champ d'activité naissant", s'amuse le patron. Il y a deux ans, 100% des clients d'Altyor étaient encore des start-up. "Aujourd'hui nous signons un tiers de nos contrats avec de grands groupes", précise Yanis Cottard, qui ne souhaite pas révéler les noms de ces entreprises. Cette activité de conseil IoT est déjà rentable pour Altyor, selon le dirigeant. Le groupe réalisera en tout 37 millions d'euros de chiffre d'affaires en 2016, dont 25% sont liés à ses activités de conception, de prototypage, de production et de distribution d'objets connectés pour des tiers. La start-up iSwip se focalise sur une partie moins large de la chaîne de valeur : elle aide les entreprises à passer d'un projet IoT à un produit industrialisé mais ne gère pas la distribution. Créée en 2011 et basée à Dagneux (Ain), cette jeune pousse a développé un catalogue de 14 objets connectés génériques, dotés de fonctions de base qui peuvent répondre à un maximum de besoins différents (capteurs de température, d'humidité, trackers GPS…). Si la demande du client correspond, il lui suffit de passer commande et d'apposer son logo sur l'appareil, commercialisé par iSwip en marque blanche. Moyennant finance, la jeune pousse peut également ajouter certaines fonctionnalités à ses objets connectés génériques, pour les adapter à un besoin plus spécifique. iSwip propose aussi à ses clients de concevoir avec eux un appareil 100% sur-mesure. "iSwip a été approchée à plusieurs reprises par des sociétés de conseil classiques pour être rachetée" Les entreprises qui optent pour un objet connecté sur catalogue reçoivent les produits finis en huit à douze semaines en moyenne. S'ils choisissent le sur-mesure, ils doivent compter six mois. "Mais nous ne mettons que trois semaines à concevoir un prototype. Si jamais la première version ne convient pas, nos clients peuvent décider d'en réaliser un autre.", souligne Emmanuel Torchy, CEO d'iSwip. Neuf des clients de la pépite tricolore font partie du Cac 40. iSwip devrait réaliser 800 000 euros de chiffre d'affaires en 2016 et prévoit d'ici trois ans de passer à 3 millions. "Aujourd'hui nous n'avons que quelques concurrents. Les entreprises de conseil traditionnelles ne disposent pas en interne des compétences nécessaires pour nous faire de l'ombre. Mais elles s'intéressent de près à ce marché : nous avons été approchés à plusieurs reprises pour être rachetés mais nous avons décliné", glisse le PDG, pour qui le secteur se consolidera dans les années à venir. D'autres acteurs de ce marché neuf, comme la start-up Thingtype, se concentrent sur une fraction encore plus étroite de la chaîne de valeur. "Nous aidons les entreprises à passer d'une maquette pas très présentable, avec des branchements et des fils qui partent dans tous les sens, à un prototype plus intégré, fonctionnant avec une carte électronique", explique Armel Fourreau, le président de la jeune pousse parisienne, créée en avril 2016. Un prototype qui pourra être présenté à de potentiels clients, testé sur le terrain, montré à un investisseur… Les algorithmes d'automatisation développés par Thingtype lui permettent de ne facturer ses cartes électroniques que 200 euros pièce en moyenne
  • 16. En général, les entreprises emploient des bureaux d'études qui leur facturent en moyenne 40 000 euros pour réaliser cette étape. Un ingénieur choisit une série de composants qui correspondent aux différentes fonction de la maquette de départ. Il épluche une à une leurs descriptions techniques afin de vérifier s'ils sont compatibles entre eux. Il travaille ensuite sur le plan de la carte électronique sur laquelle seront fixés ces éléments. Une étape très complexe. "Un simple capteur de température compte souvent plus de 60 composants. Les pattes de chacun de ces éléments ne doivent pas se croiser sinon l'appareil ne fonctionne pas", détaille le dirigeant. Les ingénieurs mettent plusieurs semaines à réaliser ce travail à la main. "Nous avons développé un logiciel qui automatise ces taches à faible valeur ajoutée. Il ne met que quelques secondes à réaliser ces opérations. Les entreprises ont leur carte électronique en main au bout de seulement quatre semaines, contre quatre mois en moyenne avec les bureaux d'études", affirme Armel Fourreau. Les clients de Thingtype ne rencontrent jamais les salariés de la start-up : ils décrivent dans un formulaire en ligne les différentes caractéristiques de leur maquette. Cette digitalisation des process permet à l'entreprise de compresser au maximum ses coûts de production et de ne facturer ses cartes électroniques que 200 euros pièce en moyenne. Concevoir un objet connecté : 9 règles d'or pour faire aboutir son projet Pour développer un appareil intelligent abouti, les entreprises doivent choisir le bon réseau et opter pour une source d'énergie adaptée. Will autonomous microgrids drive IoT in smart cities? Source URL: http://readwrite.com/2016/10/05/microgrids-will-boost-iot-adoption- smart-cities-cl1/ Posted on October 5, 2016 The ability of microgrids to operate autonomously from larger grids could prove to be a major driver of Internet of Things (IoT) adoption in smart cities of the future. A recent Intel Grid Insights blog piece by Andres Carvallo1 discussed the pivotal role microgrids will play in smart cities of the future. Carvallo is CEO of CMG, a consultancy that advises on smart grids and other infrastructure. Microgrids are small, local energy grids with control capability that allows them to be disconnected from traditional utility grids. Carvallo says this capability to operate independently will make microgrids a key driver for smart city adoption of IoT technology. “Highly instrumented microgrids can strengthen grid resilience and help minimize outages in the larger utility grid,” said Carvallo. “Microgrids are designed to enable two-way power
  • 17. flow and two-way dataflow that require pervasive instrumentation and connectivity on just about every device within it.” See also:Can IoT turn back climate change? Multiple technologies power microgrids, including natural gas CHP engines, fuel cells, batteries, solar technology and diesel generators. And IoT will play a role with such equipment that requires sensors, connectivity, analytics, machine learning optimization and software for managing devices and energy. Carvallo says that microgrids have grown to over 1.2 gigawatts (GW) in capacity, with future projections reaching 20GW by 2020 and 100GW by 2030. Microgrids provide greater reliability Key reasons microgrids are being increasingly deployed in communities across the U.S. are their high reliability, lower costs, reduced emissions and asset security. End users include military bases, research labs, smart cities, universities, islands and other remote communities. With more than 100 players in the field today, he identifies several areas where IoT and microgrids will provide opportunities in the future. “Solutions that include things like control and energy management software, modeling and feasibility analysis tools, building energy management systems, home energy management systems, switching gear, protection gear, inverters, grid interconnectors, batteries and energy storage, storage management systems, communications networks, power meters, microprocessors, sensors, and gateways, to name a few,” he says. Autoconsommation photovoltaïque : le système de gestion MyLight amélioré grâce à de nouveaux algorithmes - Les- SmartGrids.fr Source URL: http://www.les-smartgrids.fr/innovation-et-vie- quotidienne/13122016,autoconsommation-photovoltaique-le-systeme-de-gestion- mylight-ameliore-grace-a-de-nouveaux-algorithmes,1949.html Rédigé par Vincent Gaillard | Le 13 décembre 2016 à 09:34 Les experts en mathématiques d’Eurodecision, société socialisé dansl'intelligence artificielle et le big data, ont planché sur la solution d'autoconsommation photovoltaïque e MyLight Systems afin d'y intégrer des algorithmes plus puissants reposant sur le Machine Learning. Un travail qui a permis d'améliorer l'efficacité du
  • 18. système, et surtout le rendre plus intelligent. Du solaire sur-mesure Ondine Suavet, co-fondatrice de MyLight Systems explique que le choix de faire appel à Eurodécision a été motivé par le fait que MyLight n'utilisait jusque ici qu'une équation mathématique, impossible, au final, d'adapter l'outil en fonction des besoins spécifiques de chaque domicile. Mais cette première phase n'a pas été inutile, car le système dispose désormais d'une base de données intéressante, permettant de faire des prévisions beaucoup plus justes et donc de proposer du sur-mesure. MyLight Systems est une solution permettant de relier des panneaux solaires à une centrale de gestion regroupant thermostat, smart plugs et logiciel. Les utilisateurs peuvent ainsi bénéficier d'une facture d'électricité réduite grâce à leur production photovoltaïque. Eurodecision a agi sur le système MyLight en enrichissant les trois algorithmes sur lesquels était basé le processus. Le premier d'entre eux donne la possibilité d'avoir des prévisions de production d'énergie en fonctions des données de l'habitation et de la météo. Le deuxième va calculer au degré le plus fin possible les prévisions deconsommationdu domicile auquel le système est relié et le troisième va planifier les heures et durées de consommation des appareils électriques utilisés par les occupants, de manière à réduire les dépenses énergétiques. Le troisième algorithme se base sur les données chiffrées des deux précédents, en effet, il additionne les prévisions de ressources à celles de consommation du domicile selon l'appareillage utilisé par les occupants (l'électronique et le chauffage), ainsi que le comportement de ces derniers. Machine Learning Le système fonction également selon le principe du Machine Learning, autrement dit, plus il va être utilisé, plus celui-ci va apprendre de lui-même, en récoltant des données et en les analysant afin d'exploiter le maximum de ses capacités selon l'environnement dans lequel il est implanté. Selon Ondine Suavet, MyLight Systems est très heureux d'avoir pu travailler avec les mathématiciens de chez Eurodecision. Grâce à eux, MyLight Systems est désormais un système extrêmement pointu technologiquement parlant. The Year That Was (and Was Not) For The Internet Of Things Source URL: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/290734/the-year-that-was- and-was-not-for-the-internet-o.html
  • 19. As we prepare to say goodbye to another calendar year, much of the IoT-related conversation has revolved around where the Internet of Things is projected to go in the next year. This time last year, we heard a lot of predictions of where the coming year would bring the IoT as it related to growth, security and adoption. Some came true fully, some partially and some still need time to move from the planning stage to reality. So before moving into 2017, here are those that still need some more time before being fully realized: Standards Would Emerge to Move the IoT Quickly Forward. The IoT saw incredible growth in 2016, many of us presumed that we’d see much more standardization than we actually did. Standardization in the IoT is important for a number of reasons including helping to take the guesswork out of areas like security, interoperability and are crucial for long term sustainability. The promise of the Internet of Things is that everything will be connected and the key word there iseverything. As such, no one wants to buy a product that only works with one or a small handful of other connected products. They want their connected products to be universal and to work with current products on the market, as well as with new products being introduced. Standards will be necessary to make this happen and to move the IoT to the mainstream. More Clarity in the IoT Landscape. One of the biggest challenges plaguing the IoT is the complexity of the current landscape. All suppliers that offer IoT solutions today are combined in one singular, messy category. We did see significant progress this year with specialties beginning to emerge and categories getting more clearly defined. We see GE rising to the top in Industrial IoT and Amazon and Microsoft creating tool kits of IoT pieces that can be used to develop a custom solution. There is still work to be done to make all aspects of the IoT journey easier though. Hardware, security, analytics and a standardized architecture have yet to be fleshed out. Successful Business Models Will Lead by Example. While there are a lot of successful examples of IoT products, business models have varied widely from company to company and across verticals. Today, we have yet to see one tried and true, repeatable use case (better service, recurring revenue, product differentiation) that companies can replicate and trust that their bet on the IoT will lead to success and an improved bottom line. The sense of risk is getting lower every day, but being able follow the successes of other companies who have paved the way lessens the risk that much more. Even though these particular predictions didn’t see full realization in 2016, the market is moving in the right direction. One prediction we made for 2016 was that the IoT would move from the exploration phase to the execution phase, and I think that one was spot on. Thousands of companies have brought new connected products to market in 2016. It was a year of great maturity and growth for the IoT, and it’s clear to me that 2017 will only build on this momentum, taking another big step forward in the mission to build a smarter, more connected future. Energy Company Offers Free Charging
  • 20. for Electric Vehicles Source URL: http://www.smartgridobserver.com/n12-9-16-EV-charging.htm? utm_source=12-9-16&utm_campaign=SGO++12-9-16&utm_medium=email Clearview Energy, a leading residential supplier of 100% renewable energy, now offers free home Electric Vehicle (EV) charging for all of its customers. Transportation accounted for 34% of all carbon emissions in 2015. While transportation is crucial to the economy and people's personal lives, as a sector it is also a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. Further, a fundamental change in consumer purchasing and mobility behavior is crucial to any effort to reverse the global warming epidemic. The average across 2017 model EV's is projected to be 114 Miles Per Gallon(equivalent) MPG(e) in comparison to their non-EV counterparts at 40mpg. "It's time to embrace electric vehicles as the future, and to enjoy the benefits of a more stable, sustainable and less expensive mode of transportation," said Frank McGovern, president of Clearview Energy. "We cannot leave the health of our planet and our communities to chance. It's time to charge ahead, reduce our carbon footprint, and protect our planet." The partnership between Clearview Energy and ChargePoint, the world's largest EV charging network, is available to residential electricity consumers in select markets across the US. Under the new partnership, which is the first of its kind, EV owners with a ChargePoint Home station will enjoy free vehicle charging. Charging costs are refunded to the consumer in the form of a reimbursement. Clear Charge 12EV or Clear Charge 24EV program and enrollment details can be found at https://www.clearviewenergy.com Le robotique à la demande et l'IA, au top des prévisions d'IDC Source URL: http://www.silicon.fr/robotique-ia-top-previsions-idc-2017-164800.html L’avènement de la robotique en tant que service, la promotion du chief robotics officer et la pression réglementaire devraient marquer le secteur d’ici 2020, selon le cabinet IDC. La robotique industrielle et de service est stimulée par les développements technologiques dans l’intelligence artificielle (IA) et le Cloud. La tendance devrait se poursuivre en 2017 et au-delà, selon les prévisions d’IDC. La robotique en tant que service (RaaS) devrait également marquer le secteur. D’ici 2019, 30 % des applications commerciales de robotique seront distribuées « à la demande », selon IDC. Par ailleurs, les directeurs de la robotique (chief robotics officer) vont être davantage demandés. 30 % des grands groupes devraient se doter de la fonction dans les trois ans. Dans le même temps, la concurrence entre acteurs de la
  • 21. robotique et la guerre des talents vont s’intensifier. Bots, innovation et régulation La société d’études table également sur une hausse du salaire moyen d’experts d’au moins 60 % d’ici 2020. L’offre de compétences étant inférieure à la demande du marché. Résultat : 35 % des emplois dans la robotique ne trouveraient pas preneurs… Outre les difficultés de recrutements, de nouvelles contraintes réglementaires, spécifiques à la robotique, devraient peser sur les entreprises du secteur. Les gouvernements souhaitant à la fois tirer profit de la robotique et des applications d’intelligence artificielle, tout en préservant l’emploi, la sécurité et la vie privée. Enfin, IDC prévoit qu’un véritable marché Cloud de la robotique émerge. Des applications et robots connectés, en réseau, intelligents, capables de collaborer. L’industrie et le e- commerce sont loin d’être les seuls secteurs à se lancer. La logistique, la santé, les services publics et d’autres expérimentent l’utilisation de robots de nouvelle génération pour automatiser leurs opérations.