Creative Commons 101
Sarah Hinchliff Pearson
Senior Counsel, Creative Commons
May 30, 2013
(c) law ≠ reasonable
the bright side!
There are built-in safeguards.
Enter CC.
Born December 16, 2002.
The idea.
Give authors options.
Voluntary approach.
Accessible to non-
lawyers.
Free.
The elevator pitch.
Alternative approach to “all rights reserved.”
Keep copyright but grant some permissions in
advance.
N...
Four conditions. Six
licenses.
The options.
Commercial use?
Derivatives?
Derivatives under identical terms?
legal code
“lawyer-readable”
commons
deed
“human-readable”
“machine-readable”
metadata
When you use CC
material…
Attribute.
[Comply with other restrictions.]
This is a Finnish translation of "My
Awesome Report...
Where do I find it?
Provides a cushion
Applicable worldwide
+ fair use
No lawyers necessary
Broadens scope of
reuse
Thanks!
slideshow licensed CC BY 3.0
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Creative Commons 101

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Presentation at the Alliance for Community Media Conference in San Francisco. May 2013.

Publié dans : Internet
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  • Because copyright protection is granted automatically, lasts practically forever, and nearly ever “use” online is a copy, copyright regulates nearly every use we make of content online. Copyright law does not make sense in the digital age.
  • People in U.S. like to complain about fair use. “right to hire a lawyer” – but actually incredibly strong and robust – don’t take for granted.
    But fair use is not always enough.
  • Small nonprofit based in Mountain View, CA. Born in response to the problem with copyright law.
    Had a vision. Goal = working within copyright to make sharing on the web work. Tried to do this by creating public licenses for people to apply to their works.
  • Intended not as a permanent fix, but as a temporary patch before copyright was reformed to make sense in digital age.
  • Range from most restrctive – verbatim copies for NC purposes only – to least restrictive – can do anything for any purpose as long as you attribute.
    All grant same baseline of permissions – everything under copyright except derivatives.
  • All licenses require attribution.
    Differences boil down to three things: 1) whether they allow commercial use; 2) whether they allow derivatives; 3) whether derivatives must be released under identical terms
  • All licenses expressed 3 ways
  • human-readable since [luckily] not everyone is a lawyer, simplifies major terms into a few icons and non-technical language. User-friendly interface.
  • This small snippet of HTML code summarizes the CC license and associated metadata (such as who the work is authored by) into a format that software, search engines, and other kinds of technology can understand.
  • Attribution – can be done in any reasonable manner – must provide author’s name, title, copyright notice, indicate license. Example of best practices.
    Comply with other restrictions.
  • Millions of CC-licensed works online. CC search links to several search engines. Can specify “commercial purposes” and “modify, adapt.”
    Also Flickr (200 million+ pics), Wikipedia articles and media files Wikimedia Commons
  • Not a replacement for fair use! Reduces legal uncertainty; reduces need to involve lawyers or licensing bodies; applies to anyone in the world, not just the U.S., can do anything, not just something transformative.
    Just another tool in your toolbox.
  • Creative Commons 101

    1. 1. Creative Commons 101 Sarah Hinchliff Pearson Senior Counsel, Creative Commons May 30, 2013
    2. 2. (c) law ≠ reasonable
    3. 3. the bright side! There are built-in safeguards.
    4. 4. Enter CC. Born December 16, 2002.
    5. 5. The idea. Give authors options. Voluntary approach. Accessible to non- lawyers. Free.
    6. 6. The elevator pitch. Alternative approach to “all rights reserved.” Keep copyright but grant some permissions in advance. Not one size fits all.
    7. 7. Four conditions. Six licenses.
    8. 8. The options. Commercial use? Derivatives? Derivatives under identical terms?
    9. 9. legal code “lawyer-readable”
    10. 10. commons deed “human-readable”
    11. 11. “machine-readable” metadata
    12. 12. When you use CC material… Attribute. [Comply with other restrictions.] This is a Finnish translation of "My Awesome Report" © 2009 by Greg Grossmeier, used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by- sa/3.0/.
    13. 13. Where do I find it?
    14. 14. Provides a cushion Applicable worldwide + fair use No lawyers necessary Broadens scope of reuse
    15. 15. Thanks! slideshow licensed CC BY 3.0

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