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Patterson ch07

Patterson ch07

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Patterson ch07

  1. 1. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 7
  2. 2. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-2 Voter Participation Expansion of the vote Initially only white property-owning men could vote By the 1840s most property restrictions were removed Fifteenth Amendment (1870) gave African Americans the right to vote  Suppressed by literacy laws and other methods  Voting rights not fully available until the 1960s Women received the vote in 1920 via the Twentieth Amendment Eighteen-year-olds received the vote in 1971 via the Twenty-Sixth Amendment
  3. 3. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-3 Voter Participation Factors in voter turnout: the United States in comparative perspective Significantly lower turnout than in European democracies Registration requirements  Historically a means to limit suffrage  Determined by states  Motor voter law
  4. 4. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-4
  5. 5. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-5
  6. 6. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-6 Voter Participation Factors in voter turnout: the United States in comparative perspective Registration requirements  Voter ID cards serve to depress voter turnout  Georgia photo ID/voter identification card law Federal judge struck down monetary requirement  Supreme Court upheld Indiana voter ID card requirement
  7. 7. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-7 Voter Participation Factors in voter turnout: the United States in comparative perspective Frequency of elections  Elections at many levels of government, frequent and staggered  Primary elections  Americans asked to vote two or three times as often as Europeans
  8. 8. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-8 Voter Participation Why some Americans vote and others do not Education and income Age Civic attitudes  Apathy  Alienation  Civic duty Political interest and party identification
  9. 9. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-9
  10. 10. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-10
  11. 11. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-11 Conventional Forms of Participation Other Than Voting Campaign and lobbying activities Virtual participation Political campaigns and citizen mobilization Democratizing effects, but also lend themselves to political polarization Community activities Decline in social capital?
  12. 12. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-12
  13. 13. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-13
  14. 14. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-14 Unconventional Activism: Social Movements and Protest Politics Protest more common in the predemocratic era Social and political movements use conventional forms of political participation: lobbying, voting, writing letters They also can use unconventional means: protests Civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s Vietnam War protests in the 1960s and 1970s
  15. 15. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-15 Unconventional Activism: Social Movements and Protest Politics The Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street protest movements Each social (political) movement started with anger at established interests Tea Party:  Initial target: Republican lawmakers for the 2008 bank bailout  Played a key role in Republican takeover of House in 2010  Resulting House turmoil has weakened popular support
  16. 16. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-16 Unconventional Activism: Social Movements and Protest Politics The Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street protest movements Occupy Wall Street:  Began as protest against bailout of the financial industry and government’s failure to hold bankers accountable  Has seen popular support decline because of public’s unease with protesters confronting police  OWS’s target was private wealth and it aimed to curb the political influence of large political donors
  17. 17. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-17 Unconventional Activism: Social Movements and Protest Politics The public’s response to protest activity Political protests have a long history in America Americans less likely to protest than citizens in other democracies Public support for protest activity relatively low
  18. 18. © 2015 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-18 Participation and Potential for Influence Individualism diminishes political participation Lower-income Americans least likely to vote or participate politically; lack resources and education levels Participation reflects socioeconomic level

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