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Smart grid technology

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SMART GRID TECHNOLOGY
SMART GRID TECHNOLOGY
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Smart grid technology

  1. 1. 1 Introduction to Smart Grid Technologies Ang Sovann National Polytechnic Institute of Cambodia
  2. 2. I. Introduction II. Traditional Grid III. What is Smart Grid? IV. Comparison V. Components of smart grid VI. Technology VII. Advantage VIII.Future of Smart grid IX. Conclusion Outline 2
  3. 3.  Global energy consumption is increased steadily.  Green energy penetration still in limit.  Technology is developed rapidly.  Power system is modernized to a new term of technology era. - Reliability, quality, and security - Economy( optimizing, efficiency) - Sustainability ( Carbon foot print) Introduction 3
  4. 4.  Designed to transmit and distribute power only.  Out of date of technology in this century.  Incapable of meeting today’s requirement. Traditional Grid 4
  5. 5.  Smart Grid = Smart + Grid  Smart = intelligent, neat, trim.  Grid = electric grid, network of transmission, substation, transformer that delivery power from power plants to end users.  The Korean Smart Grid Roadmap 2030: “Smart grid is a next generation network that integrates information technology into existing network power grid to optimize energy efficiency through two-way exchange of electricity information between suppliers and consumers in real time”. What is Smart Grid? 5 Smart Grid?
  6. 6.  The Strategic Deployment Document for Europe's Electricity Net- works of the Future: “Smart Grid is an electricity network that can intelligently integrate the actions of all users connected to it – generators, consumers and those that do both – in order to efficiently deliver sustainable, economic and secure electricity supplies. ”  National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST): “Smart Grid is a grid system that integrates many varieties of digital computing and communication technologies and services into the power system infrastructure.” What is Smart Grid? 6
  7. 7. Comparison 7
  8. 8. Components 8
  9. 9.  Advance Meter Infrastructure.  Two-way communications.  Accurate and detail of bills.  Collect data periodically.  Utilities can control consumer ‘s energy use. Smart Meter 9  Bidirectional flow record.  Consumer can sell the power back to grid.  Consumer can cut of energy cost.
  10. 10.  Home Energy Management System (EMS).  Track the energy use in detail to better save energy.  Set appliances to turn on/off automatically when a large demand threatens to cause an outage, blackout.  Get financial incentives for doing so from utility  Sell power back to grid By mini-generation. Smart Home/Appliances 10
  11. 11.  Many of appliances will be networked together through EMS.  be able to respond to signals from energy provider to avoid using energy during times of peak demand.  Ex. smart air conditioner might extend its cycle time slightly to reduce its load on the grid.  smart dishwasher might defer running until off-peak hours. Smart Home/Appliances 11
  12. 12.  Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEV).  charge it at the most optimal time  when power demand is at its lowest.  when wind power is typically at its peak. Smart Home/Appliances 12
  13. 13.  Know clearly behavior of power generation resources to optimize energy production.  Use feedback from multiple points in the grid.  To automate maintain voltage, frequency and power factor. Smart Generation 13
  14. 14.  key component of smart distribution is outage detection and response.  Quickly indicate location of power outage point.  Automatically switching to reroute and recovery the outage quickly.  capable of detecting or even predicting cable and failures based on real-time data about weather, outage history, Smart Distribution 14
  15. 15.  Smart Substation refers to using data from Intelligent electronic devices (IED).  enables the substations to supply regional SCADA systems with smarter, more useful data.  facilitate more complex decision making and control.  Self-monitoring and control operational data. Smart Substation 15
  16. 16.  If no participation from customer, Smart grid is invisible.  Manage their power consumption to avoid power outage.  buy/sell energy from/to the grid.  Get incentives from utility by shifting their energy use to low peak demand. Customer Participation 16
  17. 17.  Integrate the renewable generation source to grid.  Improve clean energy penetration to the system. • Make low- carbon electrical power generation to be affordable. Green Energy Penetration 17
  18. 18.  Integrated Communications  data acquisition, protection, and control  enable users to interact with intelligent electronic devices in an integrated system. Technology of Smart Grid 18
  19. 19.  Sensing and Measurement  acquiring data to evaluate the health and integrity of the grid .  automatic meter reading, elimination of billing estimates.  prevent from energy stolen. Technology of Smart Grid 19
  20. 20.  Advanced Components  determine the electrical behavior of the grid.  Can apply its application to integrate with other devices to make a complex grid. Technology of Smart Grid 20  Phasor Measurement Unit  Easy to detect abnormal waveform shapes.  magnitude and phase angle of the sine waves.  record grid conditions with great accuracy and offer insight into grid stability or stress
  21. 21.  Advanced Control Methods  devices and algorithms that will analyze, diagnose, and predict grid conditions.  autonomously take actions to eliminate, mitigate, and prevent outages and power quality disturbances. Technology of Smart Grid 21
  22. 22.  Improved Interfaces and Decision Support  convert complex power-system data into information that can be easily understood by grid operators. Technology of Smart Grid 22
  23. 23. Challenges 23 Smart Grid Traditional Grid
  24. 24.  Cost  Smart devices used in smart grid are expensive which is a barrier for investor.  Modernization of existing grid infrastructure.  Government Support  Utilities may not have capacity to fund new technology without aid of government program.  Participation from government is needed to make it visible. Challenges 24
  25. 25.  Equipment Compatibility  Some old equipment must be replace as it is not compatible with Smart Grid Technology.  All devices must be compatible for working together. Challenges 25
  26. 26.  Policy and Regulation  Government or utilities might be hesitated for huge and expensive project.  Unless an attractive return on smart grid investments is encouraged, utilities will remain reluctant to invest in new technologies. Challenges 26
  27. 27.  Cooperation  All consumer cooperation is essential to Smart Grid visible.  Diverse utilities must be cooperated to install critical circuit ties and freely exchange information to implement smart grid concepts. Challenges 27
  28. 28. Advantages 28
  29. 29. Future Smart Grid Research 29  New communication infrastructure for self-healing grid, enhancing reliability, and power quality.  Improvement network optimization.  More RES integration.  Plug- in Electric vehicle use.
  30. 30. Conclusion 30  Smart Grid is the revolution of electrical network for modern society and humanity in this 21st century.  Power supply will be more reliable, affordable, qualified, and quantitative.  Green energy penetration will be improved.  Government and utilities, consumer should have clear policy and vision to participate to overcome the barriers or challenges to make Smart Grid more visible.  The more Smart Grid improved, the more green energy for better future.

Notes de l'éditeur

  • smart meters will deliver signals from your energy provider that can help you cut your energy costs. Smart meters also provide utilities with greater information about how much electricity is being used throughout their service areas.
  • For instance, you can see the energy impact of various appliances and electronic products simply by monitoring your EMS while switching the devices on and off.

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