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Email 101 Webinar Presentation

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Email 101 presented by Scott Pearson. The presentation is a great resource for marketers who are just beginning email marketing campaigns. Also a outstanding refresher for people who are in the industry and looking to freshen up on strategy and foundation.

Publié dans : Marketing
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  • ★★ How Long Does She Want You to Last? ★★ A recent study proved that the average man lasts just 2-5 minutes in bed (during intercourse). The study also showed that many women need at least 7-10 minutes of intercourse to reach "The Big O" - and, worse still... 30% of women never get there during intercourse. Clearly, most men are NOT fulfilling there women's needs in bed. Now, as I've said many times - how long you can last is no guarantee of being a GREAT LOVER. But, not being able to last 20, 30 minutes or more, is definitely a sign that you're not going to "set your woman's world on fire" between the sheets. Question is: "What can you do to last longer?" Well, one of the best recommendations I can give you today is to read THIS report. In it, you'll discover a detailed guide to an Ancient Taoist Thrusting Technique that can help any man to last much longer in bed. I can vouch 100% for the technique because my husband has been using it for years :) Here's the link to the report ♥♥♥ https://tinyurl.com/rockhardxx➤➤ 3 Reasons Why You Shouldn't take Pills for ED (important) ◆◆◆ https://tinyurl.com/rockhardxx
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Email 101 Webinar Presentation

  1. 1. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 1 Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing Scott Pearson Partner / Vice President eCRM spearson@threedeepmarketing.com | @scott3deep
  2. 2. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 2 - 20+ years experience driving business growth through CRM and Email - Manages over 1,200 email campaigns per year - Sends over 245,000,000 permission-based emails per year - Works with B2C and B2B Fortune 100 to Small Businesses - Recognized thought leader on email strategies to support mobile devices Visit www.threedeepmarketing.com to learn more about the measureable digital marketing campaigns Scott and his team provide. Scott Pearson Partner / Vice President - eCRM Three Deep Marketing Twitter: @scott3deep Email: spearson@threedeepmarketing.com
  3. 3. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 3 Why Email?
  4. 4. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 4 Think email is dead? Businesses will use email marketing more often and more effectively in the next 10 years than they have since the beginning of the internet. Isn’t Email Dead?
  5. 5. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 5 Cost Effective Reach Your Customers Nurture Repeat Business Email Marketing has an avg. ROI of $38 for each dollar spend. One in 5 companies report an ROI of over 70:1. (DMA National Email Report 2015) In 2014, email marketing was cited as the most effective digital marketing channel for customer retention in the United States. (eMarketer) 70% of people say they always open emails from their favorite companies. (Exact Target) WhyEmail?
  6. 6. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 6 Email Design
  7. 7. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 7 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > Email Dissection 550 – 640 px Email Width 15 – 100 kb Email File Size
  8. 8. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 8 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 1 From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication name Best Practice – Use a value that the contact relates to most when thinking about your company and the content included in the email. Keep under 30 characters. Examples – (Company) Three Deep Marketing (Department) Email Marketing (Communication) Monthly Promotion (Person) Scott Pearson Fact – 43% of email recipients click the Spam button based on the email’s From Name Source: http://www.convinceandconvert.com/convince-convert/15-email-statistics-that-are-shaping-the-future/ 1
  9. 9. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 9 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 2 Best Practice – Make sure the From@Address works in conjunction with your From Name. Together they should represent to the recipient who the email is from within the company. Examples – From Name From@Address Three Deep Marketing news@mail.threedeep.com Email Marketing services@mail.threedeep.com Monthly Promotion specials@mail.threedeep.com Scott Pearson scott.pearson@mail.threedeep.com Tip – Work with your Email Service Provider (ESP) and your IT resources to get your From@Address configured correctly. The setup of your From@Address is crucial for good deliverability. Visit senderscore.org for more information. 2 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication
  10. 10. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 10 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 3 Best Practice – With the explosion of mobile devices shorter subject lines are working better. Include your main offer in the first 35 characters of your subject line. Include personalization like first name in subject lines to increase open rates. Examples – Scott, your free offer to access lynda.com expires today! For you: HP ink & toner coupons ✄ Save $20 on Work Boots Before it's Too Late Scott - meet with Optimizely? Fact – 22.3% open rate increase with personalized subject lines Source: http://www.convinceandconvert.com/convince-convert/15-email-statistics-that-are-shaping-the-future/ 3 3. Subject Line – Describes the theme of the content and main offer of the email
  11. 11. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 11 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 4 Best Practice – Should complement the subject line and be under 50 characters. Can also include an Online View link as well as an Unsubscribe link if deliverability concerns. Examples – We Create Animated Explainer Videos Reach new customers with $50 worth of LinkedIn Ads You Still Have Time to Save on New Red Wing Boots Fact – 69.9% of email marketers do not dictate the Preheader Text of their emails Source: Three Deep Marketing Inbox Study, 2014 4 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview
  12. 12. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 12 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 5 Best Practice – Focus on a narrow Header (less than 75 px) so that important content is not pushed down below the fold. Remember your reader has already viewed your From Name and From@Address so more than a simple header with logo is usually not needed. Examples – Tip – Consider removing the header on cold sales emails to resemble a personal email. 5 5. Header – The main branding element of the email creative. Typically incorporates company logo.
  13. 13. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 13 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 6 Best Practice – Keep under 40 characters and one line if possible no more than 2 lines. At least 30 pt font for readability on mobile devices. Focus is to get attention of the reader! Examples – Tip – Do Not embed your Headline in an image. Keep it text so it is visible when images are not displayed. 6 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer.
  14. 14. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 14 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 7 Best Practice – Remember email is never the destination, you are simply trying to provide enough content to convince the reader to take the action you are promoting (typically clicking). Examples – Tip – Use inline text links to provide additional options for the reader to convert on your offer 7 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading
  15. 15. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 15 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 8 Best Practice – The Heroshot image should add value by showing detail or context to improve relevance, demonstrate benefits, and answer questions. The image could be a product or lifestyle shot, but incorporating a product being used in a real life situation can produce best results. Examples – Tip – Download the Heroshot Score Card from our website. http://offer.threedeepmarketing.com/hero-shot-scorecard 8 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA
  16. 16. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 16 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 9 Best Practice – Make the CTA obvious. Use contrasting color or CTA button. Indicate urgency and a verb that promotes action. Examples – Tip – Visit our blog and check out our slide deck on the use of color and CTA conversion. http://threedeepmarketing.com/blog/color-conversion-science- clockwork-model/ 9 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link
  17. 17. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 17 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 10 Best Practice – Don’t over do it, make sure that this content doesn’t take away from or distract from the main body copy or Call to Action. Examples – Tip – Limit secondary content to 1- 3 sections to avoid diluting your main CTA conversion. 10 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections.
  18. 18. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 18 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 11 Best Practice – Think of this section of your email as customer service. Provide a handful of information and links to commonly accessed content. From a creative stand point this content should not take center stage and not stand out compared to your Body and Secondary content. Examples – Tip – Test removing this section from your emails. In some cases adding additional links like this can decrease the number of conversions to your main CTA 11 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging
  19. 19. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 19 Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 12 Best Practice – Make the unsubscribe link obvious, it is better to have a contact unsubscribe than report your email as SPAM or Junk. Examples – Tip – Compliance is important. Check the link below for email marketing compliance rules and laws for your market geography. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email_spam_legislation_by_country 12 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address (For US).
  20. 20. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 20 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Anatomy of an Email Subject Line Preheader Text Header Headline Body Heroshot Image Call to Action (CTA) Footer Secondary Content Recapture Area From Name <From@Address > 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address.
  21. 21. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 21 Welcome to Grainger. For the ones who get it done. Anatomy of an Email Microsoft Outlook Preview 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 1 3 4 Notes – You will see that the From@Address is not displayed in the Outlook preview pain. While Grainger does a very good job of branding their almost identical use of Subject Line and Preheader Text is a missed opportunity. They could of used the Preheader text to introduce me to the offer inside while the Subject Line welcomed me to their brand.
  22. 22. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 22 Anatomy of an Email iPhone 6 Inbox 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 1 3 4 Notes – You will see that the From@Address is not displayed in the iPhone preview pain. While Grainger does a very good job of branding their almost identical use of Subject Line and Preheader Text is a missed opportunity. They could of used the Preheader text to introduce me to the offer inside while the Subject Line welcomed me to their brand.
  23. 23. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 23 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Anatomy of an Email Scott, Welcome to Grainger Grainger grainger@e.grainger.co m 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address. Scot t
  24. 24. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 24 Types of Email
  25. 25. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 25 Text Html Multi-Part • Text Only • No Images • No Hyperlinks • Limited Tracking • Text and Images • Text Formatting • Hyperlinks • Open & Click Tracking • Sends Text & Html Always Send as Multi-Part Message Types of Email
  26. 26. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 26 Tips for Better Text Emails: • Having a text version is best practice • CTA can be “Paste This Link” • Use special characters to break up the email. Such as, “=====“ or “++++” to create lines and “****” to draw attention to CTA’s • Use breaks to create white space to make email scanable Source: campaignmonitor.com
  27. 27. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 27 Pop Quiz: Is this Email Text or Html? Text HtmlX Use of Image Links Stylized Text
  28. 28. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 28 Cold Permission Transactional • Purchased Lists • No Relationship • No Permission (Optin) • Compliance Concerns • Optin for Email • Prior Relationship • Permission (Optin) • Compliance Concerns • Transaction Based • Current Relationship Compliance Resources: US: https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/can-spam-act-compliance-guide-business Canada: http://fightspam.gc.ca/eic/site/030.nsf/eng/home General by Country: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email_spam_legislation_by_country Types of Email
  29. 29. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 29 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Cold Email – Meeting Request Scott - meet with Optimizely? Ryan Krebs Hit-reply@linkedin.com 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address.
  30. 30. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 30 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Cold Email – Webinar Invite My webinar tomorrow on data unification Brad Hubbard Brad.hubbard@datasift.co m 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address.
  31. 31. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 31 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Cold Email – Asset Download Want to be Agile? 6 Things You Should Know Ashley Riddle ashleyr@workfront.com 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address.
  32. 32. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 32 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Permission Email – Triggered Get Started with Evernote Evernote no-reply@evernote.com 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1112 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address.
  33. 33. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 33 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Permission Email – Newsletter Green Flash: A June Wedding: Google Loves Twitter Conductor greenflash@conductor.com 10 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1112 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address.
  34. 34. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 34 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Permission Email – Promotional Scott, your free offer to access lynda.com expires today! LinkedIn linkedin@e.linkedin.com 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1112 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address.
  35. 35. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 35 2. From@Address – Email of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID Transactional Email 3. Subject line – Offer should be included in first 35 characters. SL’s over 50 characters can get cut off 4. Preheader Text – Amplifies the message and delivers key information. Included in mobile preview 5. Header – Should be well branded and narrow so it doesn’t push main content below the fold. 6. Headline – Illustrates the theme of the communication and most importantly the offer. 7. Body – Main content area that should include sub-headlines, lists and bullets for easy reading 8. Heroshot Image – Image that relates to body content but sells or draws attention to the CTA 9. Call to Action (CTA) – Main action you want the reader to take. Usually a button or link 10. Secondary Content – Additional content and offers. May be one section or multiple sections. 11. Recapture Area – Additional information and links to general content if main content was not engaging 1. From Name – Name of the sender. Can be a person, company, division or communication ID 12. Footer – Includes compliance items including unsubscribe and physical address. - Order Confirmation - Shipping Confirmation - Change Password - Download Request - Product Recall
  36. 36. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 36 Bad Ideas
  37. 37. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 37 Images No Images
  38. 38. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 38 Images No Images
  39. 39. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 39 Content Overload…
  40. 40. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 40 Misleading…
  41. 41. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 41 Not Relevant…
  42. 42. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 42 Good Ideas
  43. 43. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 43 Focus On Deliverability • Test Prior to Sending • Clean up Blocks • Monitor Sender Score • Manage White Lists
  44. 44. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 44 Spam filters use a variety of algorithms to determine what is Spam and what is not. It is not easy for legitimate emails to avoid the spam filter, but there are some best practices of things to avoid (from MailChimp): • Using phrases like “Click here!” or “Once in a lifetime opportunity!” • Excessive use of exclamation points!!!!!!!!! • USING ALL CAPS, WHICH IS LIKE SCREAMING AT THE TOP OF YOUR LUNGS VIA EMAIL (especially in the subject line). • Using bright red or green colored fonts. • Coding sloppy HTML, usually from converting a Microsoft Word file to HTML. • Creating an HTML email that’s nothing but one big image, with little or no text. Spam filters can’t read images, so they assume you’re a spammer trying to trick them. • Clean up your list and remove all hard bounces from your database. Avoid the Junk Folder
  45. 45. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 45 Focus On Gmail Hotmail Outlook Rendering • Test Prior to Sending for Rendering on all Major ESPs (Desktop, Mobile & App) • Confirm Responsive Design for Mobile Devices • Utilize Tools to Expedite Rendering Testing
  46. 46. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 46 Focus On Responsive Design Mobile Optimizatio
  47. 47. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 47 Design for Mobile & Keep Offer Above the Fold
  48. 48. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 48 Focus On Relevancy• Right Message and Offer at the Right Time • Mix of Calendar Based Sends and Triggered Data Sends • Personalization & Dynamic Content Calendar Sends Triggered Sends • Newsletters • Promotions • Events • New Product / Service • Thought Leadership • Surprise & Delight • Email Interaction • Website Interaction • Product Purchase • Lapsed Consumer • Loyal Consumer • Onboarding / Welcome • Birthday / Anniversary Emails
  49. 49. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 49 Focus On Relevancy Gerber – Dynamic Content Based on Lifecycle PreNatal Wk 8 . . . . . . . . . Wk 40 PostNatal Mo 1 . . . . . . . . . Yr 2+
  50. 50. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 50 Focus On Relevancy Gerber – Dynamic Content Based on Lifecycle PreNatal PostNatal
  51. 51. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 51 Simple Segments • Segment Prospects • Segment Customers • Segment Based on Purchase • Segment on Web Behavior • Segment on Events • Segment by Geography • Segment by Resent Meeting Target Your Emails by Audience
  52. 52. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 52 Focus On A/B Testing • Always Look to Learn and Optimize • A/B Split Testing and Multivariate Common Tests • Subject Line • Send From • Creative A/B • Copy A/B • Call to Action (CTA) • Offer Testing • Time of Day / Week
  53. 53. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 53 Simple A/B testing goes a long way. Start with the following: 1. From Name 2. Subject Line Those two items have the greatest effect on Open Rates. Then focus on creative and offer testing to improve conversion. Optimize for Best Results
  54. 54. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 54 There is no magic date and time. It is best to test when your contacts are most responsive. Highest Optout day is – Tuesday. Know why? B2B – Best results on Weekdays (Tue-Thur). 6:00AM – 8:00AM Test for Best Time to Send Email
  55. 55. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 55 When it comes to frequency the strategy should be to send to those engaged with your communications more often. (Weekly – Monthly) Those that are not engaged target less often. (Monthly – Quarterly) Send More Often to Your Active Contacts
  56. 56. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 56 Email Marketing is an extension of your brand. Make sure everything is topnotch before sharing with the world. You’d be surprised how many companies forget items as basic as a simple spellcheck. Make Sure Your Emails Pass The Test
  57. 57. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 57 Mistakes Happen
  58. 58. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 58 Make Good Email
  59. 59. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 59 • Proofreading, Spellcheck, CTA’s • Test Hyperlinks • Images Load Correctly • Email is Responsive and Mobile Friendly • Email Displays Correctly with all Email Software (Desktop, Web, Mobile) • Send Count Matches Your Segment Count • All Compliance Items Are Accounted For (Geography Specific) Email Pre-Launch Checklist
  60. 60. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 60 Focus On Measurement • Basic Email Measurements + Business Goal Attribution • Advanced Measurement with Litmus Common Measurements • Delivery Rates • Bounce Rate • Unique Open Rate • Unique Click Rate • Unsubscribe Rate • Spam Complaint Rate (By ESP) • Forwards / Social Shares • Click/View Rate • Mobile Device Breakdown • Skim / Read Rate • # Printed • Segments / Geography • Business Goal Conversion! http://www.silverpop.com/marketing-resources/white-papers/all/2014/email-metrics-benchmark-study-2014/ Industry Benchmarks:
  61. 61. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 61 Focus On Resources for Email Marketing Education: http://www.emailonacid.com/blog http://litmus.com/blog/ http://sherpablog.marketingsherpa.com/ http://www.emailmonday.com/ http://blog.returnpath.com/ Education
  62. 62. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 62 Chew On This
  63. 63. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 63 Three Takeaways to Apply Today 1. Test From Names, Subject Lines & PreHeader Text 2. Simple Segmentation (It’s All About Relevancy) 3. Think Mobile When Creating Your Next Email
  64. 64. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 64 Is Your Email Marketing Mobile Friendly? Free Email Marketing eBook • How to reach consumers in a “world gone mobile” • How you can use media queries to your advantage • Proven strategies to create email campaigns using responsive design Offer.ThreeDeepMarketing.com/mobile-friendly-email-ebook
  65. 65. | Email 101: Best Practices for Email Marketing 65 Scott Pearson scott.pearson@threedeepmarketing.com @scott3deep

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