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The discord between social and professional digital connectedness

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Within the last decade we have seen how technology has changed the way we communicate. Mobile phones are now ubiquitous and for many access to the internet. Connecting and communicating in social spaces has provided many, the opportunity to extend their social networks, overcoming temporal, spatial and geographical boundaries. Globally dispersed connections have been reunited. Multimedia sharing and user generated content flies through the air and adds a richness to the dialogues that ensue.

However, despite the advice on responsible use of social media that is readily available, for some there seems to be a naivety or unawareness of the impact of their digital identity as they transcend the 'digital airwaves'. There is a blurring of social and professional that is open for all to see. Monitoring and surveillance is something anyone can undertake. My talk will highlight some of the dangers of open digital connectedness and will also look at how taking ownership of your online presence can not only enhance the way others perceive you, but also help you highlight your professional you.

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The discord between social and professional digital connectedness

  1. 1. The discord between social and professional digital connectedness Sue Beckingham | @suebecks | Keynote eLearning 2.0
  2. 2. Within the last decade we have seen how technology has changed the way we communicate. Mobile phones are now ubiquitous and for many access to the internet. Connecting and communicating in social spaces has provided many, the opportunity to extend their social networks, overcoming temporal, spatial and geographical boundaries. Globally dispersed connections have been reunited. Multimedia sharing and user generated content flies through the air and adds a richness to the dialogues that ensue. However, despite the advice on responsible use of social media that is readily available, for some there seems to be a naivety or unawareness of the impact of their digital identity as they transcend the 'digital airwaves'. There is a blurring of social and professional that is open for all to see. Monitoring and surveillance is something anyone can undertake. My talk will highlight some of the dangers of open digital connectedness and will also look at how taking ownership of your online presence can not only enhance the way others perceive you, but also help you highlight your professional you.
  3. 3. Follow @elearning2 #elearning2 @chris_evans @rogueclone1138 Include in tweets #elearning2
  4. 4. Sue Beckingham Educational Developer, Faculty TEL Lead and Senior Lecturer in Computing at Sheffield Hallam University I have research interests in social media, digital identity, technology enhanced learning Co-lead for @BYOD4L, @LTHEchat and @FOS4L.
  5. 5. 60 second elevator pitch Turn to the person in front or behind you SHAKE HANDS Take it in turns to introduce yourself with who you are and what you do
  6. 6. A handshake is a short ritual in which two people grasp one of each other's like hands, in most cases accompanied by a brief up and down movement of the grasped hands. Using the right hand is generally considered proper etiquette. Wikipedia The handshake is commonly done upon: meeting, greeting, parting, offering congratulations, expressing gratitude, or completing an agreement. In sports or other competitive activities, it is also done as a sign of good sportsmanship. Its purpose is to convey trust, respect, balance, and equality. If it is done to form an agreement, the agreement is not official until the hands are parted. The handshake
  7. 7. Antiochus I of Commagene, shaking hands with Heracles 70-38 BC, British Museum. Leaders welcome a boy into Scouting, March 2010, Mexico City, Mexico. Note the left-handed handshake. The handshake
  8. 8. Sweaty Palms Dead Fish Brush Off Controller Politician Finger Vice Bone Crusher Lobster Claw Hand Wrestler Teacup Dr Gregory Stebbins 2007 The top 10 handshake types and what they reveal about you
  9. 9. 1. Sweaty Palms When a person is nervous their sympathetic nervous system often becomes overactive, sometimes resulting in sweaty palms. Do what you can to put this individual at ease. 2. Dead Fish Indifferent handshakes that feel like the person has no bones in their hand often indicate a passive or reserved personality. This handshake ranks as the number two least favored. Individuals with this type of clasp are generally not people-focused. Knowing this, you can tailor your presentation to de- emphasize the people aspect and focus more on the mechanical or thing-focused benefits. Exceptions to this rule might be musicians and surgeons whose livelihood depends on sensitive hands and who are therefore reluctant to open up to a bone crusher. 3. Brush Off This handshake type is a quick grasp and then a release that feels like your hand being shoved aside. This handshake is a statement of “it’s my turf and my agenda that matters, yours doesn’t.” Listen first to what the person wants before talking about your ideas for them. 4. Controller You feel your hand being pulled toward the person or strongly guided in a different direction, perhaps towards a chair. People who do this are controllers. This means they want to dominate any inanimate or animate object in the room (and that would include you). If your goals are different than theirs there may be challenges ahead. Do more listening than talking and see if you can find common ground so these individuals can control the situation toward your desired objective. 5. Politician Your hand is firmly grasped as in a normal handshake. However, their other hand may cover yours or be placed on your forearm or shoulder. Unless the two of you are good friends, this is a form of false sincerity. The person is attempting to communicate that the two of you have a deeper relationship than you actually have. After receiving this kind of handshake, I recommend you check your pockets or purse to see if anything is missing. Similarly, be cautious about relying on this person’s word for anything and be attentive in your dealings with them.
  10. 10. 6. Finger Vice When someone grabs your fingers and not your entire hand it is meant to keep you at a distance. These people are often insecure. If they also crush your fingers they are adding a show of personal power, which is also designed to keep you at a distance or at least create some fear of challenging them. I wouldn’t recommend becoming submissive, however it will serve your purpose to be somewhat deferential to them. 7. Bone Crusher The message of squeezing your hand until you cringe is clearly designed to intimidate you. Even when the person may not know how strong they are, there is still a message of intimidation and power behind the grip. You don’t have to pretend to be a wimp with them, and, in fact, they may respond positively to you if you present yourself with strength. Just don’t get into a hand-squeezing contest when you shake because then it becomes a competition and even if you win, you’ll lose. 8. Lobster Claw Like the claw of a lobster, the other person’s thumb and fingers touch the palm of your hand. The person doing this fears connecting at a deep level and may have challenges building relationships. Take your time. Allow them to open up at their own pace. As they become more comfortable with you their handshake may actually change. Once they fully accept you, they can become a client for life. 9. Hand Wrestler Your hand is taken normally and then twisted under the other person’s. This is usually done aggressively. Be very careful in your own presentation as this person is absolutely committed to being on top, regardless of what they say they want. 10. Teacup This handshake feels normal except that there is no palm-to-palm contact. The other person’s palm is cupped, like a teacup. This handshake indicates that the person is hiding something from you. It might just be a serious case of shyness or it could be something more substantial. Always check for missing information when working with this individual.
  11. 11. Effective communicators The first, active meaning maker (speak or writer) requires the skilled cooperation of the second, reactive meaning maker (listener or reader). speaker or writer listener or reader Steve Wilshaw 2015
  12. 12. The shared construction of knowledge The ability to share and receive information, as well as to network with the potential to construct new knowledge. Kanuka and Anderson 1998
  13. 13. Are new online communication skills required? New knowledge can be constructed as a synthesis of contradictions resulting from social interchanges however there are bridges to cross Kanuka and Anderson 1998
  14. 14. Online we are experiencing a blurring of boundaries
  15. 15. Boundary crossing technologies receiving/sending text messages on employer provided communications devices using employer computers to check personal e- mail and social network profiles workplace home
  16. 16. The workplace: the quintessential social establishment “A social establishment is any place surrounded by fixed barriers to perception in which a particular kind of activity regularly takes place.” Goffman 1959 "Individuals preserve audience segregation by following the rules of decorum of each social situation and by filtering the information about themselves available to each audience" Abril et al 2012
  17. 17. It's important to understand the concept of Self in the digital world
  18. 18. Beware of your Digital Doppelgänger! Politician Musician Filmmaker Brewery Explorer but it could be worse... Avoid being mistaken for someone else with your name. Ensure you add a profile photo and relevant bio.
  19. 19. Maximise the positive opportunities of a professional online presence
  20. 20. Google's perception of who I am
  21. 21. The Digital Me
  22. 22. Some of my digital spaces http://www.suebeckingham.com/
  23. 23. 1. Follow selectively 2. Browse Engage Share Amplify 3. Consider your online ‘voice’ 4. Build your online reputation and digital presence Tips
  24. 24. Connected Author Connected Publisher Connected Conversationalist Strategic Disconnector A curious, lifelong pursuer of ingenious solutions Being connected isn’t just for socialising; it’s a life skill (Davis 2013) Essential know-how for the well-connected Lifelong and Lifewide Learner
  25. 25. Freedom of Speech?.....
  26. 26. There is no instant warning message....
  27. 27. • leaving a device logged on • not deleting old Bebo/MySpace accounts • uploading 'those' photos that are regretted the morning after • not keeping on top of security settings • openly sharing 'stuff' that would never be done face to face Student Social Media 'slip ups'
  28. 28. Who is watching ??? .... and why?
  29. 29. PERSONAL (social) PROFESSIONAL Adapted by Sue Beckingham from Digital Visitors and Residents Mapping Process - Dave White, University of Oxford 2013
  30. 30. Where you 'visit' or 'reside' online An exemplar of what this might look like completed. PERSONAL PROFESSIONAL EMAIL EMAIL TWITTER BLOG A BLOG B FACEBOOK GROUP FACEBOOK LINKEDIN GOOGLE+ SEARCHING PINTEREST
  31. 31. A practical project Following the Client brief the students on the module had 1 week to prepare and in pairs pitch their ideas to the Client. The Client gave immediate feedback. Students developed their proposed visual artefact over 2 weeks, gave a short presentation to the Client and once again received feedback Students were then invited to develop this work further and give a further presentation showing their artefact to a panel. The Client and panel gave feedback and then shortlisted 4 winning projects These 4 groups then polished their artefacts further and presented their final work.
  32. 32. 'The importance of responsible use of social media and the value of developing a professional online presence' Sue Beckingham All students attended a Client led seminar
  33. 33. No matter how attentive your class is there will always be at least one not 'present'
  34. 34. Aim 1: Highlight that some employers will carry out Google searches to uncover the digital footprint of an individual...
  35. 35. Raise awareness that an unprofessional online presence could mark the end of a career before it has even started.... Aim 2:
  36. 36. Aim 3: Help students consider the real impact of a social media faux pas
  37. 37. Aim 4: Through engaging with the project, students would develop graduate skills
  38. 38. "The most important thing that I learnt throughout the client project was the how crucial it was to have a detailed plan of what must be done and when. The key was to have perfect time management." "In this client project I have learnt how to show my work, confidently to a large audience."
  39. 39. "I've learnt a lot from this project including how to work well in a team and organise what we do best, as well as create assets to a professional standard under time constraints" "Good communication with the client is vital"
  40. 40. The Students' Work
  41. 41. Henry Iveson and Josh Evers
  42. 42. Steph Hodgson and Jade Kinder
  43. 43. Students can showcase their work Opportunities for global connections
  44. 44. The Digital Native is a myth Provide scaffolded support Encourage peer mentors Be the guide by the side Celebrate being a co-learner
  45. 45. Bryan Mathers - @BryanMMather - Visual Thinkery Expert Education Technology Action Group - http://etag.report/
  46. 46. ETAG concluded that: The use of digital technology in education is not optional. Competence with digital technology to find information, to create, to critique and share knowledge, is an essential contemporary skill set. It belongs at the heart of education. Learners should receive recognition for their level of mastery; teachers and lecturers should too.
  47. 47. Be a role model Take the opportunity to share what YOU are doing Blogs | Twitter | LinkedIn | Google+
  48. 48. LOCKED UP AND FORGOTTEN PROFILES?
  49. 49. Social Media ranks highly in searches so by being professionally present in these spaces can be to your advantage
  50. 50. Learn with and from global educators
  51. 51. Open CPD opportunities https://byod4learning.wordpress.com/ 4th iteration January 2016 https://foslearning.wordpress.com/
  52. 52. Returns September 2015 Wednesday 8-9pm @LTHEchat #LTHEchat http://lthechat.com/ Weekly tweetchats LTHEchat: Learning and Teaching in Higher Education
  53. 53. The #LearningWheel https://prezi.com/xe4osp6m9fos/learningwheel/
  54. 54. Learning can be fun!
  55. 55. The #blimage challenge
  56. 56. "The Paradigm Shift: Refocusing on the Student" Are you ready for the future? http://www.elearning2.org/ eLearning 2.0 Conference - Brunel University, London

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