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Design Research: How to frame the right questions for your design process

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Great design comes from good decisions and excellent execution. 
Design Research informs those Design Decisions.
What we think we know… is it actually valid? or is just a collection of stereotypes and prejudices? What do we really need to know? Who can we get that information from? How can we get it without contaminating the sample?
This presentation introduces the essential techniques that answer these questions, that need to be addressed along the Design process. 

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Design Research: How to frame the right questions for your design process

  1. 1. How to frame the right questions
 for your design process Santiago Bustelo February 9, 2017
 Lamar University, Houston, Texas DESIGN RESEARCH This presentation is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license
  2. 2. SANTIAGO BUSTELO Santiago is UX Director at Kambrica, a User Experience consultancy based in Buenos Aires. He chairs the local chapter of the Interaction Design Association (IxDA BA) and served as the first IxDA Regional Coordinator for Latin America. Santiago had his first contact with interaction design in 1996 – designing business simulations. Since then, he has participated in design and development projects for Argentina, Chile, Spain, the United States and England. Santiago holds a degree in Graphic Design from the University of Buenos Aires, where he also started his design teaching career. Since 2001, he has given presentations and workshops on UX, Usability, Interaction Design and Design Professionalism in three continents.
  3. 3. User Experience Design Interaction Design Industrial Design Human Computer Interaction Usability Engineering Ubiquitous Computing Interactive Controls Mechanical Engineering Electrical Engineering Psychology Cognitive Science Sociolo Philosophy Human Factors & Ergonomics Architecture Information Architecture Communication Design Motion Design Spatial Experience Contextual Requirements Data & Info Visualization Functional Requirements Generative Design Marketing Audio Engineering Sound Design Writing Computer Science Interactive Environments User Interface DesignApplication Design Software Development Navigation Design Guidance Systems User Interface Scenography Scenario Design Digital Signage Media Installations USER EXPERIENCE (ISO 9241-210:2010) • Person’s perceptions and responses resulting from the use and/or anticipated use of a product, system or service. • User experience includes all the users' emotions, beliefs, preferences, perceptions, physical and psychological responses, behaviours and accomplishments that occur before, during and after use. • User experience is a consequence of brand image, presentation, functionality, system performance, interactive behaviour and assistive capabilities of the interactive system, the user's internal and physical state resulting from prior experiences, attitudes, skills and personality, and the context of use. • Usability, when interpreted from the perspective of the users' personal goals, can include the kind of perceptual and emotional aspects typically associated with user experience. Usability criteria can be used to assess aspects of user experience. Dan Saffer: The Disciplines of User Experience
  4. 4. kambrica.com • DESIGN RESEARCH IS NOT ABOUT ASKING OTHERS WHAT TO DO 4
  5. 5. kambrica.com • DESIGN RESEARCH IS NOT ABOUT REQUIREMENTS GATHERING 5
  6. 6. kambrica.com • DESIGN IS NOT ABOUT REQUIREMENTS 
 6
  7. 7. kambrica.com • DESIGN IS ABOUT
 OBJECTIVES
 7
  8. 8. kambrica.com • OBJECTIVES
 REQUIREMENTS • Why are we doing this project? • Focus on problems to solve, not functionalities or solutions. • Frame design decisions. • What are we going to do?
 • Describe visible features or attributes of a proposed solution. • Frame design execution. 8
  9. 9. IF WE ASK CLIENTS FOR DESIGN REQUIREMENTS… Maurizio Pesce, Elon Musk, Tesla Factory in Fremont - CC BY 2.0 I’m starting a luxury car company… I’d like a classic logo… Something like Mercedes…
  10. 10. kambrica.com • …THEY MAY GET JUST WHAT THEY ASKED FOR 10 Musk Motors Re: Logo Hi Elon, Here is the logo based in your specifications. I’ll send you the invoice in a separate email. xoxo
  11. 11. DESIGN REQUIREMENTS: OUTCOME OF A DESIGN PROCESS Reid Parham, Giraffe Project Standards Manual - CC BY-SA 3.0
  12. 12. kambrica.com • OBJECTIVES FRAME DESIGN DECISIONS 12
  13. 13. kambrica.com • DESIGN RESEARCH INFORMS DESIGN DECISIONS 13
  14. 14. kambrica.com • ITERATIVE DESIGN PROCESS BECAUSE DESIGN DECISIONS ALWAYS OPEN NEW QUESTIONS 14 Ideas ProductData EXECUTE RESEARCH IDEATE,
 DECIDE
  15. 15. kambrica.com • DIMENSIONS OF DESIGN RESEARCH METHODS 15 Behavioral What people do Attitudinal What people say Qualitative What, why & How to fix Quantitative How many &
 How much Not using the product or service Natural use Context of Product Use Scripted use Christian Rohrer:
 When to Use Which User-Experience Research Methods
  16. 16. kambrica.com • RESEARCH TOPICS:
 WHAT DO WE NEED TO KNOW? Known knowns validate
 Known unknowns investigate
 Unknown unknowns explore 16
  17. 17. kambrica.com • RESEARCH SUBJECTS:
 WHO CAN WE GET INFORMATION FROM? Client & stakeholders (interested in the project’s outcome) • Client: project objectives, brand values & aspirations (always needed!) • High level positions: brand/org values & aspirations • Personnel: experiences with users / customers, actual enacted values • Stakeholders’s needs Competition • Offerings • Established design language
 Target audiences & users (segments*) • Those who don’t know the brand • Those aware of the brand • Aware & interested • First-time users • Regular users • Passionate users • Extreme users • Domain experts (may not be users) (*) You may or not be able to segment your sample before interviewing.
 Some times you would end knowing which group people belongs to, after interviewing them. 17
  18. 18. kambrica.com • INFORMED DECISIONS ON EACH ITERATION
 VS. GROWLING GUT-FEELING 1. Manage expectations (your client’s, and yours) • Downgrade every “known” from certainty/requirement, to assumptions/hypothesis. • Assume that the results will challenge established beliefs. In the end, that’s why we are doing research: because we know we don’t have the ultimate truth! 2. Plan and document (write down): what are the objectives, known knowns & known unknowns? What do we want to achieve? How will we know if we succeeded? What do we want to learn or validate? 3. If applicable, create the prototype(s) needed to get feedback on. 4. Get information as objective and unbiased as possible. 5. Evaluate if the information is valid, or if you should go one or more steps back. • It is OK to rationally decide not to take some gathered information into account. 
 E.g. attending a discovered issue may fall out of the project’s scope or the client’s allocated budget. • Remember that it’s always difficult to move away from beliefs challenged by research results. • Something may not “sound right” at the time, regardless of if it’s valid or not. If your gut feeling (or the client’s) growls before evidence, it’s better to take some time to digest the information. • You or your client may be tempted to invalidate the research (contest the sample, methodology, etc), in an attempt to hold on to challenged beliefs. Refine the sample or methodology, and try again. 6. Decide how to act upon the insights (what the information tells you). • Turn insights into design decisions. 18
  19. 19. CASE: TRAFFIC SAFETY IN ALBERTA, CANADA Problem: traffic-related injuries and fatalities Objective: behavioral change Questions: • Who needs to change a risky behavior? • Which behavior is that? • How can we make this target population consider this behavioral change? Design research: • Qualitative research • Quantitative research Design decisions: • Focus the communication on the harm people can do others, while feeling omnipotent behind the wheel. Jorge Frascara (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1939). Professor Emeritus at the University of Alberta, advisor to the ISO (International Standards Organization). Frascara, Jorge, Finn, Adam, Jenzen, Henri L., Paterson, John G. and Strickler-Wilson, Zoe (1992) Traffic Safety in Alberta/ Casualty Collision and the 18-24 Year Old Male Driver: Criteria for a Targeted Communication Campaign, Edmonton: Alberta Motor Association/Alberta Solicitor General.
  20. 20. NORTHERN IRELAND'S DOE ROAD SAFETY • Those most at risk of causing speed- related deaths and serious injuries are 17-24 year old males, followed by males 25-34 years old. • Research found that drivers tend to blame unexpected events rather than their own behaviour in the aftermath of road accidents. • The fear of killing a child was one of the few factors that could influence drivers to cut their speed. Daily Mail: The road safety advert so shocking it's been banned from screens until after 9pm
  21. 21. TECHNIQUE #1: GATHERING
 AVAILABLE DATA
  22. 22. kambrica.com • SOURCES • Public data (e.g. available to Google) • Design language • Competitors • History, symbols… • Comments on customer’s website • Blogs, Social Media (e.g. search for brand’s name) • Private data • Emails, Call Center (recordings / attending) • Analytics 22
  23. 23. kambrica.com • FROM GATHERING DATA TO
 PRODUCING INSIGHTS 25 Data Connectedness Understanding Information Knowledge Wisdom Understanding
 relations Understanding
 patterns Understanding
 principles Gene Bellinger, Durval Castro, Anthony Mills: Data, Information, Knowledge, and Wisdom
  24. 24. kambrica.com • ORGANIZE, MAP, LOOK FOR PATTERNS 26 National flag National identity Other / Abstract Flying
  25. 25. kambrica.com • DESIGN RESEARCH DELIVERABLES INVOLVE THE CLIENT IN DESIGN DECISIONS 27
  26. 26. kambrica.com • DESIGN RESEARCH DELIVERABLES INVOLVE THE CLIENT IN THE DESIGN PROCESS 28
  27. 27. TECHNIQUE #2: INTERVIEWING
  28. 28. USERS ARE NOT LAB RATS X Photo: National Chiao Tung University
  29. 29. kambrica.com • INTERVIEWING RULE #1 DON’T MAKE INTERVIEWEES THINK OF AN ELEPHANT 31
  30. 30. kambrica.com • STEPS 1. Planning. What do we want to validate/investigate/explore (topics)?
 Sample questions. 2. Dress up & attitude. 3. Recruit or approach. Break ice, ask for permission to record or take notes. 4. Conduct interview. Open questions, active listening, don’t judge the subjects, make everything add up. Record or take notes unobtrusively (with permission). 5. After the interview, dump & check notes before the memories of the conversation evaporates. Take notes of any emerging “hot” conclusions, patterns, insights and new hypothesis. 6. Rinse and repeat. Adjust the sample, questions, etc if necessary. 7. Organize, look for patterns, produce insights. 32
  31. 31. kambrica.com • START PRACTICING WITH… First steps • Friends & family • Other students (not your friends – yet?) Getting serious • Client’s staff (you will have good excuses / openers) • People used to be approached on a daily basis, e.g. clerks and waiters • Random strangers (intercept interviews) 33
  32. 32. QUALITATIVE INTERVIEWS
  33. 33. CONTEXTUAL INQUIRY
  34. 34. Jake is a market- ing man- ager for a medium sized univer- sity. He’s been at his job for 3 years now and has been tasked with a complete overhaul of the university’s student- facing web sites. He’s got a general idea of his budget and a pretty good idea of what serv- ices he needs as well as what re- sources he has in house. His project has been pretty well scoped, however, he still has ques- tions and is looking for a full service vendor who can help direct the proc- ess as well as do the work. Web Savvy - 7 out of 10 Jake is our primary“Looking for Serv- ices”user. He’s typical of the folks that turn to the RFP process when looking for services. However, he is also educated and web savvy enough to look for a smarter, less time con- suming alternative. Goals: - Find the right vendor for his project in as easy a way as possible. - Get his process questions answered. Mike is a project manager and ac- count rep. for a 12 person interac- tion design firm. He’s responsibili include managing projects, dealin with existing clients, leading mark ing efforts, sales and much more. He often doesn’t have time to exp new work and the traditional RFP process is simply too much work. company is doing fairly well, so of a“difficult”sale will be tossed asid regardless of how great the job would be--if the process to land th job is to cumbersome. Web Savvy - 8 out of 10 Mike represents the primary vend persona. His goals would be cutti down on time spent doing biz de and bringing in clients who are a ter“fit”for he and his team. Goals: - Cut down on time spent on biz d - Connect with the right clients an projects. - Educate potential clients about h services. - Never look at an RFP again. Jake Mike Deliverable PERSONAS Synthesis of research to illustrate the “face” of a user / target audience.
 The true value in personas is the research that helps build empathy. • Relatively easy to read and understand by just about anyone. • Focus on relevant information to the project as user’s goals, activities and expectations – not personal details. • Cons / risks: Good data is often watered down by useless detail. Can be distracting as they tend to be haggled over. Don’t usually leave room for edge cases. D. Keith Robinson: Making The Translation, Critical Web App Design Deliverables
  35. 35. kambrica.com • SOME MUSEUM USERS… 37 Photo: 12 Steps: UX Design for a Museum Exhibition
  36. 36. TECHNIQUE #3: MAPPING
  37. 37. MAPPING • Visual arrangement: dump & organize data. • Two or more dimensions: X/Y, columns, areas (e.g. venn diagrams), colors, stacks (e.g. group synonyms). • Allows both individual & group activities – without falling into groupthink. • Example: KJ-Technique (affinity diagram workshop) IxDA Local Leaders Workshop, Interaction 14
  38. 38. CARD SORTING SESSION
  39. 39. IMPROMPTU MAPPING
  40. 40. CASE DESIGN RESEARCH ALONG THE DESIGN PROCESS: DESIGN FOR DECISIONS
  41. 41. kambrica.com • CASE OSPIC (Film Industry Union Healthcare) 43
  42. 42. kambrica.com • OBJECTIVES WE HELPED THE CLIENT DEFINE (INTERVIEWS, MAPPING) Objectives • Convey professionalism. • Attract new affiliates, either from or outside the Union. 44 Before redesign
  43. 43. kambrica.com • FIRST RESEARCH: INTERVIEWS • Client (President of the Organization) • Middle management in direct contact with affiliates & prospects. • Affiliates: mental model, perceived brand (experience).
 What’s good, what’s bad, what’s ugly? • Prospects: mental model, perceived brand (expectations).
 Why are they moving away from their current provider? Why are they considering offerings? What brought them to consider this particular offering? • Prospects: validation information and insights obtained with Client & Middle Management. 45
  44. 44. kambrica.com • REFINED OBJECTIVES AGREED WITH THE CLIENT AFTER FIRST RESEARCH INSIGHTS Objectives • Convey professionalism. • Make the Union & affiliates proud of belonging. • Attract new affiliates, either from or outside the Union. Strategy / Refined objectives: • Movie Industry as identity & selling point. • Move away from old union-centric communication style, mindset & identity. • Focus on health care quality: new deals with top-level health centers. • Focus on reducing bureaucracy: service redesign, communication centered in user’s needs. • Position OSPIC as a serious while affordable healthcare for middle class workers, on par with private offerings. 46
  45. 45. kambrica.com • RESEARCH: DESIGN LANGUAGE • Containment: Circles, circular arrangement of elements, or elements containing or supporting another. • Reliability: “solid” typography. The brand is big & legible. • Health: use of symbols such as cross, heart… Key insight for design direction (agreed with the Client): OSPIC logo should have a clear reference to Health, to avoid competing with the identity of the Union. 47
  46. 46. kambrica.com • FIRST DESIGN PROTOTYPES • High level execution (“rough around the edges”). • Execution in this phase is aimed to explore concepts, and pros & cons from each one. • Ensure the execution will be better & more detailed on time. • Design for decisions. • Be fair with each concept. Don’t fall in love with any option. • “May be interpreted as…” are signals, not definitions: further research would show if that concern is actually valid. • Show, don’t tell. • Let each concept stand on its own. • Show the client’s ideas first. • If we believe something is not going to work, show it to support the case. • Execution should be sufficient to avoid blaming concept limitations on the execution level. 48
  47. 47. kambrica.com • PROPOSAL 1: FILMING • Pros: • Reference to Movie industry. • Compact. • Cons: • No reference to health care. • Could be interpreted as a person filming in solitary, instead of coordinated workers. • Too complex for small sizes, too many elements (person, camera). 49 OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC
  48. 48. kambrica.com • PROPOSAL 2: BOOM MICROPHONE ON SET • Pros: • Reference to Movie industry. • Boom could refer to a filming situation. • Cons: • No reference to health care. • Boom could be interpreted not as “universal” as a camera for the industry. Could be interpreted as referring only to sound operators? • The boom figure, needed both big and small elements (mic vs. pole) to be recognized, may be troubling for reductions. 50 OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA
  49. 49. kambrica.com • PROPOSAL 3: CLAPBOARD • Pros: • Clear reference to Movie industry. • Contras: • No reference to health care. • Trite, which doesn’t help to a professional image. • Further synthesis to avoid dullness, also makes the symbol difficult to recognize. 51 OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA
  50. 50. kambrica.com • PROPOSAL 4: MOVIE REEL • Pros: • Reference to Movie industry. • Reference to health care, in a very far second place. • Can be seen as an evolution from current isologo. • Cons: • It could be difficult to see either the cross or the reel. • Adding elements to highlight the cross or connote “union”, makes the reel impossible to recognize. 52 OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC
  51. 51. kambrica.com • PROPOSAL 5. LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! • Pros: • Reference to Movie industry. • Reference to health care. • Cons: • It could be difficult to see the Lighting Equipment. • Chosen symbol could be interpreted not as “universal” as a camera for the industry.
 Could be interpreted as referring only to lighting operators? 53 OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC OSPIC OSPIC
  52. 52. kambrica.com • RESEARCH: VALIDATE ASSUMPTIONS, TEST PERCEIVED RISKS • Client (President of the Organization) • Middle management in direct contact with affiliates & prospects. • Affiliates. After this research, a winner was chosen for the next design phase. 54
  53. 53. kambrica.com • DESIGN EXPLORATION: SHAPE 55 < Más parecido a una cruz Más parecido a un farol > 1 2 543 6
  54. 54. kambrica.com • DESIGN EXPLORATION: COMPLEXITY 56 1-B 1-C 1-D 1-E 1-F 1-A
  55. 55. kambrica.com • DESIGN EXPLORATION: TYPOGRAPHY 57 kambrica.com • Opción 1 16 OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC kambrica.com • Opción 2 17 OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OSPIC kambrica.com • Opción 6 21 OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA kambrica.com • Opción 7 22 OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA
  56. 56. kambrica.com • RESEARCH: COLOR PALETTE 58
  57. 57. kambrica.com • RESEARCH: COLOR PALETTE 59
  58. 58. kambrica.com • RESEARCH: COLOR PALETTE 60
  59. 59. kambrica.com • 61 OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA A B C D E F 1 2 3 4
  60. 60. kambrica.com • 62 OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA OBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA 1 2 3 4
  61. 61. kambrica.com • FINAL VERSION 63 LOGO OSPIC / Paleta de color PANTONE 7461 C C: 95 M: 41 Y: 6 K: 0 R: 0 G: 124 B: 186 Web: #007CBA PANTONE 541 C C: 100 M: 78 Y: 32 K: 21 R: 0 G: 59 B: 113 Web: #003B70 PALETA DE COLOR OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA
  62. 62. kambrica.com • APPLICATIONS 64 320077 88 APELLIDO Y NOMBRE 00/00/0000PLAN VTO.000 URGENCIAS: 4000 8888 / 4556 4556 / 0810 333 8888 Esta credencial es personal e intranferible para uso exclusivo del titular y deberá presentarse con el documento de identidad. En caso de extravío se solicita remitirla a nuestra oficina más próxima. Superintendencia de Salud Órgano de Control 0 800 222 SALUD (72583) - www.sssalud.gov.ar Juncal 2029 - Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires Tel: 4808-0106 / 0800 555 0899 / 0800 888 7060 Las Obras Sociales no son una empresa de medicina prepaga ni son un “beneficio” otorgado por la patronal. Las Obras Sociales son una conquista de los trabajadores organizados. Bienvenidos a OSPIC O S P I C • O B R A S O C I A L D E L P E R S O N A L D E L A I N D U S T R I A C I N E M AT O G R Á F I C A ¿Cómo funciona OSPIC? ¿Qué es una Obra Social Solidaria? ¿Qué porcentaje de mi salario aporto a OSPIC? Cartilla Médica 2016 Ciudad y Gran Buenos Aires RNOS 10450-4
  63. 63. kambrica.com • Objectives ✔ Convey professionalism. ✔ Make the Union & affiliates proud. ✔ Attract new affiliates, either from or outside the Union. LOGO OSPIC / Paleta de color PALETA OSPICOBRA SOCIAL DEL PERSONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA CINEMATOGRÁFICA RESULTS 65 Before After
  64. 64. kambrica.com • RECOMMENDED READINGS 66 RECOMMENDED READINGS
  65. 65. THANKS! Design Research: How to frame the right questions for your design process Santiago Bustelo February 9, 2017 • Lamar University, Houston, Texas

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