Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Lean On Me: Student Life

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Prochain SlideShare
Teen depression
Teen depression
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 8 Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Similaire à Lean On Me: Student Life (20)

Publicité

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

Lean On Me: Student Life

  1. 1. Useful Links • www.Aware.ie • www.Samaritans.org • www.LeanOnMe.net • www.PleaseTalk.ie • www.Spunout.ie • www.HeadsUp.ie • www.YourMentalHealth.ie • www.MentalHealthIreland.ie References available upon request Successfully managing your mental health in collegewww.leanonme.net Lean on me Student Life LU4/2/12
  2. 2. There are a large number of symptoms of depression, and they can vary widely from person to person depending on age, gender and personality among other factors. Some of the most prominent symptoms include; • Feeling unhappy most of the time • Loss of interest in life • Feeling anxious, tense, agitated and irritable • Feeling guilty • Feeling tired a lot of the time • Low levels of energy • Excessive sleeping or insomnia • Loss of interest in sex • Avoiding other people • Difficulty concentrating • No self confidence • Feeling hopeless or worthless • Changes in weight / appetite • Negative thoughts or thoughts of suicide and death If a person has any number of these symptoms for 2 weeks or more, it is possible that they are depressed and should seek help by visiting their GP or student health centre. College is full of challenges, regardless of what year you’re in. These challenges can be exciting as well as nerve racking. The transition from secondary school to college may result in being away from home for the first time, mixing in new social circles and developing relationships – all on top of the challenge of completing college assignments and paying bills. Irish students have identified factors which cause the most stress as; college studies, financial matters, relationships, part-time work and living situations. Learning to cope with these challenges is key to protecting your health - physically, mentally and emotionally. If you are overwhelmed, or feel unable to cope, depression can sometimes develop. What is depression? Many people use the words “sadness” and “depression” interchangeably; however sadness is simply a part of the ups and downs of life whereas depression, on the other hand, is a medical condition. While it is characterised by feelings of negativity and despondency, somebody who is affected by depression may also experience feelings of apathy, emptiness and loneliness. Life events such as bereavement, job loss, relationship break-up or illness can make us feel sad, stressed, anxious or angry. Sometimes it can be difficult to say if someone is reacting normally to such a life event, or if they are not coping and have become clinically depressed. In many cases there is no obvious cause of depression. 2 3 leanonme.net leanonme.net
  3. 3. 4 5 Mythbusting There are many misconceptions around depression which can increase the stigma associated with the condition, and make it more difficult for someone to seek help. Here are some of the most common myths (and the truth behind them!): Myth: Depression is self-created. This is completely false. Depression is a medical illness and individuals cannot be blamed for it. Myth: If a person is depressed, there has to be an external factor bothering them. External factors are not always necessary to make a person depressed. It is now known that chemical changes in the brain can lead to depression without any external trigger. Myth: Once depressed, a person remains depressed throughout their life. In most cases, depression is treatable. Adequate treatment leads to resolution of the symptoms and the person can return to their usual state of health. Myth: Depression is not a real medical problem. Depression is a real and serious condition. It is no different than diabetes or heart disease in its ability to impact someone’s life. It can have both emotional and physical symptoms and make life very difficult for those who have it. Myth: Depression will just go away on its own. While for some people, depression may go away without treatment over time; this is not always the case. Without treatment, symptoms of depression can continue for weeks, months or even years. Depression can lead to suicide, the third leading cause of death for 18 to 24 year olds, reinforcing the importance of seeking treatment. Myth: Talking about depression only makes you more depressed. Talking about your feelings may help you or a friend recognise the need for professional help. By showing friendship and concern and giving uncritical support, you can encourage your friend to talk to his or her parents or another trusted adult, like a student health nurse or coach, about getting treatment. If your friend is reluctant to ask for help, you can talk to an adult on their behalf. FACT FACT FACT FACT FACT FACT Street artist, Maser, and Irish model, Louise Johnston support the Lean On Me campaign leanonme.net leanonme.net
  4. 4. 6 7 Statistically Speaking... Depression in Ireland is common regardless of age or sex, not least among students. Did you know that: • It is estimated that 15.6% of undergraduate students are affected by depression or anxiety • Undergraduate students are more likely to talk to a friend their own age about a problem • Male students are less likely to seek help and more likely to try to sort it out alone, take drugs, get drunk or do nothing • 1st and 2nd year students are more likely to try and ignore or do nothing about their depression • Final year students are more likely to suffer from depression than other undergraduates • Rates of suicide in 20 – 24 year olds is among the highest out of all age groups Lean On Your SU The Students’ Union in your college has a wide variety of supports and resources that are there to help students cope with the challenges of college life, both academic and non-academic. These resources may include; • Counselling services • Health centre • Chaplaincy • and academic staff among others For a full list of the services that your Students’ Union provides check out www.pleasetalk.ie. In some cases, the counselling services are facilitated by trained student volunteers who have most likely been through similar experiences themselves. They will be equipped with all the necessary skills and advice to help you when you feel down. Exam Stress Near exam time, your Students’ Union will probably make an extra effort to connect with the student body and try to put your minds at ease. But there is a lot that you can do yourself to avoid getting stressed out - exercising regularly, having a balanced, nutritious diet and maintaining a healthy sleeping pattern are key to staying in the right frame of mind to tackle the exams. This can be a very stressful part of the academic year for students, so contact your SU if you have any worries about the exams – whether you want to know more about the procedure of the exams, what happens if you miss or fail an exam or just general advice on how to cope. Whether you approach your Students’ Union for advice for yourself or a friend remember that anything you say is treated with the strictest confidence. Your SU is there for you, so make full use of the services they offer. leanonme.net leanonme.net
  5. 5. 8 9 Lean On Family & Friends Confiding in a family member or a close friend is important if you’re feeling down. Opening up to just one other person about how you are feeling can relieve much of the burden and make the problems seem far smaller than before. Your friends and family will do all they can to help you overcome depression, and once they are aware of it they will be more understanding when they notice the symptoms. Because a lot of people don’t really understand depression, carefully choose who you go to for help. The right person will be sensitive to your feelings and will know when to simply just be there and listen or when to offer slight encouragement by making suggestions to go to the cinema etc. Whereas others may try “tough love” and some may just laugh it off not knowing that these attitudes are hurtful and don’t help. If you would rather keep your troubles to yourself, there are plenty of independent, confidential supports available, including from your Students’ Union. Saying Lean On Me If your friend displays changes in their behaviour ranging from suddenly skipping lectures, neglecting personal hygiene and being moody or withdrawn, you may suspect that they are feeling depressed. Look out for any of the symptoms listed earlier as these could be warning signs that your friend is feeling down. If these factors seem to indicate that your friend is depressed, what should you do? Well a good place to start is to talk to your friend, even a general comment on how you’ve noticed that their mood seems to be low recently can encourage them to open up. If they how they have been feeling, remind them that depression is a medical condition, not a personal weakness or flaw that they should be ashamed about. If you feel that you are out of your depth or that your friend needs help, suggest that they speak to their GP or a counsellor. The Samaritans provide a helpline (1850 60 90 90) which could be more appealing to your friend as it is anonymous and may seem less intimidating. Giving your friend a nudge in the right direction just might make all the difference and could provide the encouragement they need to seek help. leanonme.net leanonme.net
  6. 6. 10 11 What if my friend doesn’t get help for their depression? If your friend doesn’t seek help, their symptoms could get much worse. The longer depression remains undiagnosed the harder it may be to treat and overcome. There is a clear link between depression and suicide. Suicidal feelings, thought, impulses or behaviours should always be taken seriously. If a friend expresses distressing emotions or thoughts of suicide, encourage them to seek help immediately - or do so on their behalf. This may be the first step in your friend’s recovery. Don’t neglect yourself Helping a friend with depression may leave you feeling tired, drained and emotional. Remember to look after yourself and talk to someone if you feel the need. What not to say Be careful in how you approach your friend if you suspect that they are depressed. Try to avoid doing the following: • Telling them to “snap out of it!” • Correcting viewpoints that you think are pessimistic or illogical • Persuading them that they aren’t actually depressed • Acting overly happy or making silly jokes Where to get help Help is available from your local GP, in college from the medical centre or from the supports provided by your Students’ Union. The Samaratins helpline (1850 60 90 90) is available to provide confidential emotional support for people who are experiencing feelings of distress or despair and may be an option for someone who wants to seek help outside of college. There is a list of many of the supports available (and their contact details) at the end of this booklet which you may find useful when helping your friend leanonme.net leanonme.net
  7. 7. 12 13 Drink, Drugs and, err... Rock'n'Roll? Alcohol Alcohol may improve your social confidence and mood in the short-term. However, prolonged use can cause or worsen depression. It has also been found that 16 – 24 year olds are the most likely to miss lectures or work due to alcohol consumption. If you feel that you should cut down on your consumption of alcohol, here are some helpful tips: • Be Realistic – There is no point in vowing to cut it out completely unless you are going to be able to stick to it • Spend more time with friends that don’t drink or that won’t pressure you into drinking • Not all activities involve drinking – you can pick up a social hobby (such as a sport that you like) or spend more time on your existing hobbies. You don’t need alcohol to have a good time - you can still socialise as much as ever without it. Abstaining completely isn’t a necessity for good mental health, but drinking in moderation is important. Your DotCom Bubble Social networking sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, make it easier than ever before to stay in touch with family and friends or keep up to date with the latest news and rumours as they happen. When students move away from home, feelings of isolation and homesickness are common, especially among first years that may be moving out for the first time. Social networking can help with this by keeping you connected with friends or relatives no matter where they are. Sometimes just reading about what your friends are up to can comfort you when you’re feeling down. But remember, college is full of new opportunities and it is a great chance to meet like-minded people and make new friends - so don’t spend all of your time staring at a computer screen, living in a dotcom bubble! “Facebook Depression” It is important to realise the negative effects of social media too. If someone is feeling low and experiencing symptoms of depression, reading about their friend's 'exciting' social lives can make them feel even worse and they may withdraw further. Online, everybody wants to appear to be popular and have a busy social life. Think about it – how often does somebody post a status such as: Had to stay in all weekend, absolutely broke… leanonme.net leanonme.net
  8. 8. 14 15 Substance Abuse Many students who seek help for depression also report symptoms of substance abuse. Figuring out whether depression leads to drug use, or if drug use leads to depression in a particular case, is often impossible but these two issues certainly have a strong link. It may seem that taking recreational drugs such as cannabis, ecstasy or cocaine before a night out is harmless, but these drugs have a major negative impact on your mental health over the long term. Don’t feel pressured into taking drugs by ‘friends’. There is also a link between depression, substance abuse and other conditions such as anxiety or eating disorders. Achieving Good Mental Health • Exercise! – going for walks, playing sports or hitting the gym all help to clear the mind and can make you feel more energetic. Don’t oversleep as it drains energy • Drop the internal commentary – stop criticising what you do wrong, praise what you do right • Open up – sharing feelings, good or bad, can have a positive effect • Get involved in college life – joining societies, sports clubs, meeting new people and learning new things can be stimulating and exciting • Improve your diet – Overeating, going for long periods without food and binge drinking can undermine good mental health and reduce energy levels • Spend more time with friends and family – whether it’s catching up with old friends or going to the cinema with new ones, this is a great way to take your mind of other matters and raise your spirits • Rest – don’t feel like you have to accept every invitation that comes your way. It is important to have some “me-time” every so often to pursue personal interests or just to give yourself a break. Ireland and Munster rugby legend Alan Quinlan supports the Lean On Me Campaign leanonme.net leanonme.net

×