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Respiratory-System.pptx

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Respiratory-System.pptx

  1. 1. Respiratory System
  2. 2. Major Functions • To supply the body with oxygen and dispose of carbon dioxide • Respiration- four distinct processes must happen • PulmonaryVentilation- moving air into and out of the lungs. • External Respiration- gas exchange between the lungs and the blood. • Transport- transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and tissues. • Internal respiration- gas exchange between systematic blood vessels and tissues.
  3. 3. Respiratory System Parts
  4. 4. Nose Providing an airway for respiration. Moistening (humidifying) and warming the entering air. Filtering inspired air and cleaning it of foreign matters. Serving as a resonating chamber for speech. Housing the olfactory receptors.
  5. 5. Nasal Cavity Lies in and posterior to the external nose The nasal cavity is the inside of your nose. It is lined with a mucous membrane that helps keep your nose moist by making mucus so you won't get nosebleeds from a dry nose. There are also little hairs that help filter the air you breathe in, blocking dirt and dust from getting into your lungs.
  6. 6. Nostril The primary purpose of the external nares is to let air enter the nasal cavities so it can be purified and sent to the next parts of the respiratory tract.  It also allows different scents to enter the nose and reach the olfactory region of the nose
  7. 7. Oral Cavity Though not a primary part of the human respiratory system, its functions include serving as the secondary passage for air to enter and exit the respiratory tract during inhalation and exhalation.
  8. 8. Pharynx is a common passageway shared by both the digestive and respiratory systems. connects the nose, mouth, and throat. It extends between the posterior nasal apertures and the entrances to the trachea and esophagus. its primary purpose is to let inhaled air pass from the nasal cavity to the larynx, windpipe and then the lungs
  9. 9. Larynx The larynx is the upper end of the lower airway.  It is continuous with the trachea below and the pharynx posterosuperiorly. Its primary function is to keep food and drink out of the airway, but it evolved the additional role of sound production (phonation) in many animals; hence, we colloquially think of it as the “voice box.”
  10. 10. Trachea The primary function of the trachea is to transport air to and from the lungs.  Without a trachea, a person would not be able to breathe.  In addition to transporting air, the trachea helps defend against disease. The mucus in the trachea helps capture microorganisms such as viruses and harmful bacteria before they enter the lungs.
  11. 11. Carina of Trachea  is a C-shaped ridge of cartilage on the trachea. being the link that connects the larynx to the primary bronchi, plays an active part in letting the air travel in and out of the lungs. possesses sensory nerve endings which cause coughing if food or water is inhaled accidently.
  12. 12. Right/Left(Primary) Bronchus to carry oxygen-rich air reach the lungs during inhalation and let carbon dioxide-rich air out of the lungs and into the trachea on its way out during exhalation. It is the connection between the rest of the respiratory tract and the lungs.
  13. 13. Right/Left Lung  to take oxygen from the environment and transfer it to the bloodstream. The lungs are the major organs of the respiratory system, which helps provide the body with a continuous supply of oxygen.
  14. 14. Diaphragm the primary muscle used in respiration, which is the process of breathing. This dome-shaped muscle is located just below the lungs and heart. It contracts continually as you breathe in and out.  is a thin skeletal muscle that sits at the base of the chest and separates the abdomen from the chest. It contracts and flattens when you inhale. This creates a vacuum effect that pulls air into the lungs. When you exhale, the diaphragm relaxes and the air is pushed out of lungs.
  15. 15. Physiology of Respiratory System The muscles of respiration contract thereby expanding the chest cavity. This causes a negative pressure within the pleural cavity (where the lungs are housed) which forces the lungs to expand. The expansion of the lungs reduces the air pressure in the lungs. This draws air from the environment which is at a higher pressure. Air will flow from an area of high pressure to low pressure. Air is taken in through the nose and the air is ‘filtered’ and heated in the nasal cavity. It then passes down the throat and enters the trachea where it rushes into the bronchi.
  16. 16. Physiology of Respiratory System  The bronchi divides the air flow between the two lungs.  The air then passes into smaller air tubes known as bronchioles and empty into the lungs.  The air enters the tiny air sacs within the lungs, called alveoli, where oxygen crosses into the blood and carbon dioxide empties into the lung.  The respiratory muscles relax and the chest cavity contracts.  The elastic lungs recoil and pushes air out through the air passages where it is emptied into the environment.

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