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Building an Inclusive Agriculture:
Strengthening Gender Equality in
Agricultural Value Chains
Deborah Rubin, Cultural Prac...
Background
Women in agriculture – anthropology, sociology,
rural development, agricultural economics
Economic value chain ...
Intentional Design for Gender
Equality and Women’s Empowerment
• Fosters equitable participation of men and women
across a...
Advances in Knowledge
• Extensive evidence on gender disparities
• on land ownership; access to credit, inputs, extension;...
Advances in Guidance
and Implementation
• Numerous guides on nearly every sub-sector in agriculture in
many geographies
• ...
Lessons Learned: Research
• Fill data gaps on:
• the capacities and characteristics of ALL women in
agriculture:
as smallh...
Lessons Learned: Practice
• Consult guidance to help projects
• Design deliberately
• Define gender equality goals -- what...
Finding synergies between research
and practice
Practice
• Expanding women’s involvement
in poultry, fish, and livestock
c...
What’s Next?
• Supporting women agripreneurs across the value chain in:
• Expanding agribusinesses, e.g., CTA’s Value4Her ...
Our Challenge:
Moving Beyond Stereotypes
….proactively using evidence from research
and practice on gender dimensions of
a...
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Building an Inclusive Agriculture: Strengthening Gender Equality in Agricultural Value Chains

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By Deborah Rubin - Brenda Boonabaana - Cristina Manfre

Publié dans : Économie & finance
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Building an Inclusive Agriculture: Strengthening Gender Equality in Agricultural Value Chains

  1. 1. Building an Inclusive Agriculture: Strengthening Gender Equality in Agricultural Value Chains Deborah Rubin, Cultural Practice, LLC Brenda Boonabaana, Makerere University Cristina Manfre, TechnoServe
  2. 2. Background Women in agriculture – anthropology, sociology, rural development, agricultural economics Economic value chain analysis Global commodity chains Project documentation Research Practice Inclusive Agriculture Gender and Value ChainsL I T E R A T U R E … including those historically excluded from participation and/or benefits from their participation … reducing malnutrition & poverty
  3. 3. Intentional Design for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment • Fosters equitable participation of men and women across all nodes of the chain • Addresses women’s specific needs to reduce participation barriers • Supports women’s economic advancement through upgrading and entrepreneurship • Promotes gender-equitable market-driven solutions • Includes mechanisms to ensure that women benefit financially and can control those benefits • Supports women’s economic and overall empowerment Source: Rubin, Manfre, and Nichols Barrett (2009) Gender Relations Agricultural Value Chains Gender Relations Agricultural Value Chains Gender Relations The impact of value chains on gender equality and women’s empowerment can be positive or negative
  4. 4. Advances in Knowledge • Extensive evidence on gender disparities • on land ownership; access to credit, inputs, extension; transport; technology • Voluminous literature on women’s engagement in different value chains and different regions • Regional, cross-border and local trade in Africa • High value AND staple food crops; livestock and fish • VCs for nutrition • Linking VC engagement to women’s empowerment • Increasing attention to each VC node not only production
  5. 5. Advances in Guidance and Implementation • Numerous guides on nearly every sub-sector in agriculture in many geographies • Growing use of household methodologies and programs that involve spouses, mothers-in-law, and community leaders to achieve gender equality • Private sector recognition of the value of hiring, promoting, and retaining women as primary producers and wage/salaried workers AND working with women agripreneurs
  6. 6. Lessons Learned: Research • Fill data gaps on: • the capacities and characteristics of ALL women in agriculture: as smallholders, agripreneurs, or wage workers • women’s motivations for starting agribusinesses • systematically measuring results of VC development to identify which nodes and types of VCs lead to women’s empowerment • WEAI4VC is a tool to answer this question • Improve data quality • Use mixed methods, qualitative and quantitative methods • Don’t forget the long view
  7. 7. Lessons Learned: Practice • Consult guidance to help projects • Design deliberately • Define gender equality goals -- what do you want to happen? • Consider context • Men/women/youth - activities change from place to place over time • Support Village Savings and Loan Associations and Cooperatives as starting points for VC engagement • Promote women’s entrepreneurship – expanding from small to medium to large • Provide “bundled services” – e.g., credit with training • Explore public-private partnerships • Kenya Market-led Dairy Supply Chain Project
  8. 8. Finding synergies between research and practice Practice • Expanding women’s involvement in poultry, fish, and livestock chains • Benefits in nutrition and income, as well as control over income • Improved payment mechanisms • Private Sector innovation rewarding improved production practice • Sustainable Harvest’s Premium Sharing RewardsTM (coffee) Research • Collecting individual level, sex- disaggregated data on engagement in and benefits from value chains • Use of digital technologies by women • Strategies for empowerment: Reach, benefit, empower
  9. 9. What’s Next? • Supporting women agripreneurs across the value chain in: • Expanding agribusinesses, e.g., CTA’s Value4Her program • Transport, export, and higher value industries with higher returns • Climate-smart, sustainable businesses • Make agribusinesses workspaces safe spaces • Addressing gender-based violence across the value chain, in the family, the fields, and the factories: • Better evidence and intentional implementation -  working conditions • Researching “what works” for young men and women • Recognize the importance of context and demographics • Avoid “one size fits all” • Refining and standardizing gender and VC analysis methods • Mixed methods • Intersectionality
  10. 10. Our Challenge: Moving Beyond Stereotypes ….proactively using evidence from research and practice on gender dimensions of agricultural value chain operations to deliberately promote gender equality and women’s empowerment for the benefit of all.

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