eLearning Staff
Grant Sherson
• Team Leader - Education Technology Unit
Kevin Brennan
• eLearning Advisor & Developer
Kay ...
Session Overview
Date Topic
31 October Choosing your approach to eLearning
7 November
Analysis (students, content, resourc...
Free & Easy
First Line
Management
??
Most UCOL
Classes
Grad Cert in
Applied
eLearning
High embedded instructional design
High student completion
Teacher managed pathway
Student needs to be self motivated
High...
One view of levels of eLearning
Learning Objects – simulations and interactive
multimedia
Two-Way Communications – bulleti...
Development steps for building
eLearning resources - ADDIE.
Source: http://www.epsilonlearning.com/focus.htm
See also Inst...
Analysis
Existing Approach
What ‘works’?
What do students struggle with?
What do students ‘get’ easily?
Existing Approach
...
• Example of Process
– Source:
http://connect.educause.edu/Library/Abstract/Cr
eatinganOnlineCourseDev/45364?
time=1223342...
Gap analysis
• Essentially a gap is the space between where
you are and where you want to be. A 'gap' can
be thought of as...
Source: http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/resources/Teaching/CourseDesign/Objectives/BloomsTaxonomyVerbs.pdf
Category Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis higher order Synthesis higher order Evaluation higher order
Descript...
The Problem
• Poorly-designed materials can fail to engage
the learner, can be poorly understood, can
overload the learner...
The Process
• When embarking on learning design, we
suggest educators think first about what the
learner has to be able to...
Repeating and sequencing activities
Choosing priorities
• As designers of eLearning experiences, less is
often more. Find the elusive 20% of the
learner’s tim...
Planning Activities
Adding emotion
Adding Relationship
• learning programs that engage the learner
directly by using first and second person
language yield b...
Group Activities
• “Including collaborative activity in an online
course is probably the best way to tap into all
learning...
Activities in context
• Whenever possible, we recommend that
activities should be developed in contexts that
refer to the ...
Activities in context (cont)
• We recommend thinking about adding fun,
drama or controversy to get your adult
learners hoo...
eLearning introduction
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

eLearning introduction

184 vues

Publié le

Introduction to eLearning

Publié dans : Formation
0 commentaire
0 j’aime
Statistiques
Remarques
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Aucun téléchargement
Vues
Nombre de vues
184
Sur SlideShare
0
Issues des intégrations
0
Intégrations
2
Actions
Partages
0
Téléchargements
2
Commentaires
0
J’aime
0
Intégrations 0
Aucune incorporation

Aucune remarque pour cette diapositive
  • Grant Sherson
    Team Leader - Education Technology Unit - UCOL
    Responsibility to monitor and advise on the use of ICT at UCOL.
    Grant is a trained teacher with eight years primary teaching experience and a further twenty years in management, development and consultancy positions relating to technology in education.
    He has written and published education based computer software and has experience with computer based animation, interactive multimedia, digital video and resources for web based course delivery. He has been heavily involved in adult teaching including lecturing at Victoria University and providing technology based staff development at UCOL for fourteen years.
    Grant has a BA degree from Auckland University and a Master of Communications from Victoria University.
    Grant is currently working in the Education Technology Unit at the UCOL. His role involves the support for the use of technology in education, Blackboard administration and advising on eLearning.
    He is the course tutor for two online papers in the Graduate Certificate in Applied eLearning course (Producing eLearning Solutions and Technical Appreciation of eLearning Tools).
     
    Kevin Brennan
    eLearning Advisor & Developer - UCOL
    Kevin has recently arrived from the UK where he taught Food Science and related subjects in tertiary colleges for 14 years. He graduated from Lancaster University with a degree in Food Manufacturing Management and completed his MSc in Food Safety Management at the University of Central Lancashire.
    Before joining  UCOL, Kevin taught Food Safety, English and Mathematics and was the Information and Learning Technologies (ILT) Staff Trainer at Blackpool and The Fylde College in the UK. In addition to his role as Staff Trainer, Kevin acted as a Curriculum Consultant for JISC (the Joint Information Systems Committee). A key focus of this work was developing and evaluating new technologies for learning, teaching and student support.
    Kevin’s role involves advising on, and developing, eLearning for staff at UCOL. He runs various sessions designed to enable teachers to more effectively integrate eLearning into their courses.
     
    Kay Lewis
    Senior Lecturer, eLearning Advisor & Developer, Faculty of Humanities & Business - UCOL.  
    Diploma in Holistic Education (Honours); Buzan Licensed Instructor in Mind Mapping;  BEd (Adult Education), currently completing 4th paper towards Grad Cert in Applied eLearning with eMIT.
  • These are the sessions we will be working through this year.
    Today’s session looks at the Analysis project.
  • Revision
    Looking at the courses that are high touch (high tutor relationship with students) vs low touch and face to face vs online.
  • There is more in common with high touch face to face and high touch online than there is between high touch face to face and low touch face to face.
    The problem is that there is a belief that you can take a high touch face to face course and deliver it as a low touch online course. This does not work in most cases.
  • [Talk through the different levels listed]
  • There are different process models for building eLearning materials. We are choosing to focus on the ADDIE model.
    ADDIE
    Analysis
    Design
    Development
    Implementation
    Evaluation
     
    8 Steps
    http://www.icvet.tafensw.edu.au/resources/documents/eightsteps.pdf
     
    Te hikoi mātauranga (the learning journey)
    http://elearning.itpnz.ac.nz/elp_modules/Module4/index.html
     
    establish your goals
    design your activities
    develop your resources
    facilitate the experience
    evaluate the experience.
     
    The Nga Kiwai Kete model
    http://www.nkk.org.nz/kete3.php?id=95
    1 Outcomes Whainga 2 Assessment Aromatawai 3 Learners Akonga 4 Activities Mahi 5 Resources Rauemi 6 Guidance Arataki  
    http://www.nkk.org.nz/kete3.php
     
    OTARA
     http://www.efest.org.nz/2005/speakers/Maurice_Moore_OTARA_handout.pdf
     
    O are the objectives or learning outcomes T are the themes that represent the way we decide to chunk related objectives to achieve our goal A are the activities students need to undertake to achieve their goals R represents the resources we will use to support the learning activities A are the assessments we will use to gather evidence of a students learning
  • Looking at Analysis … there are three areas to analyse
    Students
    Approach
    Content
  • Types of Gaps
    Content fit or new content need - a gap in information that makes it difficult to adequately address a particular topic or an abundance of Web sites that add substantial perspective to a particular topic.
    Dynamic content - sometimes content may not be stable enough to commit to paper because it is constantly changing. Examples include some aspects of law and politics.
    Conceptual difficulty - students are unable to engage with the information they have in such a way that it makes sense.
    Access issues - students are unable to make use of a resource because they lack the equipment, expertise or transportation to make effective use of it or else it requires specialised equipment or personnel that may not be available to the learner as needed.
    Efficiency issues - existing means of learning a particular topic cost too much in terms of time or money for either the institution or the student to bear.
    There are various forces that will encourage you to identify gaps to fill, including the following:
    Areas of teaching and learning difficulty. These are outlined in the bulleted list above. Any one of these four difficulties is excuse enough to seek an eLearning solution.
    Internal motivation. There may be a particular idea you have for enhancing one of the topic areas you are involved in teaching.
    External motivation. It could be that there is pressure on you from management or students to adjust the way in which elements of your course are taught.
  • Blooms taxonomy
  • http://www.elearningguild.com/showFile.cfm?id=2557
    Session 409 – The 30-minute Masters: ID for your SMEs – Clive Shepherd, Fastrak Consulting Ltd.
    The major concern we have raised in this paper is that too much e-learning today focuses on content and not the pedagogy. The ease with which technology enables anyone to put content online is resulting in a digital form of the “instructor-centred” teaching and learning paradigm. The only engagement for the learner seems to be the “Next” and “Back” navigational controls.
    http://www.wikieducator.org/images/9/90/PID_577.pdf
    How Do We Design Inspiring Online Vocational Courses?
  • Session 606 – Powerful Designs: Structuring the Learning Experience Margaret Martinez, The Training Place, Inc.
    http://www.elearningguild.com/showFile.cfm?id=2601
  • http://www.wikieducator.org/images/9/90/PID_577.pdf
    How Do We Design Inspiring Online Vocational Courses?
  • Session 606 – Powerful Designs: Structuring the Learning Experience Margaret Martinez, The Training Place, Inc.
    http://www.elearningguild.com/showFile.cfm?id=2601
    We also suggest repeating essential information – don’t take it for granted learners read all the instructions. If you have something important to say, then say it often in different places.
    http://www.wikieducator.org/images/9/90/PID_577.pdf
    How Do We Design Inspiring Online Vocational Courses?
  • http://www.ecornell.com/about/approach/whitepaperV2_1.pdf
    A learning molecule, which is the equivalent of a topic in a course, is constructed by assigning a
    learning tool to each scenario, resource, utility, evaluation, or collaboration part of the molecule.
    Our set of interactive learning tool templates is called the Periodic Table of Online Learning
    Elements. The illustration below shows how different elements from the periodic table are applied
    to a specific part of the learning molecule.
  • http://www.elearningguild.com/showFile.cfm?id=2529
  • http://www.elearningguild.com/pdf/2/091002DES-H.pdf
  • http://www.wikieducator.org/images/9/90/PID_577.pdf
    How Do We Design Inspiring Online Vocational Courses?
    Good face-to-face
    facilitators who get learners to work in small groups in their classrooms do not do this so that they will simply “discuss” an issue, but rather for them to create something tangible. Why do we so often forget this principle of good classroom facilitation when we are teaching online?
  • http://www.wikieducator.org/images/9/90/PID_577.pdf
    How Do We Design Inspiring Online Vocational Courses
  • http://www.wikieducator.org/images/9/90/PID_577.pdf
    How Do We Design Inspiring Online Vocational Courses?
    The major concern we have raised in this paper is that too much e-learning today focuses on content and not the pedagogy. The ease with which technology enables anyone to put content online is resulting in a digital form of the “instructor-centred” teaching and learning paradigm. The only engagement for the learner seems to be the “Next” and “Back” navigational controls.
    To meet the needs of learners we urge instructional designers to be guided by the kinds of design principles we have suggested in this paper – the employment of authentic, contextualised activity-based learning strategies that are supported, meaningful, relevant and above all inspiring.
  • eLearning introduction

    1. 1. eLearning Staff Grant Sherson • Team Leader - Education Technology Unit Kevin Brennan • eLearning Advisor & Developer Kay Lewis • Senior Lecturer, eLearning Advisor & Developer, Faculty of Humanities & Business
    2. 2. Session Overview Date Topic 31 October Choosing your approach to eLearning 7 November Analysis (students, content, resources, and objectives) 14 November Design (selecting appropriate approaches to match the analysis). 21 November Development (Tips and techniques for developing the content for the eLearning site and what support is available) 28 November Implementation (Tips and Techniques getting started with your students) 5 December Evaluation (Reviewing the academic effectiveness of your eLearning).
    3. 3. Free & Easy First Line Management ?? Most UCOL Classes Grad Cert in Applied eLearning
    4. 4. High embedded instructional design High student completion Teacher managed pathway Student needs to be self motivated High advanced preparation High teacher-student interaction Asynchronous delivery Small classesLow quality resources OK
    5. 5. One view of levels of eLearning Learning Objects – simulations and interactive multimedia Two-Way Communications – bulletin boards and group pages, file transfer Online Exercises – quizzes (multiple choice, matching questions, etc.), surveys One-Way Communications – email, Web pages, student tracking Information Repository - course outlines, content, learning materials, Web links 1 2 3 4 5 Levels Source: Nichols, M. (2001). Teaching for Learning: Designing RBL Courses for the Digital Age. TrainInc.co.nz/Books. Palmerston North, NZ.
    6. 6. Development steps for building eLearning resources - ADDIE. Source: http://www.epsilonlearning.com/focus.htm See also Instructional Design: http://www.tds.holmesglen.vic.edu.au/idonline
    7. 7. Analysis Existing Approach What ‘works’? What do students struggle with? What do students ‘get’ easily? Existing Approach What ‘works’? What do students struggle with? What do students ‘get’ easily? Students Existing Knowledge Motivation Learning Characteristics Learning Needs Resource access Students Existing Knowledge Motivation Learning Characteristics Learning Needs Resource access Existing Content / Assessment Which bits are recall? Which bits are demonstration? Which bits are comprehension? Which bits are application? Existing Content / Assessment Which bits are recall? Which bits are demonstration? Which bits are comprehension? Which bits are application?
    8. 8. • Example of Process – Source: http://connect.educause.edu/Library/Abstract/Cr eatinganOnlineCourseDev/45364? time=1223342095
    9. 9. Gap analysis • Essentially a gap is the space between where you are and where you want to be. A 'gap' can be thought of as a learning need. • Can you identify any gaps in the courses that you are currently teaching!
    10. 10. Source: http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/resources/Teaching/CourseDesign/Objectives/BloomsTaxonomyVerbs.pdf
    11. 11. Category Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis higher order Synthesis higher order Evaluation higher order Description Information Gathering Confirming Making use of knowledge Taking apart Putting Together Judging outcomes The skills demonstrate d at this level are those of : observation and recall of information; knowledge of dates, events, places; knowledge of major ideas; mastery of subject matter. understanding information; grasping meaning; translating knowledge into a new context; interpreting facts, comparing, contrasting; inferring causes; predicting consequences. using information; using methods, concepts, theories in new situations; solving problems using required skills or knowledge. seeing patterns; organization of parts; recognition of hidden meanings; identification of components. using old ideas to create new ones; generalising from given facts; relating knowledge from several areas; predicting, drawing conclusions. comparing and discriminating between ideas; assessing value of presentations; making choices based on reasoned argument; verifying value of evidence; recognising subjectivity. What the student does : Student recalls or recognizes information, ideas, and principles in the approximate form in which they were learned. Student translates, comprehends, or interprets information based on prior learning. Student selects, transfers, and uses data and principles to complete a problem or task. Student distinguishes, classifies, and relates the assumptions, hypotheses, evidence, or structure of a statement or question. Student originates, integrates, and combines ideas into a product, plan or proposal that is new to him or her. Student appraises, assesses, or critiques on a basis of specific standards and criteria. Sample trigger words : · define · list · label · name · identify · repeat · who · what · when · where · tell · describe · collect · examine · tabulate · quote · predict · estimate · differentiate · extend · summarize · describe · interpret · discuss · extend · contrast · distinguish · discuss · explain · paraphrase · illustrate · compare · apply · demonstrate · complete · illustrate · show · examine · modify · relate · change · classify · discover · use · compute · solve · construct · calculate · separate · order · explain · connect · divide · compare · select · explain · infer · arrange · classify · analyse · categorize · compare · contrast · extract · combine · integrate · rearrange · substitute · plan · create · design · prepare · compose · modify · create · design · hypothesize · develop · formulate · rewrite · decide · test · measure · judge · explain · compare · summarize · assess · justify · discriminate · convince · conclude · select · rank · predict · argue Extract from: http://www.enoreo.on.ca/schoolnet/grassroots/pdf/indbrubric.PDF : Education Network of Ontario
    12. 12. The Problem • Poorly-designed materials can fail to engage the learner, can be poorly understood, can overload the learner with unnecessary content and are often neither remembered nor applied back on-the-job.
    13. 13. The Process • When embarking on learning design, we suggest educators think first about what the learner has to be able to do. They should then devise some authentic activities and tasks to support the learning process. Finally, they should think about what content resources learners may need access to in order for them to accomplish those tasks.
    14. 14. Repeating and sequencing activities
    15. 15. Choosing priorities • As designers of eLearning experiences, less is often more. Find the elusive 20% of the learner’s time that yields 80% of what is learned and put your energies there. Source: Meaningful Metrics for e-Learning: Translating Learning Outcomes into Business Results eLearning Producer 2005 Conference & Expo http://www.elearningguild.com/showfile.cfm?id=956
    16. 16. Planning Activities
    17. 17. Adding emotion
    18. 18. Adding Relationship • learning programs that engage the learner directly by using first and second person language yield better learning than the same programs that use more formal language.
    19. 19. Group Activities • “Including collaborative activity in an online course is probably the best way to tap into all learning styles present in the group” (Palloff & Pratt, 2003, p. 36). Learners complement one another and check out their assumptions and preconceived ideas. This is important for the development of the critical thinking skills so important to adult learners. In groups they can also co-create knowledge and meaning. There is typically more reflection when learners work in groups, which leads to deeper learning.
    20. 20. Activities in context • Whenever possible, we recommend that activities should be developed in contexts that refer to the intended purpose of the learning.
    21. 21. Activities in context (cont) • We recommend thinking about adding fun, drama or controversy to get your adult learners hooked. • Not every course requires collaborative work or a social constructivist approach. • We do not advocate including a discussion forum as an afterthought to content development.

    ×