ACRL 2013 Metaliteracy

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This presentation examines the metaliteracy framework developed by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson. Metaliteracy will be examined as a reframing of information literacy. This presentation also reports on the successful Innovative Instruction Technology Grant (IITG) at SUNY that led to new metaliteracy learning objectives.

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ACRL 2013 Metaliteracy

  1. 1. “What’s in a Name?: Information Literacy, Metaliteracy, or Transliteracy”Trudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A. Tom Mackey, Ph.D. Distinguished Librarian Dean University Libraries Center for Distance Learning University at Albany Empire State College SUNY SUNY #acrlname ACRL 2013 Imagine Innovate Inspire 1
  2. 2. Word cloud of “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” at Wordle.net. 2
  3. 3. In 1992 Henry Jenkins proposed “an alternativeconception of fans as readers who appropriatepopular texts and reread them in a fashion thatserves different interests, as spectators whotransform the experience of watching television into arich and complex participatory culture” (p. 23). Textual Poachers: Television Fans & Participatory Culture By Henry Jenkins (1992) 3
  4. 4. “The New Media Literacies constitute the core cultural competenciesand social skills that young people need in our new media landscape.” http://www.newmedialiteracies.org 4
  5. 5. Open Educational Resources (OERs) Create. Share. Reuse.
  6. 6. The Coursera Revolution 6
  7. 7. First MOOC in SUNY System Dr. Betty Hurley Dasgupta and Carol Yeager 7
  8. 8. What is participatory learning?• Active • Social• Interactive • Convergent• Networked • Emergent• Connected • Adaptable• Collaborative • Evolving• Community • Transformative• Global • Multi-modal 8
  9. 9. ACRL Standard Definition of Information Literacy (1989) • Determine the extent of information needed • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently • Evaluate information and its sources critically • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legallyhttp://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm 9
  10. 10. http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/visualliteracy 10
  11. 11. TRANSLITERACY “is concerned with mapping meaning across different media and not with developing particular literacies about various media.” “Introducing transliteracy What does it mean to academic libraries?” Tom Ipri College & Research Libraries http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full 11
  12. 12. TRANSLITERACY “It is not about learning text literacy and visual literacy and digital literacy in isolation from one another but about the interaction among all these literacies.” “Introducing transliteracy What does it mean to academic libraries?” Tom Ipri College & Research Libraries http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full 12
  13. 13. TRANSLITERACY “is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks.” “Transliteracy: Crossing Divides” Sue Thomas, et. al. (2007) First Mondayhttp://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2060/1908 13
  14. 14. Media and Information Literacy (MIL)“Information and media literacy enablespeople to interpret and make informedjudgments as users of information andmedia, as well as to become skillfulcreators and producers of informationand media messages in their own right.”http://portal.unesco.org/ci/en/ev.php-URL_ID=15886&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html 14
  15. 15. 15
  16. 16. Mackey and Jacobson (2013) Metaliteracy in the Open Age of Social Media manuscriptFigure by Roger Lipera 16
  17. 17. “Metaliteracy promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age, providing a comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities.”Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as aMetaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 17
  18. 18. “It is a unified construct that supports the acquisition, production, and sharing of knowledge in collaborative online communities.”Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as aMetaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 18
  19. 19. “Information literacy is central to this redefinition because information takes many forms online and is produced and communicated through multiple modalities. ”Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as aMetaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 19
  20. 20. “The ability to critically self-assess one’s owncompetencies and torecognize the need forintegrated or expandedliteracies in today’sinformation environment isa metaliteracy.”Mackey and Jacobson (2013)Metaliteracy in the Open Age of Social Media(manuscript) Sofonisba Anguissola Self-portrait at the Easel Painting a Devotional Panel, 1556Metaliteracy is Metacognitive 20
  21. 21. “This metacognitiveapproach challenges areliance on skills-basedinformation literacyinstruction only and shiftsthe focus to knowledgeacquisition in collaborationwith others.”Mackey and Jacobson (2013)Metaliteracy in the Open Age of Social Media Judith Leyster(manuscript) Self-portrait, 1630Metaliteracy is Metacognitive 21
  22. 22. “This requires a high level ofcritical thinking and analysisabout how we develop our self-conception of informationliteracy as reflective learners inopen and social mediaenvironments.”Mackey and Jacobson (2013)Metaliteracy in the Open Age of Social Media(manuscript) Rembrandt Self-portrait, 1660Metaliteracy is Metacognitive 22
  23. 23. “Both metaliteracy and transliteracychallenge traditional skills-based conceptsof information literacy by recognizing therole of emerging technologies, suggestingthat information technology is a centralcomponent of students’ learning.” “Connectivism: Learning Theory and Pedagogical Practice for Networked Information Landscapes” Michelle Kathleen Dunaway Reference Services Review Vol. 39 Iss: 4 23
  24. 24. “Metaliteracy and transliteracy areframeworks for understanding informationliteracy that emphasize the importance ofcommunities, connections, informationnetworks, and information technologies” “Connectivism: Learning Theory and Pedagogical Practice for Networked Information Landscapes” Michelle Kathleen Dunaway Reference Services Review Vol. 39 Iss: 4 24
  25. 25. UNESCO: “Conceptual Relationship of Information Literacy and Media Literacy in Knowledge Societies” (2013) “Metaliteracy provides an integrated and all inclusive core for engaging with individuals and ideas in digital information environments.” (Mackey and Jacobson, Op. cit., p. 69) -Toni Carbo, Ph.D. “Consideration within the broader Mediacy and Metaliteracy Framework” A paper for UNESCO 25
  26. 26. UNESCO: “Conceptual Relationship of Information Literacy and Media Literacy in Knowledge Societies” (2013) “This new paradigm, with its broader perspective integrating the many different forms of literacy, is one that should be explored in much more depth across cultures and nations.” -Toni Carbo, Ph.D. “Consideration within the broader Mediacy and Metaliteracy Framework” A paper for UNESCO 26
  27. 27. Survey Instrument• Survey Monkey• 26 Questions• Likert scale• Some open-ended comments• Library and Information Science faculty and librarians (listservs, LinkedIn groups, colleagues)• 85.5% librarians• 551 started survey• 361 completed survey (65.5%) 27
  28. 28. Literacy frameworks familiar withN=413 28
  29. 29. Literacy frameworks related to information literacyN=419 29
  30. 30. Preparation for teaching new technologies or IL concepts Very unprepared Unprepared Neither prepared nor unprepared Well prepared Very well prepared 0 50 100 150 200N=368 30
  31. 31. Lack of knowledge or skills hinder teaching new components? No Yes 0 50 100 150 200 250N=360 31
  32. 32. Required technologies as part of information literacy instructionN=251 32
  33. 33. Most important change last 2-4 years? Increased Increased Incorporatedstudent centered emphasis on social media activities critical analysis Shifted to online Augmented teaching assessment 33
  34. 34. Metaliteracy in PracticeTEACHING STUDENTS 34
  35. 35. Understand Format Type and Delivery ModeEvaluate User Feedback as Active ResearcherCreate a Context for User-generated InformationEvaluate Dynamic Content CriticallyThomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College &Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 35
  36. 36. Produce Original Content in Multiple Media FormatsUnderstand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics andIntellectual Property IssuesShare Information in Participatory EnvironmentsThomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College &Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 36
  37. 37. Active Metaliterate EngagementBasic IL Course: • Migration of individual paper-based research guide to team-based guide using website • Creation of information: “what information would you have liked to find but didn’t?” • Data visualization/visual literacy component • Learn the technology on their own, as a team • Sense of pride and accomplishment • New skills, altered sense of participation
  38. 38. Team Project from Fall 2012
  39. 39. “Kindness Inspires Kindness in the Capital Region” Anita Brown Student Bloghttp://anitabrown35.wordpress.com/2013/03/ 39
  40. 40. Metacognitive Practice – Gain insights about the process of creating original information – Understand what one needs to know when creating and sharing – Recognize gaps in knowledge – Seek new knowledge to adjust to challenging situations – Adapt to changing technologies – Continuously self-reflect – Demonstrate empowerment through interaction, communication, and presentation – Reflect on production and participation 40
  41. 41. Innovative Instruction Technology Grants (IITG) 41
  42. 42. SOSIUS Collaborative Space 42
  43. 43. Trans-Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative 43
  44. 44. http://youtu.be/KKDC5INkE6E 44
  45. 45. http://metaliteracy.org/ 45
  46. 46. Individual Reflection• Spend 2 minutes thinking about how you might design an activity or an assignment to meet one of the objectives 46
  47. 47. Sharing and Polishing• Group with several people near you• Share the ideas you each developed• Select one to develop further• Select a spokesperson• Add to metaliteracy.org if time 47
  48. 48. SHARING YOUR IDEAS 48
  49. 49. QUESTIONS? 49
  50. 50. New MOOC for Fall 2013: #L4LLLLiteracies for Lifelong Learning (a Metaliteracy MOOC)
  51. 51. Trudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A.Distinguished LibrarianHead, Information Literacy DepartmentUniversity LibrariesUniversity at Albany, SUNYTom Mackey, Ph.D.DeanCenter for Distance LearningEmpire State College, SUNY Visual representation of “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” from the null_sets site at the University of Tennessee. http://www.flickr.com/photos/nullsets/8587487783/ 51

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