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Why Millennials Listen to Crap Music

The music industry is changing a lot. It has to. Innovation, behaviour, insights, quality... And millennials are mostly responsible for that. Presentation being part of the Project 1001 - the conclusions after listening to all the albums from '1001 albums to hear before you die'

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Why Millennials Listen to Crap Music

  1. 1. MUSIC INSPIRING MILLENIALS WHY MILLENNIALS LISTEN TO CRAP MUSIC?
  2. 2. MY OWN EXPERIMENT 1001 ALBUMS YOU MUST HEAR BEFORE… • 1001 Albums • 10 months of active listening • An average of 100 albums per month • More than 3 albums per day (thank you ) • Listening even the albums I knew (most of them) After working on the relationship between great music and business, I wanted to explore some other topics related to music and people.
  3. 3. A SIMPLE OBSERVATION WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED? #1 in US billboard ‘Best Album of All time’ for Rolling Stone and others A total new way to approach Pop Music #1 in US billboard - -
  4. 4. GETTING CLOSE TO A RECIPE MUSIC AND ITS EVOLUTION
  5. 5. MUSIC EVOLUTION MUSIC CONTENT IS LOSING QUALITY Harmonic Complexity LoudnessTimbral Diversity Most of the harmonies are quite the same over the years, with the same association of the same chords. And the most famous trick from the new songs since couple of years was called by the blogger Patrick Metzger who defined ‘the Millenial Whoop’ (see video) Timbre defines the texture and the depth of the music. Needless to say it dropped dramatically. The peak of timbre quality was in the 60’s and then never stopped going down through the years. Compression made each track sounds louder to attract better the listeners. Though, this compression is a problem for the quality of the music which makes the overall recording qualities sound much worse. The radio use very well this trick to make people stay tuned. Source - Spanish National Research Council, 2012
  6. 6. MUSIC EVOLUTION WITH THE SAME PRODUCERS BEHIND THE HITS Max Martin Lukasz Gottwald Aka Dr Luke
  7. 7. MUSIC EVOLUTION WITH THE SAME PRODUCERS BEHIND THE HITS ‘Baby One more Time’ - Britney Spears ‘It’s my Life’ - Bon Jovi ‘U + Ur hand’ - Pink ‘Alone’ - Avril Lavigne ‘Generation’ - Simple Plan ‘California Gurls’ and ‘Roar’ - Katy Perry ‘I Kissed a Girl ‘ - Katy Perry ‘Girlfriend’ - Avril Lavigne ‘Circus’ - Britney Spears ‘Tik Tok’ - Kesha ‘Party in the USA’ - Miley Cyrus ‘Who Knew’ - Pink
  8. 8. HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC ? MUSIC - A UNIQUE CONTENT
  9. 9. THE 7 ATTRIBUTES HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC ZERO DISTANCING Artists are expected to be constantly accessible, especially on social media, offering unique and intimate moments to their fans. Not much linked to the quality of their music, it’s all about their proximity with the people. Millennials crave intimate glimpses into the mundane daily activities of their favorite celebrities. - More than 3/4 of millennials say they feel a stronger connection to musicians who are open about who they are. - 53% say the more an artist shares online about themselves, the closer they feel to them. - 91% say it’s OK if an artist has some flaws – it makes them human and likeable. Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV
  10. 10. THE 7 ATTRIBUTES HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC CRAVING FOR CO-CREATION “A fan-artist symbiosis has emerged, with the two working together on social media as one another’s branding machines.” It’s clear that millennials, desiring to be part of the creative outputs, are looking for simpler and more impactful content that they can have an influence on - 1 in 4 millennials has made a parody. - 64% relish the role of ‘tastemaker’ for friends. - 58% say that feedback and connectivity are huge motivators for posting and sharing music. Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV
  11. 11. THE 7 ATTRIBUTES HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC FED DAILY, FED DIFFERENTLY. You have to obey the rules of now-established social networking platforms. But also, you have to give the followers something new everyday that they can enjoy and consume without getting bored Facebook is the most “formal and official outlet” for tour updates and information. Twitter offers a “blow-by-blow feed,” and highlights interactions with other celebrities. Instagram provides a direct line into their literal world-view, like “seeing the world through their eyes.” Tumblr is the more intimate glimpse into an artist’s psyche/spirit. Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV
  12. 12. THE 7 ATTRIBUTES HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC IF THEY DON’T BUY YOUR STUFF, DON’T TAKE IT PERSONALLY. Fans, especially younger fans, have an expectation of free.  In fact, many younger listeners have never been forced to pay for music in their lives (streaming platforms, Kazaa and others; furthermore, many believe music should be free on principle). In that context, if they’re buying your stuff, they’re generally regarding it as a major gesture.  Indeed, 68 percent of millennials interviewed by MTV said they only buy music out of respect for the artist, and they believe music should be free. Just 1/4 had purchased music in the last week; 30 percent in the last month (all of which actually sounds pretty high). Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV
  13. 13. THE 7 ATTRIBUTES HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC MUSIC IS ON A SHUFFLE Social media has made it easier for millennial music fans to be exposed to different music genres. They are savvy at using different tools, apps, sites and Wikis to dive into genres or artists from the past but also from their generation – a millennial list of “fave artists” might be as diverse as One Direction, Led Zeppelin, Nirvana, Lil Wayne and The Supremes. But also it should make music an easy-to-consume content. - 85% agree that “among people of my age, it’s cooler to listen to a diverse range of music versus one genre.” Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV 2013Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV
  14. 14. THE 7 ATTRIBUTES HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC NO SUCH AS SELLING OUT As savvy marketers of themselves, millennials understand that the system of getting free music/ streaming means artists have to make their money somewhere. They completely accept that the artists are forcing their way from pure creation but also they have to make money - 68% say when it comes to artists and musicians, as long as they are real and not fake, there is no such thing as “selling out.” - Although, 61% say they would think less of an artist who put out a product that didn’t fit with their brand/reputation. Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV
  15. 15. THE 7 ATTRIBUTES HOW MILLENNIALS CONSUME MUSIC BUYING MUSIC IS SYMBOLIC PATRONAGE Having grown up with free downloading software like Napster and Kazaa, this generation never needed to buy music. When they buy it now, it’s because they want to support an artist that they respect and connect with. - At the time of the study, only 1 in 4 Millennials had bought music in the past week and only 28% within the past month. - 68% say they only pay for music out of respect to the artist. - 81% say the closer they feel to an artist, the more likely they are to support that artist by purchasing music rather than downloading for free. Source - ‘Music to the M Power’ - MTV
  16. 16. MILLENNIALS DRIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY CHANGES MUSIC CONSUMPTION CHANGES
  17. 17. MUSIC CONSUMPTION IS CHANGING MUSIC MARKET SLOW RECOVERY Source - ‘Global Music Report 2017’ - IFPI 2017 The global recorded music market grew by 5.9% in 2016, the fastest rate of growth since IFPI began tracking the market in 1997. This was a second consecutive year of global growth for the industry (followed by a positive year in 2017) with revenue increasing in the vast majority of markets. This growth, however, should be viewed in the context of the industry losing nearly 40% of its revenues in the preceding 15 years. Streaming has been the clear driver of this growth, with revenues surging by 60.4%. With more than 100 million users of paid subscriptions globally, streaming has passed a crucial milestone. It makes up the majority of digital revenue, which, in turn, now accounts for 50% of total recorded music revenues. The global digital market is now seeing unprecedented competition, with streaming services developing and extending their offerings around the world. Rather than cannibalising the existing streaming base, these developments are expanding it, providing fans with a more varied, richer experience and bringing streaming to new audiences and new territories.
  18. 18. MORE THAN MUSIC MILLENNIALS LOVE MUSIC…DIFFERENTLY The consumption of music is not dropping on the younger audience, all the contrary, but what we call music might be related to something totally different of what it used to mean Music is consumed in many different formats though related to many different contexts. The growth of streaming, podcasts, Youtube is definitely related to different needs, expectations and behaviours. Music is consumed on different devices and is listened to at almost anytime of the day. Long time ago, it was a ceremonial to put a vinyl to play, now, it’s part of the daily environment. Music is everywhere but more and more in the background of other activities. Music is profoundly social giving the listeners engagement and influence, a sort of social badge to receive recognition and visibility - through podcasts, shareable playlists…. Music still plays its role of social influence but more through technology and platforms. Music is the starting point of bigger stories. Music became difficult to be judged for its intrinsic qualities, it’s mostly about the experience built around - from concert to partnerships…. Source - Nielsen ‘Millennials on Millennials’
  19. 19. MUSIC CONSUMPTION IS CHANGING INNOVATION PREVAILS FOR MUSIC MARKET GROWTH Source - ‘Global Music Report 2017’ - IFPI 2017 Necessity of a pivotal transformation of the business and it is very important that labels are proactive in developing and evolving their business models, whether to apply some local specificities or just making evolvement in business models. New technologies are booming - voice-controlled technology can be crucial in pushing streaming further into the mainstream, expanding demographic appeal. Amazon itself reports that the Alexa/ Echo combination is already “fundamentally changing not just the way people inter- act with their music service, but when and where and how much they listen to music. The real challenge in delivering the required diversification and education. Concerted willingness on the part of the labels to engage with digital innovation of all stripes, to make sure mu- sic is not only a part of cutting edge new services – but a legitimate, licensed and monetised part (rise of licensed lip-synch app, UGC content platforms, data-based knowledge…)
  20. 20. CONTENT STRATEGY FOR MILLENNIALS LESSONS ABOUT CONTENT…NOT ONLY MUSIC
  21. 21. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS MAKE YOUR BRAND MORE HUMAN AND GENUINE
  22. 22. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS FOCUS ON THEIR BELIEFS, INTERACTIONS AND BEHAVIOURS (DATA)
  23. 23. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS HIGH EXPECTATIONS WITH LOW PATIENCE LEVELS
  24. 24. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS MAKE THEM INTERESTED NOT TO BE BYPASSED (EXPERIENCE)
  25. 25. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS MAKE IT VISUAL (BUT NOT WITH BRANDED ATTRIBUTES)
  26. 26. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS DON’T TRY TO SELL TO MILLENNIALS
  27. 27. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS TRY TO SATISFY THEIR FOMO (FEAR OF MISSING OUT)
  28. 28. CREATING CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS BE DIFFERENT BUT TRY TO FOLLOW SOME WINNING RULES
  29. 29. BEST IN CLASS MUSIC-RELATED CONTENT IF YOU GET IT, YOU MAKE IT
  30. 30. AIR NEW ZEALAND Around the world, Christmas is a Northern Hemisphere-dominated event, synonymous with frosty snowmen and frightful weather. Problem is, for the Southern Hemisphere, those things don’t represent Christmas at all. Down there, Christmas is in the middle of summer, not winter. But the warm, sunny festive identity is never represented. So we set out to give New Zealand a special gift – a chance to ditch Northern traditions and embrace their very own Christmas identity - and put Air New Zealand at the heart of the holiday season in the process.
  31. 31. ADIDAS Coinciding with the airing of the Grammy Awards back in February, the campaign featured musical luminaries that included Snoop Dogg, Desiigner and MadeinTYO, alongside a reinvention of one of the most overplayed tunes from the American songbook. The main takeaway of the campaign? Originality doesn’t have to mean being first.
  32. 32. GOOGLE Google Play Music needed to stand out in Australia’s crowded streaming landscape, where there’s little differentiating platforms in the eyes of users. To set them apart, increase brand awareness and position the platform as an innovator, our idea was to create exclusive content that fans would love: an immersive interactive music video. We collaborated with local hip-hop legends Hilltop Hoods. Their track, Through The Dark, is a deeply personal song written by band member Dan Smith (MC Pressure) about his son Liam’s battle with leukaemia. Raw and real, the song connected deeply with audiences. Our idea was to bring that to life, translating conflicting emotions into something conveying the sense of a father’s world turned upside down. Users move through simultaneous 3D worlds, The Dark and The Light, by rotating their mobile device and navigating a journey through fear towards hope.
  33. 33. SONY MUSIC The inspiring work was designed to go against the “Controversy of Verdun” – a tide of far-right backlash against popular French rapper Black M, a week before the official commemorations of World War I. The resulting social media campaign around his album launch mobilised his fan base and twice topped France’s Twitter trends chart.
  34. 34. INNOVATION. ENTERTAINMENT. COMMUNICATION. MARKETING. STORYTELLING. BUSINESS…WE CAN DISCUSS ABOUT YOUR BRAND OR YOUR PRODUCT STRATEGY. CONTACT ME ON FRANCK.VINCHON@GMAIL.COM
  35. 35. THANK YOU KEEP ON ROCKIN’

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