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Our Male Role Models & Their Inspiring Stories

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Our Male Role Models & Their Inspiring Stories

  1. 1. Our Male Role Models & Their Inspiring Stories 20 November 2018 Ramisa Nawar, Sadiyya Sultana, Saima Ali and Shimsad Narmeen
  2. 2. Process • Anonymous voting by women in the Dhaka office • Selection of 4 champions/role models based on # of votes • Four volunteers took up responsibility to interview 1 champion each • Open-ended guiding questions provided • Cases and pictures compiled Coming up: • We will take votes from women in field offices and write case studies for the remaining champions over the next few months.
  3. 3. The names that came up • Malcolm Dickson • Benoy Kumar Barman • Khandaker Hasib Mahbub • Md. Ashik Reza • Anisuzzaman • Zakir Hossain • Rayhan Hayat Sarwer • MHM Mostafa Rahman • Md. Hafijur Rahman • Md. Nahiduzzaman • Md. Sahidul Islam • Md. Shohorab Hossain • Zohurul
  4. 4. Story of Role Model/Gender Champion Mr. Khandker Hasib Mahbub, IT Ramisa Nawar HR Assistant; r.nawar@cgiar.org
  5. 5. Early Life Mr. Hasib grew up in a typical middle class family with his parents and sister. He was raised in a society where women had predetermined gender roles. Growing up, the ideas of equity and equality were not fully explicit to him. As he stepped into adult life, started a job and got married, he slowly started to understand them.
  6. 6. It’s been 17 years since Mr. Hasib and Ms. Keka Yasmin got married. They have two beautiful children together: a son, Sabahat Mahbub (16), and a daughter, Linnea Mahbub (6). They’re the source of his inspiration. Ms. Yasmin was only 18 years old when she got married. Mr. Hasib always sympathized and acknowledged the fact that she had to leave her family at such a young age. He appreciates her support and the huge contribution to his family, especially to his children. He tries to help her with chores as much as possible and looks forward to spending time with her. Family
  7. 7. The way he treats his female colleagues sets him apart! Mr. Hasib always thinks before saying something, irrespective of both men and women. But he is more careful with women. He believes in “positive discrimination” as our society hasn’t been completely favorable for women yet. He tends to give women priority. This has increased since the birth of his daughter.
  8. 8. Challenges As this quality was not inherited, he had to go through a self-development process to change his own mindset and get out of his in-built views and perceptions. His advice to other men is to change the way the society looks at women, have the right attitude and don’t be intimidated by women’s success. Views on feminism Mr. Hasib considers himself as a feminist. He believes that society has a big misconception about it. People think feminists are haters of men, rather it is a common goal: to define, establish, and achieve political, economic, personal, and social equality of the sexes.
  9. 9. Message to his children “Be a better version of your father to be a better gender champion”
  10. 10. Story of Role Model/Gender Champion Md. Ashik Reza, Data Analyst Sadiyya Sultana Project Management Assistant; sadiyya.sultana@cgiar.org
  11. 11. How he treats his colleagues I personally always treat my female colleagues with respect, giving them the same amount of respect as I would towards a male colleague. I always try to keep my relationships professional, always maintaining a space where my colleagues can feel comfortable with me, and ensuring that I don't say something that might be taken the wrong way or make the other person feel uncomfortable. At the end of the day, this is a workplace where everyone should feel comfortable with the people they work with, and I do my best to always ensure that.
  12. 12. Challenges to gender equity in Bangladesh Society in general is not as adaptable or flexible to change. I believe that until the rates of literacy among both men and women improve in the country, a gender equitable approach will be hard to implement. I also believe that men and women cannot be on the same page until their levels of education, which are currently unequal opportunity structures, match.
  13. 13. Stance on feminism • I agree with feminism within the context of Bangladesh. • The position that women occupy in Bangladesh is critical. • A larger part of the society still does not support female empowerment, especially when it comes to women’s economic improvement or employment. • Thus most jobs still remain heavily male dominated, with the expectation that men should be providers for their families.
  14. 14. Stance on feminism (cont’d) • This in itself is a form of pressure on men as well, because it is not fair to them to be the sole earners. • Not allowing women to work also takes away their autonomy in decision making, making them dependent on the sole income earner of their family, which is usually a male. • Therefore, the concept of feminism may be used as an approach or framework within which things can be improved for women in Bangladesh.
  15. 15. Story of Role Model/Gender Champion Dr. Benoy Kumar Barman, Senior Scientist Saima Ali HR Manager; s.ali1@cgiar.org
  16. 16. Attributes that make Dr. Benoy a role model/gender champion • He feels women colleagues have equal rights and high potential. • The contribution of men and women are equal in developing the world. • Women in Bangladesh and developing countries are not yet in a strong social position because of environmental/social stigmas. • If we can create that environment there will be no difference. • He does not stereotype. He believes women can do whatever men can.
  17. 17. Growing up and personal life • Dr. Benoy always felt women were not treated the way they should be. • He took the responsibility of educating his sisters and fought for them against social stigmas and all odds. They’re all very successful now. • For him, this attribute is an innate quality. • In his personal life, Dr. Benoy chose to marry a working woman. • He has given equal education opportunities to both his daughter and son.
  18. 18. In one of his projects, he went against all odds and hired an equal percentage of men and women. “Women are more careful about household nutrition and the project had wonderful outcomes.”
  19. 19. Perceptions • His perception towards gender changed when he studied gender in his PhD program. • He considers himself a feminist. • He is an optimistic person and likes to dream big.
  20. 20. Role models Grandmother Mother
  21. 21. What needs to be done? • He believes WorldFish needs to identify potential female candidates and provide an enabling environment. • Individual improvement and better awareness are also required. • Culturally women are very deprived. He says to change the status of women in society people’s mentality needs to be changed.
  22. 22. Story of Role Model/Gender Champion Dr. Malcolm Dickson, Country Director Shimsad Narmeen Portfolio Assistant; s.narmeen@cgiar.org
  23. 23. Gender impact from early days • Grew up in a household with a lot of strong women role models, despite gender roles, including a female head of the household (grandmother). • Witnessed the array of sacrifices women usually have to make, especially in terms of employment.
  24. 24. Misperceptions about feminism • Misperception that feminism is anti-male and discriminates against men. • In reality, feminism is just looking for equal treatment for women. • This equal treatment does not exist.
  25. 25. What do men fear about equality? • Loss of power. • Feeling that there will be less male power if women have power.
  26. 26. What is needed? • We need a level playing field. • Bangladesh has made significant progress, but we still have a long way to go because the attitudes are so deep rooted, • I hope the generations coming up will find it easier.
  27. 27. What advice would you give other men? • Women should have the opportunity to pursue their goals. • It’s pointless to ignore the ability and talent of 50% of the population.
  28. 28. Men can be – and are! – agents of change  "The measure of intelligence is the ability to change."  Albert Einstein "We cannot change our past. We can not change the fact that people act in a  certain way. We can not change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play  on the one string we have, and that is our attitude.” Chuck Swindoll “Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent.  It takes a touch of genius—and a lot of courage—to move in the opposite  direction.” Albert Einstein
  29. 29. Thank You

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