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Virtual Reality- A Payor Opportunity
Assessment
Rick Krohn, M.A., M.A.S.
President HealthSense
rkrohn@healthsen.com
Virtual Reality is a century–old idea ……..
…that has evolved from a mass market entertainment medium
to a personalized, immersive class of technologies
VR describes several related technologies
Virtual reality (“VR”) is an artificial environment created with software and pr...
VR market snapshot
Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster has dubbed VR and AR “the next technology megatrend” with “the
poten...
In healthcare, the tools and technologies of VR have
evolved…..
February 1925 cover of Science and Invention magazine
…and the enabling devices have gotten better, too
Source: Health –e Everything: Wearables and the IoT for Healthcare, Krohn and Metcalf, Editors
-VR most effective as a tra...
…but in other verticals it’s still early days – VR development is
still largely in the pilot and boutique solution stage. ...
A short video that demonstrates the value of AR as a training and
“Guidance System” in the ER…..click on image
VA and DoD are leading development of VR and AR
healthcare apps
• Training and Education – field medicine
• PTSD
• Rehabil...
Cleveland Clinic VR
Parkinson’s Disease
… some Enterprise VR Deployments
St. Jude’s Children's Research Hospital
Cigna Virtual Relaxation Pod™, an
innovative 3D meditative
experience
…and some Payor Deployments
Disney’s Habit Heroes (s...
Who are the leading players in Healthcare VR?
Whether the clinician is in the operating room or providing emergency care, ...
VR Opportunities in the Payor Space
• Potential cost savings and quality gains can be captured across multiple verticals –...
There are, of course, hurdles to VR/AR Adoption in
Healthcare
• Infrastructure, Integration and Gadget cost
• New technolo...
Strategizing VR in the Payor space
• Multiple Benefits: VR not only leverages market trends like population health,
consum...
VR Innovation – Trends
• Blending of VR and AR products
• Commoditization and retail availability of VR tools, devices and...
Acknowledgements
David Metcalf, Ph.D. , Director, Mixed Emerging Technology Integration Lab,
University of Central Florida...
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Vr opportunity assessment

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Virtual relatiy market assessment with focus on Payors

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Vr opportunity assessment

  1. 1. Virtual Reality- A Payor Opportunity Assessment Rick Krohn, M.A., M.A.S. President HealthSense rkrohn@healthsen.com
  2. 2. Virtual Reality is a century–old idea ……..
  3. 3. …that has evolved from a mass market entertainment medium to a personalized, immersive class of technologies
  4. 4. VR describes several related technologies Virtual reality (“VR”) is an artificial environment created with software and presented to the user in such a way that the user suspends belief and accepts it as a real environment. In a digital environment, VR is primarily experienced through two of the five senses: sight and sound. Virtual reality can be divided into: the simulation of a real environment for training and education; and the development of an imagined environment for a game or interactive story. (http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/virtual-reality) Augmented reality (“AR”) is the integration of digital information with the live video of the user's environment in real time. AR takes an existing visual digital feed and blends new information to create an augmented environment. Medical AR takes its main motivation from the need of visualizing medical data and the patient within the same physical space. (http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/augmented-reality-AR) [While VR aims at immersing the user into a computer generated virtual world, AR takes a different approach, in which virtual computer generated objects are added to the real physical space.] Real 3D displays an image in three dimensions. This is a significant difference from stereoscopic displays, which display only two offset images and use the observer’s head and eye movement to “fill in” for the more limited amount of data present. Real Holographic differs from 3D in that it has the ability to display binocular disparity, motion parallax, accommodation and convergence.
  5. 5. VR market snapshot Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster has dubbed VR and AR “the next technology megatrend” with “the potential to make every computer and entertainment interface disappear.” According to DigiTrends, the addressable market will surpass $90 Billion in 2020. Healthcare has not been a headliner for VR investment…. …but that will change, according to Goldman Sachs. Healthcare VR applications are forecast to top $5.1 billion in sales by 2025, with 3.4 million active users, including 1.5 million medical professionals.
  6. 6. In healthcare, the tools and technologies of VR have evolved….. February 1925 cover of Science and Invention magazine
  7. 7. …and the enabling devices have gotten better, too
  8. 8. Source: Health –e Everything: Wearables and the IoT for Healthcare, Krohn and Metcalf, Editors -VR most effective as a training and education tool -AR effective in the ER, OR as 3D imagery, simulation and heads up display with checklists that improve outcomes Notably, VR is Getting traction in the healthcare enterprise
  9. 9. …but in other verticals it’s still early days – VR development is still largely in the pilot and boutique solution stage. Industry- wide, it’s a green field for innovation. VR in the Physician Office Behavior change Virtual diagnosis Education and Prevention VR in Pharma PTSD Rehabilitation Pain management Behavioral health (ex. pain management, drug efficacy) VR/AR applications for patients and consumers Immersive health/wellness Gamification Brain injuries Behavioral health (ex. anxiety, body image, phobia) Chronic disease management
  10. 10. A short video that demonstrates the value of AR as a training and “Guidance System” in the ER…..click on image
  11. 11. VA and DoD are leading development of VR and AR healthcare apps • Training and Education – field medicine • PTSD • Rehabilitation • Pain management • Behavioral health
  12. 12. Cleveland Clinic VR Parkinson’s Disease … some Enterprise VR Deployments St. Jude’s Children's Research Hospital
  13. 13. Cigna Virtual Relaxation Pod™, an innovative 3D meditative experience …and some Payor Deployments Disney’s Habit Heroes (sponsored by Florida Blue, Anthem), the EPCOT exhibit was built around educating guests about kicking some unhealthy habits, and improving health and fitness.
  14. 14. Who are the leading players in Healthcare VR? Whether the clinician is in the operating room or providing emergency care, having quick, contamination-free access to vitals and medical records without turning away from the patient helps increase quality of care. Doctors and nurses can view medical data from a wide range of monitoring devices, on the go, helping them properly respond to any medical situation. Oculus (acquired by Facebook) radically redefines digital entertainment. Immerse yourself in games or go inside your favorite movies. Time travel, space travel, or hang out with friends in VR. Endless worlds await. ($600) Magic Leap is developing the next computing platform that will enable you to seamlessly combine and experience your digital and physical lives. The IMMY iC 60 is a complete AR/VR experience in a single ($1,500) device. …it’s cardboard
  15. 15. VR Opportunities in the Payor Space • Potential cost savings and quality gains can be captured across multiple verticals – health system, providers, pharma, consumer. • Clinical opportunities to impact cost and quality include provider and patient education, best practices, wellness and prevention, behavioral health, chronic disease management, rehabilitation, drug therapy. • Clinical opportunities to introduce VR replacement therapies that are personal, engaging, on- demand, clinically and cost effective. • Business opportunities to drive member enrollment and retention, member satisfaction, sales support, promotions, alliances, networks. • Cross-industry co-branding and co-marketing: some examples • Brain injury – NFL • Aging in place- AARP • Behavioral health - Facebook • The Customer – engaging the member base: • Retail solutions (Gear, etc.), are inexpensive, apps can be quickly developed • Consumers enjoy immersive experiences • Gamification and incentives • Unique outreach, compliance and education tools for high cost members
  16. 16. There are, of course, hurdles to VR/AR Adoption in Healthcare • Infrastructure, Integration and Gadget cost • New technology aversion – VR is a young technology not easily deployed in enterprise environments (but has shown effectiveness in ER, OR and with field staff to drive better outcomes). • Creating a truly engaging augmented reality experience in a practical, consumer- ready device. • User experience (disorientation, motion sickness) • Initial training on 3D environment degrades experience • Privacy, compliance • Pushback from doctors unaccustomed to retail solutions - Why should providers care? (managing risk, education, outreach, outcomes, chronic disease management, compliance).
  17. 17. Strategizing VR in the Payor space • Multiple Benefits: VR not only leverages market trends like population health, consumerization, value, risk management and personalized care, it positions Payors to avoid disintermediation and cement provider and member relationships. • Payors can “Tier” VR solutions. Ex. • Tier one: low cost/high yield (education, wellness, prevention) • Tier two: high cost/high yield (rehab, best practices) • From Clinical Education to Marketing, technology isn’t the centerpiece of the VR solution – the message or the story is. • Architect Technology to immersive experience and delivery capabilities (i.e. mobile). • Mitigate cost, development and adoption through partnerships and affordable-device enablement. • Leverage proven techniques to incent viewer – gamification, social media, narrative, visioning, goal setting, and rewards. • Know the customer - younger gens, millennials will be more receptive, comfortable with virtual worlds. • Gain internal buy-in with early wins: (ex. childhood obesity, replacement drug therapy, smoking cessation). • The usual disclaimers apply: privacy and security, access, validation.
  18. 18. VR Innovation – Trends • Blending of VR and AR products • Commoditization and retail availability of VR tools, devices and solutions • Increasingly immersive – from passive viewing to active engagement • Granular range of apps, better resolution, heightened expectations for creative content • Form factor – lighter, more comfortable, less scary • Gaming industry will provide substrate for NextGen VR - from VR experience to VR environments – ex. The Void
  19. 19. Acknowledgements David Metcalf, Ph.D. , Director, Mixed Emerging Technology Integration Lab, University of Central Florida Institute for Simulation and Training Paul Szotek, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery Indiana University Health

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