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 Research Site: Secondary School in Regina,
Saskatchewan with approximately 1600 students
from Grades 9-12. 20% of studen...
 Peercy and Martin-Beltran (2012) - “when pairs envisioned their
work as collaborative, they created a synergy that const...
 How do I understand my practice better as a
result of collaborating with content teachers
to provide sheltered instructi...
 The Literacy Engagement Framework
(Cummins, J., Mirza, R., & Stille, S., 2012)
 Sheltered Instruction Observation Proto...
 Action Research Study
 Five participants in total.
 Myself as the practitioner-researcher.
 One EAL teacher as a “cri...
 Pre- and Post-Interviews
 Observations
 SIOP Lesson Plans
 Participant Journals (E-Mails, Journals,
any written commu...
 EAL teacher (Beth) as “critical friend”.
 “…[O]ur world is getting a lot smaller and we need to learn
about each other ...
“The lesson was lengthy to plan and deliver.”
Content Objectives: I can recognize familiar common place phrases in
writing and replace them with original or distinct wo...
Processes:  Reading  Writing  Listening  Speaking
Can volunteer to read their poems aloud.
Strategies: Hands-on  Mean...
Extensive prior experience collaborating as
part of an inter-disciplinary team
Fewer opportunities to meet and discuss
...
EAL Science and Chemistry 20
SIOP Lesson Planning
Co-Teaching Science 10 Course
(www.scienceten.wordpress.com)
Highest...
ChallengesOpportunities
 Finding time to meet for planning,
grading, reviewing reflections, focusing
on the models of col...
 The Five Levels of Collaboration
framework developed by Davison (2006)
1. Pseudo-compliance or passive
resistance
2. Com...
 How do I understand my practice better as a result
of collaborating with content teachers to provide
sheltered instructi...
 EAL and content teachers have much to learn
from each other.
 Sharing with another EAL expert is valuable to
reinforce ...
 Collaborative training in teacher collaboration
 Educate teachers on how to use common
collaborative tools such as SIOP...
“All teachers working with ESL students [ELLs] need to be
equipped with not only knowledge of language and culture, but
al...
 Arkoudis, S. (2003). Teaching English as a second language in science classes: Incommensurate
epistemologies. Language a...
EAL and Content Teachers Collaborating to Support All Students at a Saskatchewan Secondary School
EAL and Content Teachers Collaborating to Support All Students at a Saskatchewan Secondary School
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EAL and Content Teachers Collaborating to Support All Students at a Saskatchewan Secondary School

Presentation for AAAL 2015 Conference in Toronto, Ontario. Presented on March 21, 2015.

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EAL and Content Teachers Collaborating to Support All Students at a Saskatchewan Secondary School

  1. 1.  Research Site: Secondary School in Regina, Saskatchewan with approximately 1600 students from Grades 9-12. 20% of students are EAL students originating from 35 different countries including China, Pakistan, India, Korea, the Philippines, and Russia.  Terminology: English as an Additional Language (EAL) Students/Teachers; Content Teachers; Mainstream classrooms  Increasing number of EAL students in the school district. Need for English as an Additional Language (EAL) teachers and content teachers to work more collaboratively to support students.
  2. 2.  Peercy and Martin-Beltran (2012) - “when pairs envisioned their work as collaborative, they created a synergy that constructed a broader network of resources for ELLs by bringing together more people, materials, ideas, and abilities than either teacher was able to generate alone.”  Creese (2006) - The content teacher is responsible for ensuring that students learn content and meet the required outcomes while the EAL teacher seeks to ensure that metalinguistic needs are being met.  Fu et al. (2007) - As a result of teacher collaboration, ELLs gained confidence and were more willing to take risks in the mainstream classroom. Teachers learned a great deal about teaching and about themselves as teachers.  Arkoudis (2003) - Emphasizes the importance of pedagogical relations between teachers and urges that teachers remain open to constant negotiation where understandings emerge as they develop.
  3. 3.  How do I understand my practice better as a result of collaborating with content teachers to provide sheltered instruction for EAL students in mainstream classrooms? How can I help content teachers to better support EAL students?  Which collaborative activities do we perceive to be most effective for teachers’ professional development and for EAL students’ academic success?
  4. 4.  The Literacy Engagement Framework (Cummins, J., Mirza, R., & Stille, S., 2012)  Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2008)  The Five Levels of Collaboration framework developed by Davison (2006)
  5. 5.  Action Research Study  Five participants in total.  Myself as the practitioner-researcher.  One EAL teacher as a “critical friend” Costa and Kallick (1993).  Three content teachers including two English teachers and a science teacher.
  6. 6.  Pre- and Post-Interviews  Observations  SIOP Lesson Plans  Participant Journals (E-Mails, Journals, any written communication)
  7. 7.  EAL teacher (Beth) as “critical friend”.  “…[O]ur world is getting a lot smaller and we need to learn about each other and [I] find that working together, we can achieve more.”  “I think that collaborative team members need to recognize that these are all of our kids and they are not just the EAL teachers’ responsibility and if you have them on your class list, you need to treat them like you treat everybody else. I also feel like …if the work is too difficult, then it’s your responsibility to make it more accessible for your kids so you have to highlight key terms or I know that more one-on-one time for them or assign a buddy to them…something that the classroom teacher should have to do so I think we all need to come together and talk about, you know, the special needs that our EAL kids have.”
  8. 8. “The lesson was lengthy to plan and deliver.”
  9. 9. Content Objectives: I can recognize familiar common place phrases in writing and replace them with original or distinct words, phrases, or images. Language Objectives: I can write clichés using words and images. Key Vocabulary: cliché, tone, concrete image, sensory language, parallel constructions Higher Order Questions:  What general idea or theme are you suggesting through your clichéd images? (Be specific!)  How do the images create a particular tone? For example, critical, admiring, objective tones. Scaffolding:  Modeling  Guided  Independent Grouping: Whole Class Small Group  Partners Independent
  10. 10. Processes:  Reading  Writing  Listening  Speaking Can volunteer to read their poems aloud. Strategies: Hands-on  Meaningful  Links to Objectives Review and Assessment (Check all that apply): Individual  Group Written  Oral Review Key Vocabulary: Create a colour coded system to identify the vocabulary in own writing piece. For example, highlight three words that identify the tone in your writing. Review Key Content Concepts: Create a unique poem about personal identity using the style of Duke Redbird and including the key concepts.
  11. 11. Extensive prior experience collaborating as part of an inter-disciplinary team Fewer opportunities to meet and discuss “Tuesdays with Morrie” Example Ranked lower on Davison’s Levels of Collaboration
  12. 12. EAL Science and Chemistry 20 SIOP Lesson Planning Co-Teaching Science 10 Course (www.scienceten.wordpress.com) Highest level of collaboration Used SIOP strategies, planned, assessed & reflected
  13. 13. ChallengesOpportunities  Finding time to meet for planning, grading, reviewing reflections, focusing on the models of collaboration.  Lack of common prep time  Trying to balance our roles as co-teachers (content/EAL)  Expand knowledge of each other’s areas › Ability to observe students while other is teaching › Introduce different teaching strategies – try new things!  Better support students › Both content and language needs addressed › Students may connect with one teacher more than other › Content being presented in different ways › Lower teacher to student ratio
  14. 14.  The Five Levels of Collaboration framework developed by Davison (2006) 1. Pseudo-compliance or passive resistance 2. Compliance 3. Accommodation 4. Convergence 5. Creative Co-Construction
  15. 15.  How do I understand my practice better as a result of collaborating with content teachers to provide sheltered instruction for EAL students in mainstream classrooms? How can I help content teachers to better support EAL students?  Which collaborative activities do we perceive to be most effective for teachers’ professional development and for EAL students’ academic success?
  16. 16.  EAL and content teachers have much to learn from each other.  Sharing with another EAL expert is valuable to reinforce knowledge.  Co-teaching involves open communication, mutual respect and commitment to learning  Effective professional learning  Content teachers  Enjoyed incorporating content/language objectives  Appreciated alternative point of view  Realization they can be very flexible  Lots of benefits to collaboration for teachers and students
  17. 17.  Collaborative training in teacher collaboration  Educate teachers on how to use common collaborative tools such as SIOP lessons or Davison’s Levels  Provide teachers with education in teacher leadership/facilitation  Ensure that time is made available to support collaborative opportunities from an administrative perspective
  18. 18. “All teachers working with ESL students [ELLs] need to be equipped with not only knowledge of language and culture, but also skills of collaboration, leadership and critical reflection, to engage all educators in the innovative process that leads to change in schools. Not only do all teachers need to understand and embrace their roles as language teachers and cultural facilitators, but they need to take on the challenge of being an advocate for ESL students and collaborating with other educators, parents, and the community in advancing our efforts to prepare ESL students for the twenty-first century.” He, Y., Prater, K., & Steed, T. (2011). Moving beyond 'just good teaching': ESL professional development for all teachers.
  19. 19.  Arkoudis, S. (2003). Teaching English as a second language in science classes: Incommensurate epistemologies. Language and Education, 17(3), 161-173.  Costa, A., & Kallick, B. (1993, October). Through the lens of a critical friend. Educational Leadership, 51(2), 49-51.  Creese, A. (2006). Supporting talk? Partnership teachers in classroom interaction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 9(4), 434-453.  Cummins, J., Mirza, R., & Stille, S. (2012). English language learners in Canadian schools: Emerging directions for school-based policies. TESL Canada Journal, 29(6), 25-47.  Davison, C. (2006). Collaboration between ESL and content teachers: How do we know when we are doing it right? The International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 9(4), 454-475.  Echevarria, J. V. (2008). Making Content Comprehensible for Secondary English Learners: The SIOP® Model. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.  Fu, D., Houser, R., & Huang, A. (2007). A collaboration between ESL and regular classroom teachers for ELL students' literacy development. Changing English, 14(3), 325-342.  He, Y., Prater, K., & Steed, T. (2011). Moving beyond 'just good teaching': ESL professional development for all teachers. Professional Development in Education, 37(1), 7-18.  Peercy, M., & Martin-Beltran, M. (2012). Envisioning collaboration: including ESOL students and teachers in the mainstream classroom. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 16(7), 657-673. Follow me on Twitter! @trudythorson

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