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Relationships, Technology, and Mental Health

Presented by students from the Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies (CAPS) Teacher Education Program.
Technology has had a positive place in education with its resources for learning and communication, but it also has received negative press considering addictions to devices, time on task, and isolation of students. Students, however, feel that they are not connected to devices but rather connected to a network and community in which they live. Educators could feel more comfortable with this concept if technology could be viewed as an asset rather than a distraction. Join us to hear from students on how teachers can leverage technology to not only build better relationships with students and each other, but also as a way to promote mental health, confidence, positivity, and acceptance into a lifelong community of learners.
This session is created by and presented by eleventh and twelfth grade high school students who are a part of a Teacher Education program at the Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies. They work with practicing teachers and their students and also research and study innovations in learning.

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Relationships, Technology, and Mental Health

  1. 1. & Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies
  2. 2. Introducing our presenters...
  3. 3. Taylor Falkner 2nd Year CAPS TEACHER ED Kansas Educators Rising Co-Vice President @educatorsrising @edrisingks
  4. 4. https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-06-04-the-future-of-education-depends-on-social-emotional-learning-here-s-why
  5. 5. https://www.usnews.com/news/education-news/articles/2018-01-26/the-kids-are-not-alright-the-push-for-social-and-emotional- learning
  6. 6. @youthworxgood @kidgritedu @jeffreyljordan 25 Stories from young adults about successful navigation through change --------------------------------
  7. 7. “Schools and systems of education that do not embrace digital learning and place a high emphasis on standardization will always fail to resonate with our students.” -Cort Monroe Ed.D
  8. 8. Relationship Building
  9. 9. How do kids with special needs benefit from peer mentors in the classroom? -Relationships outside the classroom -Socialization -Behavior Models How do the students benefit from building relationships with their teachers? -Improves student attitude -More likely to ask for help LetMeTalk Peer Mentors ONLY 55% of T E A C H E R S reported receiving training in SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LEARNING according to a nationwide survey. EducationPost.org
  10. 10. ● Relationship building through exchange of positive events ● More student/teacher engagements ● Pressing into students + care = high performance Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses On Achievement. Routledge. Student-Teacher Relationships
  11. 11. Johnson, David W. “Student and Teacher Safety in Chicago Public Schools: The Roles of Community Context and School Social Organization.” Chicago's Charter High Schools: Organizational Features, Enrollment, School Transfers, and Student Performance | UChicago
  12. 12. Middleton, M. J., & Midgley, C. (2002). Beyond Motivation: Middle School Students’ Perceptions of Press for Understanding In Math ure
  13. 13. THE POWER OF CREATIVE THINKING - The use of imagination or original ideas to create something - Build connections within a digital community https://ifaketextmessage.com/
  14. 14. Relationship Building and Technology
  15. 15. ● Improved communication ● Provided digital models ● Encouraged online group collaboration ● Provided opportunities for open education How does technology improve the ability to work, to learn, and to develop relationships?
  16. 16. ● Change in student & teacher roles ● Increased motivation/self esteem in students & teacher Technology Strengthens Classroom Environment
  17. 17. Kids aren't addicted to technology, they are addicted to the relationships they have built through it. Certain apps can help enhance student learning and help them to build better relationships.
  18. 18. Positive use of these apps can help students learn!
  19. 19. Gaming In Classes - Video games connecting teachers and students alike (Optional Teaching Method) - Example: Battlefield 1, Valiant Hearts: The Great War, Class Craft)
  20. 20. Mental Health
  21. 21. https://www.nami.org/NAMI/media/NAMI- Media/Infographics/Children-MH-Facts-NAMI.pdf Mental Health Facts Children & Teens
  22. 22. Mental Health in the Classroom ● Addressing students to help their mental health ● Express empathy ● Avoid argument ● Affirm, reinforce, and complement ● Positive Feedback ● Acknowledging failure and success equally Activities that are helpful in the classroom ● Yoga ● Walk in my shoes activity ● CBT thought record ● Mood tracker
  23. 23. Implementing Brain Breaks What is a brain break and why should it be used? ● Incorporating short bursts of physical movement to stimulate neurological pathways and help both hemispheres of the brain work together, helps with retaining knowledge and reducing stress How can brain breaks help build relationships and better mental health? ● Long periods of sitting can stunt your learning and not allow your full brain to retain knowledge; brain breaks help you become more focused when working ● Allows students a quick breather to relax and interact ● Helps reduce student stress load https://www.realmomnutrition.com/brain-breaks/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZeM18fPbvI https://www.edutopia.org/article/brain-breaks-restore-student-focus-judy-willis
  24. 24. Meditation ● 60% of workers in America report being stressed 3 or more work days a week ● Meditation helps you decompress ● You can meditate multiple ways at multiple place 1 minute meditation https://hbr.org/2015/12/how-meditation-benefits-ceos
  25. 25. Paws to Read ● Helps students with self confidence, fluency, and comprehension. Therapydogs.com https://www.pinterest.com/pin/491666484311659893/ ● Fee to become a therapy dog- $30 annually and a one time new member fee of $10 Benefits Students With: ● Special Needs ● Anxiety ● Depression ● Heavy Stress
  26. 26. Mental Health and Technology
  27. 27. Technology and the Impact on Mental Health “Friendly reminder that doing your best does not mean working yourself to the point of a mental breakdown.” “You don’t have to be positive all the time. It’s perfectly okay to feel sad, angry, annoyed, frustrated, scared and anxious. Having feelings doesn’t make you a negative person. It makes you human.” - Lori Deschene ”Healing takes time, and asking for help is a courageous step.”
  28. 28. Technology Promoting Positivity Students can feel a sense of accomplishment.
  29. 29. Mental Health Technology Tools Helpful Video Links: https://youtu.be/kmSinPMVU2U ~School-Link: Caring for the mental health needs of children and young people https://youtu.be/eitRd2Zlvz0 ~Student with Mental Illness Apps: WorryWatch Benefits of Technology: ● Virtual Reality and computer games ● Cheaper solution ● Provides a comfortable and safe environmentAnxiety Reliever
  30. 30. Reminding Everyone of Mental Obstacles and Liberating from Depression R.E.M.O.L.D App Prototype Wireframe
  31. 31. Drop Down Options ● Activities/Games ● Recipes ● Exercises ● Hotlines ● Mood Tracker ● Journaling R.E.M.O.L.D App
  32. 32. Social Media Twitter: @wevegotclass @bvcaps @tammyfry @pozikc Instagram: @capsteachered @pozikc http://tinyurl.com/capsteachered https://bvcaps.yourcapsnetwork.org Thank you for coming to our presentation!
  33. 33. Additional Resources From your Presenters
  34. 34. Relationship Building Activities 1 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s3vu2WOdTHiur-_qgvppjG5siCLqACo65G9cPNZMjr4/edit?usp=sharing HP Maddie - The Human Knot - Control Tower: guides the person with a blindfold through an obstacle course - Scavenger hunt - The Perfect Square: blindfolds trying to make a square - Two Truths and a Lie Jacqueline “Where do you stand” Maddie Four Corners Game-Everyone chooses one option presented on the screen that they comply with. Once everyone gets in their groups, they can introduce each other, talk about their favorite show or car, and build relationships with those people.. Ideas: -Favorite Netflix Show -Dream Car Human Scavenger Hunt- Everyone gets a paper with a list of people traits. We will tell people to walk around the room, find people with those traits, and put their name next to that trait. Now, when you look at a person that you may have met in this activity, you will think of that trait they have. It helps people get to know each other in a fun way. Campfire Stories*- This is an activity that inspires storytelling and improves team bonding. Teams gather in a circle and share their workplace experiences. Along the way, they learn things about each other and relive old memories. Gather your people into groups of 5-10 people. Make some cards with trigger words such as “first day” or “work travel,” Everyone will get into a circle and pass around the cards. One at a time, each person will look at a card, see the trigger word and tell a short story that connects to that.
  35. 35. Relationship Building Activities 2 Paige Headbands: Have the students each take a piece of paper that has a career name on it and tape it to their heads. Then they go around the room getting hints from other students while trying to guess the career the have on their head. Or if the class knows each other well enough, have the papers have other students in the classes name on them. 4 Quarter Stories: A Game where one student starts the story and then the story gets passed on to the next student and the continue from where the other student left off. Speed: SPEED – 1) Make THREE teams. 2) Each team will send one person to the board. Read a “Speed” question (random trivia). 3) The person with the nearest answer gets ONE point. If their answer is exact then they get THREE points. 4) After answering everyone must put the TOP on the marker. First to do this will break all ties. 5) If you win that round, you stay at the board while the other teams send up their next player. If you win three consecutive rounds, your team gets TEN points. Sal Video Games: Playing multiplayer/ co-op games such as “LEGO Star Wars” or “ Wii Sports” to bond by creatively thinking of ways to overcome challenges and figure out what they like and dislike. Amanda Who is my match? Prepare name tags for every guest with a "match" name tag to go along with it that another guest has. Example, peanut butter and jelly; ketchup and mustard; pens and pencils. Participants will go around the room and introduce themselves and describe the other person's tag to find out who they are and their match.
  36. 36. Relationship Building Activities 3 Game of Possibilities Time: 5-6 minutes Number of Participants: One or multiple small groups Tools Needed: Any random objects Rules: This is a great 5-minute team building game. Give an object to one person in each group. One at a time, someone has to go up in front of the group and demonstrate a use for that object. The rest of the team must guess what the player is demonstrating. The demonstrator cannot speak, and demonstrations must be original, possibly wacky, ideas. Objective: This team building exercise inspires creativity and individual innovation.
  37. 37. Relationship Building Activities 4 Ally - Matching game: Hand out cards to everyone and have each card with a match like disney prince and princess, lilo and stitch, etc. and each person tapes it to their back and you have to find your match without talking, peers can be used but it is a quiet activity. Sloan Marshmallow and Toothpick Challenge Divide students into groups of equal numbers. Pass out an equal number of marshmallows and wooden toothpicks to each group. Challenge the groups to create the tallest, largest, or most creative structure in a set amount of time, each member taking turns doing the actual building. Afterward, have each group describe what they made. No-Hands Cup-Stacking Challenge Decide how many students you want in each group and tie that number strings to a single rubber band, making one for each group. Each person in the group holds onto one of the strings attached to the rubber band, and as a group, they use this device to pick up the cups (by expanding and contracting the rubber band) and place them on top of each other in order to build a pyramid
  38. 38. Relationship Building Activities 5 Katie The Mine Field- Divide the participants into groups of two, and find an open space (parking lot). Place a variety of objects across the open area. One teammate will be blindfolded while the other will have to verbally navigate their teammate through the obstacle without stepping on any of the items. The blind folded participant cannot speak. There can be specific routes the blind folded member has to take to make matters more difficult, or a certain objective the team has to complete. This games objective is to improve on trust, communication, and good listening skills. Lorily Team Storytelling - One person starts with a simplified starter sentence and you go around the room clockwise or counterclockwise. Each person adds a word to the sentence and builds a story out of it. You can go around as many times as the group wishes too, or until everyone feels the story should end.
  39. 39. Relationship Building Activities 6 Passion project ● Match up into small groups/Partners and talk about your hobbies or passions that you don’t normally get to talk about. Make time for questions from others. Encourage non-educational subjects, while still being appropriate.
  40. 40. I wish it didn’t happen Fence Campout Embarrassing moment Grounded Lost Warning Dream Animal In a pickle 1st date LOL Autocorrect Car At work Problems while traveling 911 Clumsy moment Sleepover Broken bone 1st day Best advice Proud A student mishap Worst advice *Sample Triggers for Campfile Activity
  41. 41. Relationships, Mental Health, and Technology: A student-focused conversation Technology has had a positive place in education with its resources for learning and communication, but it also has received negative press considering addictions to devices, time on task, and isolation of students. Students, however, feel that they are not connected to devices but rather connected to a network and community in which they live. Educators could feel more comfortable with this concept if technology could be viewed as an asset rather than a distraction. Join us to hear from students on how teachers can leverage technology to not only build better relationships with students and each other, but also as a way to promote mental health, confidence, positivity, and acceptance into a lifelong community of learners. This session is created by and presented by eleventh and twelfth grade high school students who are a part of a Teacher Education program at the Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies. They work with practicing teachers and their students and also research and study innovations in learning. Presentation Abstract

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