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  1. 1. Providing Expert Training to Software Professionals Software Tester Certification Mastering Test Design Risk-Driven Software Testing Testing with Use Cases Writing Testable Requirements Testing Under Pressure Requirements-Based Testing Systematic Software Testing Agile Testing Practices Test Estimation and Measurement Just-In-Time Software Testing Workshop Test Process Management Leadership for Test Managers Test Process Improvement Finding Ambiguities in Requirements Performance, Load, and Stress Testing Workshop Plus Many More... Software Testing MASTERthe ARTand SCIENCEof Public Courses On-site Training Live Virtual eLearning New FALL 2011 Schedule Early Bird offers See Page 3
  2. 2. 25 We have over yearsleading the industry in Software Testing 10 0 9.4outof 10 our instructors ranked in post-course evaluations Some SCIENCE... 90% Over of SQE Training students would recommend us to a friend Why Choose SQE Training? • Expert instructors with 15–30 years of real-world experience in the software industry • The most relevant selection of specialized software training courses available anywhere • Highly interactive exercises designed to keep you engaged and help you implement what you’ve learned immediately • Small classroom workshop environment • Over 20,000 students trained worldwide who provide constant valuable feedback on our courses Who’s Behind the Training? outof 10 attendees of our Software Tester Certification— Foundation Level Course pass the ISTQB exam on their first try 9 Learning Options: eLearning Public Instructor-led training in a city near you Live, instructor-led classes via your computer Self-paced learning, online Instructor-led training at your location SQE Training provides the widest selection of specialized software training courses available. Developed and taught by top industry consultants, all courses are based on the latest industry practices and updated regularly to reflect current technologies, trends, and issues. Find the training you need for software testing, development, management, requirements, and security. www.sqetraining.com
  3. 3. waystosave A N D S A V E C OM BIN E TrAining WeeK 3To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Early Bird Combine Save on a Testing Training Week The more training you take the greater the savings! Maximize the impact of your training by combining courses in the same location. Combine a full week of training for the largest discount! TESTING training weeks Sept. 19–23, 2011 Washington, D.C Oct. 17–21, 2011 San Francisco, CA Nov. 14–18, 2011 Tampa, FL A N D S A V E C OM BIN E TrAining WeeK Register 6 weeks prior for any training week course and receive $50 off per registered course day. Take a full week of training and save $250! Combine specialized training courses in the same location and save. Discounts vary depending on the amount of training days combined. Have a group and want to save more? Get details on our discount policy by contacting our Client Support Group. Bring any course to your location for team training. On-site training is both cost-effective and convenient for your team of six or more. See page 6 for more details. Add a StickyMinds.com PowerPass to any training purchase for only $79. With a PowerPass you save $100 on all future training registrations. Take advantage of the different “Ways to Save” on training using our discount programs listed below. Purchase valuable software quality training for your whole team and save. For more details on our discount policy, contact the Client Support Group at sqeinfo@sqe.com or call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524. FALL monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday Software Tester Certification—Foundation Level Mastering Test Design Test Estimation Measurement Just-In-Time Software Testing Workshop Free Seminar (9 a.m. – 11 a.m.)†Test Process Improvement Performance, Load, and Stress Testing Workshop Requirements-Based Testing* Systematic Software Testing* Risk-Driven Software Testing** Writing Testable Requirements* Agile Testing Practices Test Process Management Testing Under Pressure Testing with Use Cases** Finding Ambiguities in Requirements* Leadership for Test Managers *Tampa only **Washington, D.C. and San Francisco only † Visit sqetraining.com/Seminar for details Risk-Based Testing for Software Managers In the best of circumstances, it is impossible to comprehensively test a software product. When you add competitive schedules and tight budgets, software managers are faced with the daunting task of trying to decide what and how much to test. Often the software manager’s pleas for more time and/or resources fall on deaf ears, because the software manager cannot adequately measure the effectiveness of the testing effort. While there are no easy answers to these problems, there are strategies that managers can use to address these issues. In this short session, Rick Craig introduces a few of the principles of modern testing, including the importance of using risk analysis to prioritize tests and to formulate contingency plans. He also demonstrates how to improve on normal requirements-based coverage models and explains a couple of useful metrics to measure test effectiveness. Seminar Hours 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. Breakfast Included free seminar Sept. 23, 2011 Washington D.C Oct. 21, 2011 San Francisco, CA Nov. 18, 2011 Tampa, FL
  4. 4. 4 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Learn the latest skills and techniques through SQE Training’s courses delivered in a high-powered workshop setting. Plan your training curriculum and improve your whole team. Various learning options allow you to take each course in the method that works best for you. Software Testing Training Professional Certification Courses Page Public eLearning Live Virtual On–Site Software Tester Certification—Foundation Level 8 % % eSoftware Tester Certification—Foundation Level 29 % Core Topics for Advanced Certification 9 % % Advanced Tester Certification—Test Analyst 10 % % Advanced Tester Certification—Test Manager 11 % % Professional Development Courses Page Public eLearning Live Virtual On–Site Risk-Driven Software Testing 12 % % Systematic Software Testing 13 % % Agile Testing Practices 14 % % Testing Under Pressure 15 % % % Mastering Test Design 16 % % Test Process Management 17 % % Leadership for Test Managers 18 % % Test Process Improvement 19 % % Testing with Use Cases 20 % % Test Estimation and Measurement 21 % % Just-In-Time Software Testing Workshop 22 % % Performance, Load, and Stress Testing Workshop 23 % % Finding Ambiguities in Requirements 24 % % % Writing Testable Requirements 25 % % Requirements–Based Testing 26 % % eFoundation for Requirements Development and Management 28 % eMastering Test Design 29 % HOT TOPIC HOT TOPIC HOT TOPIC HOT TOPIC NEW For a list of additional Live Virtual Courses available, pl
  5. 5. 5To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Online: www.sqetraining.com/register Email: sqeinfo@sqe.com Phone: 888.268.8770/904.278.0524 August September October November December 23–25 San Jose 23–25 Boston 30–Sept. 1 Charlotte 13–15 Minneapolis 13–15 Irvine/LA area 19–21 Washington, D.C. 20–22 Atlanta 20–22 Toronto 27–29 Pittsburgh 2–4 Anaheim, CA 4–6 NY/NJ area 11–13 Austin 11–13 Chicago 17–19 San Francisco 18–20 Raleigh 18–20 Philadelphia 25–27 Cincinnati 25–27 Vancouver 1–3 Bethesda 14–16 Tampa 29–Dec. 1 Phoenix On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand 31–Nov. 1 Bethesda 2–4 Bethesda 2–4 Bethesda August September October November December 19–20 Washington, D.C. 17–18 San Francisco 14–16 Tampa 19–20 Washington, D.C. 17–18 San Francisco 14–15 Tampa 21 Washington, D.C 19 San Francisco 16 Tampa 22–23 Washington, D.C. 20–21 San Francisco 17–18 Tampa 19–20 Washington, D.C. 17–18 San Francisco 14–15 Tampa 21 Washington D.C 19 San Francisco 16 Tampa 20 San Francisco 17 Tampa 21 Washington, D.C. 19 San Francisco 22 Washington, D.C. 20 San Francisco 17 Tampa 23 Washington, D.C. 21 San Francisco 18 Tampa 22–23 Washington, D.C. 20–21 San Francisco 17–18 Tampa 14 Tampa 15–16 Tampa 17–18 Tampa On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand On–Demand Easyto Register public course schedule lease visit our website: sqetraining.com/VirtualTraining
  6. 6. 6 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Looking for ways to save training and travel dollars? Consider the on-site advantages: Corporate Volume Pricing Companies needing to train teams to become proficient in a number of areas can benefit from corporate volume pricing. Let us help you build a training curriculum to suit your company’s needs. Get a FREE quote and details about how easy it is to bring on-site training to your location. Call Julie at 888.268.8770 ext. 212 or email onsitetraining@sqe.com. • Train your team at your location • Develop the talent already on your team and increase employee productivity • Schedule training around your current projects • Focus training on your team’s challenges in a small group environment • Implement best practices and dramatically improve your business processes • Customize course content to meet your company’s business needs • Receive expert instruction from consultants with years of real-world experience 26 5 8 318 O N - S I T E G A L L E R Y TESTING courses management courses requirements courses agile courses visual studio® courses If you have 6 or more to train, consider our on-site courses.
  7. 7. 7To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Testing Software Tester Certification Systematic Software Testing Mastering Test Design Creative Software Testing Performance, Load, and Stress Testing Workshop Technical Reviews and Inspections Exploratory Testing in Practice Software Security Testing and Quality Assurance Just-in-Time Software Testing Workshop Implementing Task-Oriented Unit Testing Finding Ambiguities in Requirements Agile Testing Practices Risk-Driven Software Testing Test Process Management Test Process Improvement Test Estimation and Measurement Leadership for Test Managers Testing with Use Cases Testing Under Pressure Mastering Test Automation Requirements-Based Testing Writing Testable Requirements Test Management Core Topics for Advanced Certification Advanced Tester Certification—Test Analyst Advanced Tester Certification—Test Manager Management Test Management Leading Successful Software Projects Managing Software Risk Practicing Great Management Test Process Improvement Agile Development Certified ScrumMaster Training Practical Test-Driven Development Agile Testing Practices Design Patterns Explained Lean Software Development Implementing Story Acceptance Tests Effective Agile Object-Oriented Analysis and Design Lean-Agile Enterprise Release Planning Agile Architecture Workshop Product Owner Certification Lean-Agile Project Management Advanced Agile Software Design Agile Team Workshop Agile Engineering Workshop Transitioning to Agile Project Management Agile Requirements Workshop Enterprise Agile Master Class Agile Awareness Training Requirements Essential Software Requirements Mastering the Requirements Process Requirements Modeling Extending Requirements Writing Testable Requirements Agile Requirements Workshop Finding Ambiguities in Requirements Agile Requirements Workshop Visual Studio® Training Overview of Visual Studio® 2010 Ultimate Tester Training with Visual Studio® 2010 Ultimate Database Training with Visual Studio® 2010 Ultimate Courses filled with real exercises
  8. 8. 8 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Software Tester Certification Certified Tester—Foundation Level Are you looking for an internationally recognized certification in software testing? Delivered by top experts in the testing industry, Software Tester Certification—Foundation Level is an accredited training course to prepare you for the ISTQB™ Certified Tester—Foundation Level exam. ISTQB™ is the only internationally accepted certification for software testing, accredited through its network of national boards. The ISTQB™, a non-proprietary organization, has granted more than 165,000 certifications in over 60 countries around the world. In the Software Tester Certification course, you’ll learn the basic skills required of a software test professional and how testing fits into software development. Find out what it takes to be a successful software tester and how testing can add significant value to software development projects. Who Should Attend? The Software Tester Certification—Foundation Level course is appropriate for individuals who recently entered the testing field and those currently seeking ISTQB™ certification in software testing. Introduction Fundamentals of software testing Software context—Why does software fail? Principles, scope, and focus of testing Debugging vs. testing Understanding risk Identifying and analyzing project and product risks Goals of testing Basic testing process Test psychology—viewpoints on testing Testing Throughout Software Development Testing and development Early testing Models and testing The “V” model Verification and validation Test levels—unit, integration, system, acceptance Understanding regression testing Understanding test types Static Techniques What is static testing? Reviews, inspections, walkthroughs, etc. General review process Common types of reviews Roles and responsibilities in reviews Success factors for reviews Limits of reviews Understanding static analysis tools Test Design Techniques Overview of test design and the design approach Documentation decisions Types of test design techniques Human/experience-based methods Black-box (functional) techniques White-box (structural) techniques Experience-based techniques Selecting the appropriate test technique Test Management Team organization Roles and responsibilities Understanding the test manager Understanding the tester Test planning and strategy Configuration management and testing Defect/incident classification and management Tool Support for Testing Selection process Introduction Benefits Risks and concerns Classifications San Jose, CA August 23–25, 2011 Boston, MA August 23–25, 2011 Charlotte, NC Aug. 30–Sept. 1, 2011 Minneapolis, MN September 13–15, 2011 Irvine/LA area, CA September 13–15, 2011 TW Washington D.C. September 19–21, 2011 Atlanta, GA September 20–22, 2011 Toronto, ON September 20–22, 2011 St. Louis, MO September 27–29, 2011 Pittsburgh, PA September 27–29, 2011 Anaheim, CA October 2–4, 2011 New York/New Jersey area October 4–6, 2011 Austin, TX October 11–13, 2011 Chicago, IL October 11–13, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 17–19, 2011 Raleigh, NC October 18–20, 2011 Philadelphia, PA October 18–20, 2011 Cincinnati, OH October 25–27, 2011 Vancouver, BC October 25–27, 2011 Bethesda, MD November 1–3, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 14–16, 2011 Phoenix, AZ Nov. 29–Dec. 1, 2011 Dale Perry has more than thirty-four years of experience in information technology as a programmer/analyst, database administrator, project manager, development manager, tester, and test manager. Dale’s project experience includes large system development and conversions, distributed systems, and both web-based and client/server applications. A professional instructor for more than twenty years, he has presented at numerous industry conferences on development and testing. With Software Quality Engineering for fifteen years, Dale has specialized in training and consulting on testing, inspections and reviews, and other testing and quality-related topics. Additional instructors for this course include Claire Lohr, Rick Craig, Lee Copeland, Conrad Fujimoto, Dawn Haynes, Robert Sabourin, Eric Patel, Jamie Mitchell, Gary Mogyorodi, Mike Ennis, and Ed Weller. $ Fundamentals of software testing—key concepts, context, risk, goals, process, and people issues $ Lifecycle testing—relationship of testing to development, including different models, verification and validation, and types of testing $ Test levels—system, acceptance, unit, and integration testing $ Test design techniques—black-box test methods, white-box testing, and exploratory testing $ Static testing—reviews, inspections, and static analysis tools $ Test management—team organization, key roles and responsibilities, test approach and planning, configuration management, defect classification and tracking, and test reporting $ Testing tools—selection, benefits, risks, and classifications 3-Day Course Outline: Course Accreditations Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Public Earn 22.5 PDUs Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/stf eLearning Learning Options Instructor Spotlight HOTTOPIC
  9. 9. 9To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Dale Perry has more than thirty-four years of experience in information technology as a programmer/analyst, database administrator, project manager, development manager, tester, and test manager. Dale’s project experience includes large system development and conversions, distributed systems, and both web-based and client/server applications. A professional instructor for more than twenty years, he has presented at numerous industry conferences on development and testing. With Software Quality Engineering for fifteen years, Dale has specialized in training and consulting on testing, inspections and reviews, and other testing and quality-related topics. Rick Craig and Claire Lohr are additional instructors for this course. Core Topics for Advanced Certification Prepare for the ISTQB™ Advanced Level Tester Certifications The advanced certifications for the ISTQB™ Test Manager, Test Analyst, and Technical Test Analyst all require a common set of knowledge and skills. Through the Core Topics for Advanced ISTQB™ Certification training course, you will develop the skills needed for all three advanced certifications. Specific techniques addressed include the place of software testing in the development lifecycle; the ethical aspects of testing; test planning, analysis, design, implementation, and execution; the role of the master test plan and level plans; risk management; reviews and inspections; and incident management. Who Should Attend? • Individuals who have taken the ISTQB™ Certified Tester—Foundation Level training and wish to expand their knowledge and skills into more advanced areas. • Individuals who have received the ISTQB™ Foundation Level certification, have met the criteria for taking the advanced certification exams, and wish to prepare for those exams. For more information regarding the criteria for taking the advanced examinations, go to www.ASTQB.org. • Anyone wishing to learn more about advanced testing topics. The “Core” course must be completed in conjunction with one of the three-day advanced courses by anyone wishing to take one of the ISTQB™ Advanced Certification exams at the completion of the three-day course. Bethesda, MD October 31–November 1, 2011 $ Define a project-level test policy and test strategy, and document them effectively $ Perform test planning, analysis, and design $ Choose the appropriate testing levels for your projects $ Measure the effectiveness of your testing $ Select and hold the appropriate level of reviews and inspections $ Manage incidents to improve software quality $ Implement test automation to support your testing efforts $ Improve team dynamics Public Course Date Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/act Foundations of Software Testing Testing and the software lifecycle Testing interrelationships Levels of testing within the lifecycle Ethics The Test Process Planning and control issues for test managers Software measurement and metrics Test planning, analysis, and design Test conditions and test cases Test implementation and execution Evaluating exit criteria Test reporting needs and issues Test closure activities Testing safety and mission-critical systems Practice exercise Reviews Selecting the appropriate review type Overall review process Key roles in formal reviews and inspections Successfully implementing review programs Choosing documents to be reviewed Evaluating results of the review Practice exercise Incident Management and Reporting Incidents vs. errors vs. defects Incident management issues and solutions Managing incidents through their lifecycle Incident data to collect and report Writing clear and understandable incident reports Implementing the incident management process Practice exercise Test Tools and Automation Cost-benefit analysis for tool implementations Risks associated with tools Test tool management issues Developing a test tool strategy Tool integration challenges Test automation language issues Deploying and sustaining test tools Tool classification and categories People Skills for Test Managers Individual people skills for test managers Role of communication in test management Communicating at different levels Key communication skills Test team dynamics Issues around the independence of testing Wrap-up and Discussion 2-Day Course Outline: Course Accreditation Public Learning Options Instructor Spotlight
  10. 10. 10 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Advanced Tester Certification—Test Analyst Prepare for the ISTQB™ Advanced Level—Test Analyst Certification Exam The ISTQB™ Advanced Tester Certification—Test Analyst training course expands on the test techniques and methods introduced in the ISTQB™ Foundation certification course and addresses those areas of the ISTQB™ advanced syllabus specifically related to the Advanced Test Analyst certification. This three-day course covers two main areas—techniques for performing effective and efficient functional testing and approaches to testing the non-functional characteristics and attributes of software systems. Specific techniques addressed include equivalence class partitioning, boundary value analysis, classification trees, decision tables, cause-effects diagrams, state diagrams and tables, pairwise techniques, use cases, and experience- and defect-based testing techniques. The non-functional software characteristics addressed include functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. This course is crammed full of hands-on exercises so that you can practice and master the methods and techniques covered in the course. Taken in conjunction with the two-day Core Topics for Advanced ISTQB™ Certification course, you will have covered the syllabus for the Advanced Tester Certification–Test Analyst course and be ready to take the certification exam. Who Should Attend? • Individuals who have taken the ISTQB™ Certified Tester—Foundation Level training and wish to expand their knowledge and skills into more advanced areas. • Individuals who have received the ISTQB™ Foundation Level certification, have met the criteria for taking the advanced certification exams, and wish to prepare for those exams. For more information regarding the criteria for taking the advanced examinations, go to www.ASTQB.org. • Anyone wishing to learn more about advanced testing topics. The “Core” course must be taken in conjunction with the Advanced Test Analyst course by anyone wishing to take one of the ISTQB™ Advanced Certification exams at the completion of the three-day advanced course. Bethesda, MD November 2–4, 2011 $ Reduce the number of test cases you need to design, create, and execute $ Find more defects and increase test coverage $ Focus on the “edges” of your system where many of the defects hide $ Create efficient and effective test cases that cover multiple inputs $ Document complex business rules, ensure their integrity, and test them thoroughly $ Document and thoroughly test critical events and time sequences $ Create tests from use cases, a popular method for writing requirements $ Explore and test the software simultaneously by tapping into your knowledge and experience Public Course Dates Risk Management The risk assessment process Identifying project and product risks Approaches for mitigating risks Prioritizing testing by risk attributes Functional Testing Techniques Equivalence class partitioning Practice exercise Boundary value analysis Practice exercise Classification trees Practice exercise Decision tables for test analysis Decision tables into test cases Practice exercise Cause-effects diagrams State diagrams and tables Practice exercise Pairwise testing Practice exercise Testing with use cases Experience-based testing Defect-based techniques Practice exercise Testing Non-Functional Quality Quality attributes—the “ilities” Reliability factors to verify Defining and checking usability Performance and efficiency considerations Maintainability factors to verify Portability needs Practice exercise Wrap-up and Discussion 3-Day Course Outline: Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/ata Public Learning Options Course Accreditation Dale Perry has more than thirty-four years of experience in information technology as a programmer/analyst, database administrator, project manager, development manager, tester, and test manager. Dale’s project experience includes large system development and conversions, distributed systems, and both web-based and client/server applications. A professional instructor for more than twenty years, he has presented at numerous industry conferences on development and testing. With Software Quality Engineering for fifteen years, Dale has specialized in training and consulting on testing, inspections and reviews, and other testing and quality-related topics. Claire Lohr is an additional instructor for this course. Instructor Spotlight
  11. 11. 11To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Advanced Tester Certification—Test Manager Prepare for the ISTQB™ Advanced Level—Test Manager Certification Exam The ISTQB™ Certification—Test Manager training class expands on the test techniques and methods introduced in the ISTQB™ Foundation Level course and addresses those areas of the ISTQB™ advanced syllabus specifically related to the Advanced Test Management certification. The course focuses on the key areas that are vital for successful test management: the foundations of software testing, test management, standards and test improvement processes, and people skills. Specific topics covered include testing as part of the software development lifecycle, metrics to assess test effectiveness, test documentation, risk analysis, estimation, test management issues, process improvement models, individual skills for testers and managers, team dynamics, leadership, and motivation. This course is filled with hands-on exercises to help you practice the methods and techniques taught in the course. Taking this course in conjunction with the two-day Core Topics for Advanced ISTQB™ Certification course, you will have covered the syllabus for the Advanced Test Management certification and be ready to take the certification exam. Who Should Attend? • Individuals who have taken the ISTQB™ Certified Tester—Foundation Level training and wish to expand their knowledge and skills into more advanced areas. • Individuals who have received the ISTQB™ Foundation Level certification, have met the criteria for taking the advanced certification exams, and wish to prepare for those exams. • Anyone wishing to learn more about advanced testing topics. The “Core” course must be taken in conjunction with the Advanced Test Management course by anyone wishing to take one of the ISTQB™ Advanced Certification exams at the completion of the three-day course. For more information regarding the criteria for taking the advanced examinations, go to www.ASTQB.org. Foundations of Testing Testing in the software lifecycle Practice exercise Testing systems and system of systems Measuring test effectiveness Other metrics and measurement issues Practice exercise Managing the Testing Process Test planning Test strategy and approach Practice exercise Test documentation requirements in context Estimation techniques Practice exercise Scheduling challenges and issues Test monitoring and control Test summary reporting Practice exercise Measuring and reporting testing status Practice exercise Determining the business value of testing Risk management within testing Practice exercise Exploratory testing techniques Testing safety and mission-critical systems Test management issues Standards and Test Improvement Process Software standards Testing standards Test process improvement models Practice exercise People Skills and Team Composition Individual skills Practice exercise Training Gap analysis Team dynamics Practice exercise Leadership Practice exercise Place of testing within an organization Motivation and morale Practice exercise Bethesda, MD November 2–4, 2011 $ Integrate testing into your software development process $ Establish a realistic test approach and strategy $ Plan, estimate, and schedule the testing effort $ Dynamically monitor, manage, and report testing activities $ Measure test effectiveness and project progress $ Evaluate and improve your test process $ Develop new skills to lead your test team 3-Day Course Outline: Public Course Dates Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/atm Public Learning Options Course Accreditation A consultant, lecturer, author, and former test manager, Rick Craig has led numerous teams of testers on both large and small projects. In his 25 years of consulting worldwide, Rick has advised and supported a diverse group of organizations on many testing and test management issues. From large insurance providers and telecommunications companies to smaller software services companies, he has mentored senior software managers and helped test teams improve their effectiveness. Rick is co-author of Systematic Software Testing. Instructor Spotlight
  12. 12. 12 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Risk-Driven Software Testing Understanding the Value of “Risk-Driven” Testing A Risk-Driven Test Process for Any Software Development Lifecycle The STEP™ (Software Test and Evaluation Process) approach for testing is a flexible and dynamic method for testing any software—no matter what software development method and technology your organization uses. By employing tools based on risk to guide testing, you and your organization will get the most value from your testing time and resources. You’ll learn to develop reusable “testware” and employ the right amount of test documentation for the system under test. Emphasizing defect prevention, the STEP process has been implemented in hundreds of testing organizations and integrated into many different software development lifecycle methodologies. Covers All Facets of Testing—Planning, Analysis, Design, Execution, and Reporting Learn how to develop and maintain master and level test plans driven by project and product risks. In hands-on exercises, you will practice identifying and analyzing these risks to create a customized test objectives inventory. Then, you’ll perform risk assessments to prioritize the inventory to better focus on developing the most valuable and useful tests and test cases. You’ll learn to determine which test to execute first and know when to stop testing. Find out how to clearly report failures and defects and to produce the metrics for stakeholders to make the most informed decisions. Focuses on the Most Important Testing Issues In a small-group class setting, your instructor, who is a seasoned testing expert, will help answer your tough testing questions and help you understand how to apply risk-driven testing to your specific situation. You’ll leave equipped with a practical and proven testing approach that you can adapt to your organization, development lifecycle, applications, and project for immediate benefit. As a tester, you’ll be equipped with the tools and skills to attack any testing project—no matter the context or scope. Who Should Attend? The audience includes test professionals, test managers, project leaders, quality analysts, and software developers. No specific prerequisites are assumed. However, attendees are expected to have some software experience. TW Washington, D.C. September 19–20, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 17–18, 2011 Dale Perry has more than thirty-four years of experience in information technology as a programmer/analyst, database administrator, project manager, development manager, tester, and test manager. Dale’s project experience includes large system development and conversions, distributed systems, and both web-based and client/server applications. A professional instructor for more than twenty years, he has presented at numerous industry conferences on development and testing. With Software Quality Engineering for fifteen years, Dale has specialized in training and consulting on testing, inspections and reviews, and other testing and quality-related topics. Robert Sabourin is an additional instructor for this course. $ Develop dynamic test strategies to reduce product and project risk with effective testing $ Learn the STEP™ test process—a flexible and adaptable approach for testing any software $ Discover the keys to risk-based test planning and how to establish realistic testing goals $ Identify, analyze, and prioritize test objectives to guide all testing activities $ Focus test designs on finding important bugs more quickly and with less effort $ Find out how to report testing results and use this information to improve your testing processes Instructor Spotlight Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Testing, Risk, and The STEP™ Process Focus of testing Value and goals of testing Risk management overview Process, project, and product risk Attitudes towards risk Stakeholder viewpoints on risk Introduction to the STEP™ test process Test Planning Developing a risk-based test strategy and approach Understanding test levels—separating efforts to reduce risk Key strategic testing issues Exercise: Assess Project Risks Test Analysis Risk assessment and mitigation analysis approaches The STEP™ Inventory process Determining test objectives Applying the inventory process Exercise: Develop an Inventory of Test Objectives Prioritizing the Objectives by Risk Risk analysis Characteristics of risk Key likelihood and impact factors Exercise: Create a risk-prioritized test inventory Test Design Approaches to test design Structured techniques Informal techniques Organizing the test objectives Selecting test design techniques Developing a test design strategy Test Execution, Reporting, and Risk Assessment Understanding test coverage Assessing test execution Evaluating test effectiveness Assessing failed tests, defects, and risks Reporting on testing and risk Stopping the test and evaluating testing effectiveness Wrap-up 2-Day Course Outline: Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/rdt Public Learning Options
  13. 13. 13To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Systematic Software Testing A Risk-Based Approach for Producing Better Software The Best Fundamental Course for Any Test Professional Learn the techniques necessary to develop and maintain a systematic, integrated software testing approach for your organization. This course details an adaptable and repeatable approach to testing that results in significantly improved software quality. Better planning, analysis, design, and implementation of tests result in happier clients and developers. The STEP™ (Software Test and Evaluation Process) approach described in this course emphasizes prevention of software defects and stresses continuous improvement for lasting benefits. The STEP process has been implemented in hundreds of testing organizations and integrated into many different software development lifecycle methodologies. Know What You’ve Done—and When You’re Done Understanding and managing risk helps you focus on the important testing issues. Trace your tests back to requirements, design, and code to reveal what you have tested and what remains to be tested. This course leads you through test planning, test analysis, and test execution, showing you how to set—and then effectively satisfy—your testing goals. Who Should Attend? The audience includes test professionals, test managers, project leaders, quality analysts, and developers. No specific testing prerequisites are assumed. However, attendees are expected to have some software experience. Foundations of Modern Testing Testing as a formal process Testing within development lifecycles Testing as a part of quality assurance Importance of risk-based testing STEP™—The Software Test and Evaluation Process STEP architectural model Overview: phases, activities, roles STEP vs. common industry practices Test Planning Planning fundamentals Planning and risk management Master Test Plan—based on the IEEE 829 standard Regression testing focus and issues Test environments—issues and concerns Schedules, estimates, and budgets Acceptance, system, build/integration, and unit level test plans—based on the IEEE 829 standard Test Analysis Identifying test objectives Analyzing requirements and designs to determine test objectives Creating the inventory of test objectives Applying risk to each objective Understanding software failure modes Using risk to focus the testing effort Testing system modifications, new versions, and third-party software Test Design and Implementation Defining the test architecture Designing test cases and test procedures Understanding test data requirements Developing reusable “testware” Understanding the test environment Inventory trace matrix and coverage Test Execution and Reporting Executing tests Reporting and managing defects Performing root cause analysis Evaluating the product and the test and development processes Assessing the criteria for “stopping” testing Final Perspective Improving your testing process Guidelines for fostering change Course summary TW Tampa, FL November 14–16, 2011 $ Develop effective testing plans and strategies, execute them efficiently, and measure your results $ Design “testware” that finds important bugs more quickly and with less effort $ Prevent software defects and failures by integrating testing into your development process $ Improve your software testing practices and the quality of your organization’s software $ Explore a flexible, risk-based approach to testing for both small and large organizations 3-Day Course Outline: Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/sst Public Learning Options Course Accreditations Earn 22.5 PDUs Dale Perry has more than thirty-four years of experience in information technology as a programmer/analyst, database administrator, project manager, development manager, tester, and test manager. Dale’s project experience includes large system development and conversions, distributed systems, and both web-based and client/server applications. A professional instructor for more than twenty years, he has presented at numerous industry conferences on development and testing. With Software Quality Engineering for fifteen years, Dale has specialized in training and consulting on testing, inspections and reviews, and other testing and quality-related topics. Additional instructors for this course include Lee Copeland, Rick Craig, Claire Lohr, Robert Sabourin, and Dawn Haynes. Instructor Spotlight
  14. 14. Agile Testing Practices Skills and Knowledge to Succeed in Agile Projects Agile Testing Practices Agile software practices are being employed within many development organizations worldwide. More and more test teams and testers are participating in agile projects or are embedded within agile teams. Many testers struggle to understand the agile development process and their place in it. Learn the fundamentals of agile development, the role of the tester in the agile team, and the agile testing processes. From user stories and through development and testing, this course prepares you to be a valuable member of an agile development team. Explore the business and technology-facing tests agile projects demand and how agile testers help the project succeed. Learn about the techniques of Test-Driven Development (TDD) and Acceptance Test-Driven Development (ATDD)—the cornerstones of agile testing. Practice the technical and team skills you and your fellow testers need for success in the brave new world of agile development. Practice of Agile Testing Techniques—Hands-On Explore agile testing processes in an informal and interactive workshop setting. Examples are studied through a series of hands-on, small group exercises and discussions. Who Should Attend? This course is appropriate for both novice and experienced software testers. Developers expected to test within agile teams will find this course extremely useful. Test and development managers also will benefit from this course. A background of basic development and testing processes is helpful. TW Washington, D.C. September 19–20, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 17–18, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 14–15, 2011 Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Fundamentals of Agile Development Agile principles The Agile Manifesto Agile development models Scrum Extreme programming (XP) Other agile lifecycle models How agile testing is different The Agile Team Roles within the agile team Self-organizing teams Role swapping The Agile Tester Testing role Testing tasks Automation in testing The Basis of Development and Testing Product backlogs, sprint backlogs The planning meeting User stories Test planning Agile Testing Processes Test-driven development (TDD) Unit and component tests Acceptance test-driven development (ATDD) ATTD tools Exploratory testing Non-functional testing Testing Through the Sprint The product backlog Story size estimation Sprint iteration planning Testing tasks Development tasks Unit testing Visible progress—burn down charts Bug management Stand up meetings Working with developers Bug isolation Debugging Regression testing Exercises Agile test documentation Test estimation and planning Story testing Exploratory testing 2-Day Course Outline: Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/agt Robert Sabourin has more than 28 years of management experience, leading teams of software development professionals. A well-respected member of the software engineering community, Robert has managed, trained, mentored, and coached thousands of top professionals in the field. He frequently speaks at conferences and writes on software engineering, SQA, testing, management, and internationalization. The author of I am a Bug!, the popular software testing children’s book, Robert is an adjunct professor of Software Engineering at McGill University. Instructor Spotlight Public Learning Options $ Learn the fundamentals of agile development models $ Discover how testing is different in agile environments $ Learn the basis of agile testing—the user story and how to test it $ Explore key agile testing practices—ATDD, TDD, and ET $ Examine technical and team skills you need for success $ Recognize the main agile testing challenges and how to address them 14 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com HOTTOPIC
  15. 15. Testing Under Pressure Strategies to Succeed When Time is Short Test Teams and Testers Dealing with Severe Time Limits Picture a cast-in-concrete delivery date looming on your project’s horizon. While you have precious little time remaining, the development team keeps delivering incomplete builds of less-than-stable code. Is this a “death march” project, or can the testing team actually do something useful—perhaps even save the day? Based on successful testing experiences from outrageously turbulent projects, Testing Under Pressure reveals proven principles that you can immediately apply to your own testing world. Rather than wondering if the sky is falling, you’ll develop a set of practical, repeatable skills and tools to keep yourself and your team focused on what really matters most. Instead of a checklist of what to do next, you’ll have the knowledge and confidence to think on your feet and decide every week—and every day—the most important things to do next. Real World Strategies with Hands-on Practice In this hands-on class, you’ll practice ways to “triage” your testing focus and bug-finding priorities; build a dynamic “heap” of ready-to-go tests; avoid costly rework developing and executing tests; always know the “last best build” for release; and actively monitor and act on the business, technological, and organizational “context” drivers to guide your testing. With real-world examples, interactive exercises, and lively group discussions to keep the energy up, you’ll learn ways to apply these practices in your project, your team’s development lifecycle, and your organization. If you are looking for effective testing strategies when time is running out, development is late, and change is rampant, this class is for you. Who Should Attend? Test managers, test leads, and testers who operate in an environment in which projects have fixed release deadlines, priorities change constantly, or testing resources are scarce will benefit from this course. Project managers, QA managers, and development managers in these same circumstances will benefit from the approaches and skills developed in Testing Under Pressure. Overview Key pain points What does testing really do? Testing under pressure Begin with the End in Mind Fundamental question: Are we there yet? What quality is all about Dijkstra’s truth about testing Pareto analysis Active Context Listening and Acting Influence and decision making Identifying context drivers Business values Technological solutions Organizational structures Dynamic listeners Taking action Decision-making Patterns First things first Workflow models Identifying stakeholders Individual decisions Priority, severity, and consequence Getting stakeholder buy-in Adapt to change—making it real Ruthlessly Triage Test idea sources Trade-offs Impact estimation Gaining credibility Rejecting ideas When and how to triage What—and what not—to test Triage and stakeholder value Offering alternatives The Last Best Build Software delivery palette Objective assessment Subjective assessment Trade-offs Getting Organized for Extreme Time Pressure Getting things done Testing the builds Smoke testing FAST: Functional Acceptance Simple Testing Focused regression testing Session-based exploratory testing Group exercises and discussions Numerous examples and case studies TW Washington, D.C. September 21, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 19, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 16, 2011 $ Identify and focus on “what really matters” $ Listen to and learn from your key context drivers $ Create practical decision-making workflows $ Dynamically prioritize testing objectives and tasks $ Triage ruthlessly to deliver the most value with limited time $ Avoid wasteful re-work when implementing and executing tests 1-Day Course Outline: Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/tup Robert Sabourin has more than 28 years of management experience, leading teams of software development professionals. A well-respected member of the software engineering community, Robert has managed, trained, mentored, and coached thousands of top professionals in the field. He frequently speaks at conferences and writes on software engineering, SQA, testing, management, and internationalization. The author of I am a Bug!, the popular software testing children’s book, Robert is an adjunct professor of Software Engineering at McGill University. Instructor Spotlight For a calendar of Live Virtual Training, go to www.sqetraining.com/VirtualTraining. Live Virtual Course Dates Public Learning Options To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com 15 Live Virtual Training Available
  16. 16. Mastering Test Design Techniques for Developing Focused Test Cases The Practical “How To’s” of Creating Test Cases After the test plans are written, the test teams formed, and the tools selected, it’s time to develop test cases and start the testing. So, what test design techniques should you use? How do you decide what tests are most important? What does a good test case look like? How can you reduce the number of tests while increasing coverage? When and how should you use white-box testing to complement black-box techniques? How can you maximize the value of exploratory testing? Mastering Test Design answers these tester questions and many more while helping test analysts develop their professional testing skills and expand their personal tester toolkit of techniques. Hands-0n Practice of Real-World Testing Techniques In this hands-on workshop, you’ll learn about and practice the most important functional, black-box testing techniques and be on your way to becoming a master test designer. The course includes student exercises covering equivalence class partitioning, boundary value analysis, decision tables, state diagrams, pair- based testing, and more. Mastering Test Design is a great opportunity to hone your test design skills, improve your effectiveness, and increase your professionalism as a test analyst. You will leave the class with a newfound confidence for designing great test cases that find important bugs sooner. Who Should Attend? This course is appropriate for both novice and experienced software testers. Developers who are expected to create test cases will find this course extremely useful. Test and development managers also can benefit from this course. A background of basic development processes and test levels is helpful but not required. Introduction Where test design fits in the testing process Elements of a good test case Test oracles Test case design trade-offs Functional—Black-box Test Techniques What is black-box testing? Black-box testing at different test levels Equivalence class partitioning Discovering and documenting partitions Partitioning complex fields Equivalence classes for multiple requirements Exercise Boundary value analysis Challenging boundary issues Exercise Decision table construction Decision tables into test cases Exercise State-transition diagrams and tables Designing tests from diagrams Exercise Pair-based test methods Exercise Exploratory and Creative Testing Exploratory testing process Creative invalids Error guessing Group insights TW Washington, D.C. September 22–23, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 20–21, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 17–18, 2011 Claire Lohr has been a professional in the computer field for more than 30 years, with the last 15 years focused on software process improvement for companies, including GTE, Motorola, Westinghouse, SAIC, Boeing, and Aetna. Claire currently provides training and consulting services for a wide variety of both government and commercial clients. Her certifications are CSQE, CSDP, and CTFL. Claire is an SEI CMM Software Capability Evaluator and a Lloyd’s Register ISO 9000 Lead Auditor. Additional instructors for this course include Lee Copeland, Dale Perry, Robert Sabourin, and Dawn Haynes. $ Learn functional, black-box test design techniques to find bugs faster $ Practice test design techniques to reinforce your new skills $ Examine experience-based testing approaches to replace ad hoc testing $ Find out when to use each test design technique for the best results 2-Day Course Outline: Instructor Spotlight Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/mtd Public eLearning Learning Options Course Accreditations Earn 15 PDUs 16 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com
  17. 17. Test Process Management Developing and Executing a Test Strategy Whether you are a test manager leading a small test team, the director managing multiple test teams, or a development manager or lead who is responsible for testing, you already know that poor testing can waste time and money—and sometimes even destroy a project or product. In this interactive, discussion-oriented course, you’ll learn about and explore what it takes to develop, maintain, and execute a successful test strategy. Rather than teaching an inflexible checklist process of “things to do” for testing, you’ll learn to think and plan the test effort based on the situations you face in your project and product—the application to test; the development environment and lifecycle; time available for testing; test resources and staff skills; risk factors; and all of the variables that should drive testing decisions. Develop a Practical Test Approach The purpose of the test approach—or strategy—is to manage and direct the test effort to a successful conclusion by finding the important defects early and providing project stakeholders with the information they need to make informed decisions. Through numerous class discussions and explorations, you’ll learn the critical success factors for developing a practical test approach and the roles that testers and test managers play in successful development projects. Manage the Test Effort from Start to Finish For a test strategy to have value, it must be skillfully implemented and updated as the project unfolds. Risks must continuously be re-evaluated based on both internal and external influences. Exit criteria must be reviewed and changed if necessary based upon the current state of the project. Find out what it takes to run a test project from early planning and resourcing, developing the tests, executing tests, reporting test results, and finally, evaluating the process. Who Should Attend? This course is appropriate for anyone who influences the direction of the testing strategy—test managers, development managers responsible for testing, test leads, senior testers—and QA analysts, test leads, and senior test engineers and analysts. Participants should have at least two years of test experience and some leadership experience or training. TW Washington, D.C. September 19–20, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 17–18, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 14–15, 2011 A consultant, lecturer, author, and former test manager, Rick Craig has led numerous teams of testers on both large and small projects. In his 25 years of consulting worldwide, Rick has advised and supported a diverse group of organizations on many testing and test management issues. From large insurance providers and telecommunications companies to smaller software services companies, he has mentored senior software managers and helped test teams improve their effectiveness. Rick is co-author of Systematic Software Testing. $ Factors critical for managing the test process $ Key roles and responsibilities of test managers in small and large organizations $ Creation and execution of a practical and dynamic Master Test Plan $ Steps to develop a prioritized set of test objectives based on risk $ Skills and approaches to manage the test effort—from start to finish Instructor Spotlight Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Testing and Quality Software quality vs. testing Class Discussion: Your organization’s culture Test levels—unit, integration, system, and acceptance Preventive testing vs. reactive testing STEP™ – Software Test and Evaluation Process Class Discussion: Can we test quality into the software? The Test Manager Roles and responsibilities of the test manager Communicating with stakeholders Class Discussion: Ways to obtain management buy-in Raising testing value proposition and profile Class Discussion: The developer-to-tester ratio Test manager attributes and skills Test Teams Attitudes and psychology of testing Class Exercise and Discussion Test team organization alternatives Keys for successful test teams Class Discussion: Handling concurrent projects Staff attributes and skills development Class Discussion: Characteristics of a good tester Configuration Management Library management Change control board Defect analysis Master Test Plan Process vs. documentation Class Discussion: Who is the audience for the Master Test Plan? What—and what not—to test Product and project risks and contingencies Class Exercise and Discussion Test approach/strategy Scheduling and estimating Class Discussion: Who sets the test schedule? Why test planning fails Testware Design Influence of risk Testers’ role in requirements The inventory process Execution Management Logging and reporting tests and incidents Failures vs. defects Class Discussion: How do you measure test effectiveness? Predicting release dates When to stop testing Tools What—and what not—to automate Class Discussion: Test tool issues Manager’s role in tool implementation Process Benchmarks and Baselines Implementing changes Process assessments Test process improvement models 2-Day Course Outline: Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/tpm Public Learning Options To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com 17 HOTTOPIC
  18. 18. Leadership for Test Managers Motivation, Productivity, Inspiration, and Job Satisfaction What is the difference between management and leadership? Are leaders born or made? If test managers can, in fact, develop leadership skills, how can you become a better—even a great—leader? Rick Craig, a retired Marine Colonel, answers these questions and many more based on his experiences in the Marine Corps and as a former test manager and test consultant to companies around the world. In this discussion-oriented workshop, you and your fellow students will explore with Rick what it means to be a leader. First, you’ll learn about the attributes of “natural” leaders and what it takes for managers to grow to become great leaders who empower their team and add significant value to their organization. Then, the class members will delve into the most pressing leadership issues and challenges that test managers face every day. You’ll begin to identify the leadership traits you already possess and learn specific things you, as a test manager or lead, can do to improve your leadership skills and help your team grow and mature. The Approach The class will begin with a brief discussion of leadership “theory”—common leadership traits, leadership style, developing trust, and leading by example. Then, Rick, you, and the other class members will explore situational leadership issues: how to gauge morale; the leader’s role as a coach, mentor, and trainer; how organizational structure and corporate culture affect leadership; leadership principles applied to software testing and development; the impact and importance of influential leaders; and more. Rick encourages you to bring your most pressing people and organizational problems to examine during the class. Working together with Rick and your peers you will discover new approaches to try and new perspectives to look at these issues. In addition to learning what it takes to improve your personal leadership skills, you’ll be able to take back specific action items to help your team improve their performance and individuals increase their job satisfaction. Who Should Attend? This course is appropriate for test managers, test leads, potential test leads and managers, and anyone who is a student of leadership. TW Washington, D.C. September 21, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 19, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 16, 2011 $ Encourage and support self-motivation within and outside your team $ Improve productivity and innovation with better leadership $ Inspire those around you to become their best $ Increase job satisfaction for your team and yourself Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Introduction What is leadership? How is leadership different from management? Are leaders made or born? Characteristics of Leadership Cornerstones of leadership Traits Qualities Style Motivation/Morale/Initiative What motivates testers? What is morale? Handling morale problems How do you maintain good morale? Principles of Leadership USMC principles Quality goals Vision statement Test policy Leading Testing Teams The test manager’s many roles Span of control Importance of influence leaders Effective delegation Testing Structures Team composition Test independence Team organization Outsourcing considerations Managing multiple teams Keys to successful teams The Leader as a Teacher Empowerment Staff development Technical skills assessment Staff selection and retention Communications Barriers to effective communications Test psychology Selling testing Corporate culture Practical advice for managers 1-Day Course Outline: Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/ltm A consultant, lecturer, author, and former test manager, Rick Craig has led numerous teams of testers on both large and small projects. In his 25 years of consulting worldwide, Rick has advised and supported a diverse group of organizations on many testing and test management issues. From large insurance providers and telecommunications companies to smaller software services companies, he has mentored senior software managers and helped test teams improve their effectiveness. Rick is co-author of Systematic Software Testing. Instructor Spotlight Public Learning Options 18 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com
  19. 19. Test Process Improvement Practical Guidelines for Small and Large Test Organizations Get a Realistic Picture of—and a Plan to Improve—Your Testing To become a great test team you not only need great testers but also a process that is optimized for your environment—business, development lifecycle, company culture, software applications, and more. Whether your test group consists of two people or two hundred, this highly interactive course delivers a practical, systematic approach to assess your current test processes and chart a course for measurable improvements. You’ll leave with new insights into how your testing compares to others and take back a customizable, step-by-step roadmap for getting better. Implementing process improvement is a difficult task and—without its own process in place—often yields nothing more than frustration for those participating. Test Process Improvement provides an excellent outline for the entire improvement process and reveals the most common “gotcha’s” that can kill the whole thing. The Approach You’ll learn how to baseline current practices against industry practices and identify the most logical and valuable areas for measurable changes within your organization. After exploring several industry process improvement models—CMMI® , TMMi® , TPI® , and TPI® Next—you’ll dive deeply into the TPI® model and learn how to use it for improving your testing. Find out when it is best to do a full-blown assessment, a less formal one, or even a self-assessment. Explore and practice data collection methods to build a baseline of current processes. Every student leaves with an understanding of exactly how to use the TPI® model and with the knowledge of its strengths and weaknesses. The class explores strategies for successfully implementing changes and making them permanent. Who Should Attend? This course equips test managers, QA managers, test team leads, software managers, test consultants, and IT improvement specialists with the tools and skills they need to plan for and conduct a structured test process assessment and improvement initiative. Introduction Typical complaints about testing Improving the testing process Position and scope of test process improvement The process of change Improvement Process Awareness Goal, scope, and approach Develop the assessment tool Define improvement actions Plan the improvement project Implement change Evaluate results and adjust The Test Process Improvement (TPI® ) Model Relationship to CMMI® Relationship to TPI® Next Assessment Twenty key areas Maturity levels Checkpoints Improvement suggestions Test Maturity Matrix explained Order of improvements Improvement Actions Objectives Findings Recommendations Take-Home Bonus Each public course participant receives a copy of the book, Test Process Improvement: A Practical Step-by-Step Guide to Structured Testing, by Tim Koomen and Martin Pol. Valid for public courses only. TW San Francisco, CA October 20, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 17, 2011 $ Baseline your current testing practices using a standard process model $ Benchmark current practices against industry practices $ Identify high payback process improvement opportunities $ Develop measurable objectives and milestones for improvement $ Avoid killer process improvement pitfalls 1-Day Course Outline: Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/tpi A consultant, lecturer, author, and former test manager, Rick Craig has led numerous teams of testers on both large and small projects. In his 25 years of consulting worldwide, Rick has advised and supported a diverse group of organizations on many testing and test management issues. From large insurance providers and telecommunications companies to smaller software services companies, he has mentored senior software managers and helped test teams improve their effectiveness. Rick is co-author of Systematic Software Testing. Additional instructors for this course include Lee Copeland and Martin Pol. Instructor Spotlight Public Learning Options To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com 19
  20. 20. 20 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Testing with Use Cases Using the Use Case Model in Test Analysis and Design Understanding the Use Case Model The use case model is a very useful tool for gathering, defining, and documenting the functional requirements of a system or application. In many organizations, it has taken the place of the classic many hundred-page requirements document. As a tester, you need to understand the general characteristics of the use case model, its strengths and weaknesses, and most importantly, how it is being used in the project on which you are working. Several different styles of use cases are used in system development, and you need to be knowledgeable about them. Testing the Use Cases As requirements, documented in a use case model, are being created, testers help ensure that the use case model is complete, correct, and consistent. Early discovery of defects in the model and in specific use cases will prevent defects from being introduced into the design and code. Testing Based on Use Cases Once use cases are tested, then the system or application is built from them. The use case model becomes the basis for functional testing. Testers analyze the details of each use case and create one or more test cases that will be used to verify that the design and code are correct. Who Should Attend? This course is appropriate for anyone involved in using the use case model for software development. Novice and experienced software testers—as well as developers, test and development managers, customers, and project managers—can benefit from this course. A background of basic development processes is helpful but not essential. TW Washington, D.C. September 21, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 19, 2011 Dale Perry has more than thirty-four years of experience in information technology as a programmer/analyst, database administrator, project manager, development manager, tester, and test manager. Dale’s project experience includes large system development and conversions, distributed systems, and both web-based and client/server applications. A professional instructor for more than twenty years, he has presented at numerous industry conferences on development and testing. With Software Quality Engineering for fifteen years, Dale has specialized in training and consulting on testing, inspections and reviews, and other testing and quality-related topics. $ Understand the basics of the use case model $ Learn the strengths and limits of use cases from a testing perspective $ Learn how to assess specific use cases for correctness and completeness $ Learn how use cases become the basis of test analysis and test design $ Learn a flexible approach to early test design using use cases as a basis Instructor Spotlight Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Introduction to Use Cases Basic concepts Focus Benefits Understanding the use case model Concepts, notation, and formats General concerns Testing Use Cases Testing the use case model Domain testing Traceability testing Syntax testing From Use Cases to Test Cases Example use case Actors—secondary and sub-actors Actors and their goals Examining a use case for key test issues Main elements Description Scenarios Alternatives and exceptions Dealing with ambiguity in use cases Using test techniques to assess use cases and scenarios Developing test objectives from use cases Designing the test cases Wrap-up and Summary 1-Day Course Outline: Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/tuc Public Learning Options
  21. 21. Test Estimation and Measurement What, When, Where, and How to Estimate and Measure within Testing The Test Manager’s Role in Measurement In many ways, the most important value of testing is providing timely and accurate information to project stakeholders. As a by-product of testing efforts, test managers—and lead testers—need to continually measure and report the status and quality of the product under development. They also need to measure test effectiveness as a guide for improvement. Test managers make and revise test effort estimates and help determine when to stop testing and release the product. These are all examples of test metrics. Because a key component of testing is to measure the quality of the software product, test managers and testers also collect data and report metrics related to the entire software development activity. Estimation in Practice Almost anyone who has ever attempted to develop an estimate about software realizes just how difficult the task can be. The number of factors that can affect the estimate is virtually without limit. The key to good estimates is to understand the main variables, compare them to known standards, and normalize the estimates based upon their differences. This is easy to say but difficult to accomplish because estimates are frequently required when very little is known about the project and what is known is constantly changing. Throw in a healthy dose of politics and a bit of wishful thinking and estimation can become a nightmare for software practitioners—and testers. Who Should Attend? This course provides a background in estimation for anyone who must estimate software development or testing efforts (and that should cover almost everyone!). Analysts, developers, leads, test managers, testers, and QA personnel can all benefit from this course. Introduction to Software Measurement What is measurement? Why is measurement important? What makes a good metric? Measurement Rules of Thumb The human element Obtaining buy-in—management and staff The Hawthorne Effect Use of subjective metrics Test Manager’s Dashboard Quality of the product Project and test status Test effectiveness Resources metrics Outstanding issues Test Estimation What is estimation? Who should perform estimation? What should be estimated? Estimating Axioms Estimation Techniques Work breakdown Team estimates (Wideband Delphi) Three-point estimates Company standards and norms Percent of project effort Story point sizing Poker estimation Wrap-up and Discussion TW Washington, D.C. September 22, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 20, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 17, 2011 $ Understand the test team’s and tester’s role in software estimation and measurement $ Develop the right measures for your project and organization $ Create a custom Test Metrics Dashboard $ Learn how to estimate in the face of uncertainty $ Avoid dysfunctional metrics for sustainable measurement programs 1-Day Course Outline: Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Public Learning Options Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/tem 21To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com A consultant, lecturer, author, and former test manager, Rick Craig has led numerous teams of testers on both large and small projects. In his 25 years of consulting worldwide, Rick has advised and supported a diverse group of organizations on many testing and test management issues. From large insurance providers and telecommunications companies to smaller software services companies, he has mentored senior software managers and helped test teams improve their effectiveness. Rick is co-author of Systematic Software Testing. Robert Sabourin is an additional instructor for this course. Instructor Spotlight
  22. 22. 22 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Just-In-Time Software Testing Workshop Powerful Tools for Fast-Changing Projects and Priorities Dealing with Software Project Turbulence Turbulent development projects experience almost daily requirements changes, user interface modifications, and the continual integration of new functions, features, and technologies. Keep your testing efforts on track while reacting to changing priorities, technologies, and user needs. This interactive workshop offers a unique set of tools to help you cope with—and perhaps even flourish in—what may seem to be a totally chaotic environment. Practice dynamic test planning, test idea development, and test triage. Getting Ready for Almost Anything They Can Throw at You Learn to identify, organize, and prioritize your testing “ideas.” Adapt the testing focus as priorities change. Decide on purpose—what not to test not just because the clock ran out! Real Techniques Proven in Real Projects Just-In-Time Testing (JIT) approaches are successfully applied to many types of software projects— commercial off-the-shelf applications, agile and iterative development environments, mission-critical business systems, and just about any Web application. Real examples demonstrate how JIT testing either replaces or complements more traditional approaches. Examples are drawn from insurance, banking, telecommunications, medical, and other industries. The course is packed with interactive exercises in which students work together in small groups to apply JIT testing concepts. Who Should Attend? This course is appropriate for anyone who works in fast-paced development environments, including test engineers, test managers, developers, QA engineers, and all software managers. TW Washington, D.C. September 23, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 21, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 18, 2011 $ Identify and collect important test ideas from varied sources $ Test projects with few or no written requirements $ “Triage” testing to find important bugs more quickly $ Organize testing in a dynamic, unpredictable world Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Introduction Testing as soon as possible Testing as late as possible Basis for just in time testing Be prepared—what you need Exercise: Nature of testing Test Ideas Testing ideas—what to test Usage scenarios and data Requirements and design documents Failure modes Capabilities and domains Quality factors Creative techniques Exercise: Creative test idea generation Focus Planning and Prioritization What not to test Consequences and benefits of skipping Consequence of implementing Refactoring tests Testing triage Adapting to project context for triage Exercise: Testing triage practice session 1-Day Course Outline: Public Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/jiw Learning Options Robert Sabourin has more than 28 years of management experience, leading teams of software development professionals. A well-respected member of the software engineering community, Robert has managed, trained, mentored, and coached thousands of top professionals in the field. He frequently speaks at conferences and writes on software engineering, SQA, testing, management, and internationalization. The author of I am a Bug!, the popular software testing children’s book, Robert is an adjunct professor of Software Engineering at McGill University. Instructor Spotlight NEW
  23. 23. Performance,Load, and Stress Testing Workshop Issues and Solutions for Verifying Software Performance Goals and Objectives In the Real World This course provides an introduction to the complexities of software performance testing and delivers testing skills that participants can immediately apply back on the job. Using a real-world case study, you will encounter issues, decisions, and testing experiences comparable to those in your own work environment. Working through a series of discussion-based exercises—individually, in small teams, or as a group—you develop a workable strategy for performance testing an application/system. The focus of the exercises is on analysis of a situation and understanding the planning and design issues associated with performance testing. This course does not focus on problem analysis, tuning, debugging, or tools. Who Should Attend? System testers, system designers, system tuners, software engineers, quality assurance professionals, and project leaders who are involved in systems testing can benefit from this course. A working knowledge of system testing and quality assurance fundamentals is assumed, but no specific technical background (e.g., UNIX, TCP/IP) is required. This course is for beginning to intermediate skill levels relating to software performance testing. This is not an advanced course dealing with specific tuning and assessment issues. Fundamentals Imperative to performance test Performance testing track record Performance Testing Process Understanding how performance testing fits the development process Approaches to the performance testing process Costs of performance testing Identify Performance Goals and Business Goals Gather background information on the situation Develop an understanding of the situation Validate the test project need and feasibility Exercise: Understanding Goals Infrastructure and Architecture for the Test What must be part of the test? What can be omitted? Key Areas of Infrastructure/ Architecture Target platform and systems Network configuration Scalability and extrapolation Exercise: Assessing infrastructure issues Designing the Test Defining the workload (Operations Profile) Transactions to be simulated Analyze factors affecting the load definition Exercise: Calculating load characteristics Types of performance tests to be run Exercise: Selecting types of tests to run Response times, resource usage, etc. Test Preparation Set up the test infrastructure/architecture Acquire the test scripts and data Set up the tools Test Execution Validate the tests and the tools Prepare for the test execution Execute the tests and collect the data Present conclusions and recommendations Assist the technical team after tuning and debugging Reporting Performance Test Results TW Washington, D.C. September 22–23, 2011 TW San Francisco, CA October 20–21, 2011 TW Tampa, FL November 17–18, 2011 $ Understand the performance testing process: planning, preparation, execution, and reporting $ Relate performance testing to the development process $ Understand performance goals and objectives $ Learn how to deal with environment and architecture issues $ Define operational profiles and load definitions $ Understand and select the various types of performance tests $ Define and select appropriate measurements 2-Day Course Outline: Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/plt Public Learning Options To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com 23 Dale Perry has more than thirty-four years of experience in information technology as a programmer/analyst, database administrator, project manager, development manager, tester, and test manager. Dale’s project experience includes large system development and conversions, distributed systems, and both web-based and client/server applications. A professional instructor for more than twenty years, he has presented at numerous industry conferences on development and testing. With Software Quality Engineering for fifteen years, Dale has specialized in training and consulting on testing, inspections and reviews, and other testing and quality-related topics. Instructor Spotlight HOTTOPIC
  24. 24. 24 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com Finding Ambiguities in Requirements Techniques for Improving Requirements and Software Studies have shown that poor requirements are one of the most significant contributors to project failure— and half of all defects have their origin in bad requirements. If specifications are ambiguous, there is nearly a 100% chance that there will be one or more defects in the corresponding code. Techniques for Quickly Reviewing Requirements for Ambiguities Finding Ambiguities in Requirements explores ways to review specifications quickly and quantitatively to identify what is unclear about them. This powerful, yet practical, method helps you ensure that requirements documentation is clear, concise, and unambiguous. Learn about and practice simple, effective review techniques that can reduce the ambiguity rate by 95% on subsequent specifications. In addition you’ll learn to determine if the requirements are detailed enough to produce a sufficient set of test cases to validate the system’s functionality. To reinforce lectures and discussions, you’ll practice your newly acquired knowledge and skills in classroom exercises. You can apply these same techniques to design specifications, user manuals, training materials, and online help, as well as agreements and contracts for software development projects. Who Should Attend? This course is intended to help those who write and review functional requirements and those who develop and test systems based on those requirements. The audience includes business analysts, test analysts, requirements engineers, developers, technical writers, and project managers. No specific prerequisites are assumed. Introduction Definition of good requirements Testable requirements Deterministic results and requirements Confusing Constructs Limitations of the English language Examples of ambiguity Ambiguity review checklist Performing an ambiguity review Exercise: Identify ambiguities in various mini-specs Jargon and Complexity The language barrier Carelessness Assumed functional knowledge Exercise: Translate jargon into plain English Unnecessary complexity Exercise: Simplify overly complex writing Defining Clear Objectives Objectives vs. requirements Quantitative vs. qualitative objectives Identifying the objectives of all stakeholders Product vs. project objectives Templates for the objectives specification Exercise: Identify the true objectives Introduction to Writing Testable Requirements Alternative styles Guidelines for writing clear specifications Summary of how ambiguities are addressed Introduction to Requirements- based Testing Quality filters Advantages of rigorous testing Using test cases to validate requirements TW Tampa, FL November 14, 2011 $ Practice performing ambiguity reviews on requirements documents $ Improve requirements and reduce errors in software $ Design the right tests with clear and unambiguous requirements $ Take back a practical ambiguity review checklist 1-Day Course Outline: Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/far Richard Bender has more than 40 years of experience in software with a primary focus on testing and quality assurance. He has consulted internationally to large and small corporations, government agencies, and the military. Richard’s work has included a wide variety of application classes and technology bases from embedded systems to super computer-based systems—and everything in between—consulting to both vendors and IT departments alike. He has been active in establishing industry standards for software quality and is a frequent speaker at conferences, universities, and corporate events. For his breakthroughs on code-based testing, Richard was one of the first programmers ever awarded IBM’s Outstanding Invention Award. Additional instructors for this course include Bill Lewis and Gary Mogyorodi. Instructor Spotlight Public Learning Options Live Virtual Training Available For a calendar of Live Virtual Training, go to www.sqetraining.com/VirtualTraining. Live Virtual Course Dates
  25. 25. Richard Bender has more than 40 years of experience in software with a primary focus on testing and quality assurance. He has consulted internationally to large and small corporations, government agencies, and the military. Richard’s work has included a wide variety of application classes and technology bases from embedded systems to super computer-based systems—and everything in between—consulting to both vendors and IT departments alike. He has been active in establishing industry standards for software quality and is a frequent speaker at conferences, universities, and corporate events. For his breakthroughs on code-based testing, Richard was one of the first programmers ever awarded IBM’s Outstanding Invention Award. Additional instructors for this course include Bill Lewis and Gary Mogyorodi. Instructor Spotlight Writing Testable Requirements Higher Productivity and Quality with Clear and Actionable Requirements Clear, actionable, accurate, and complete requirements are a key component for having productive teams and high quality software—whether your development lifecycle employs detailed requirements specs, agile story cards, or something in between. Without testable requirements, there is no real way to ensure that you are developing the “right” software— software that will meet the needs and expectations of customers and users. Just as important, testable requirements are the basis for designing and executing tests to confirm that the software does what it’s supposed to do. Focus Up-Front on Problem Avoidance The hands-on Writing Testable Requirements course focuses on problem avoidance before coding starts— how to write requirements accurately the first time and ensure that the product will meet your organization’s needs. Learn practical guidelines for describing processes and data within software specifications. Then, practice writing requirements statements that have the clarity and the necessary detail to become the basis for developing test cases. You can apply these techniques to any requirements documentation format—company or industry standards—and use them within automated requirements repositories. Bring samples from your own projects to work on and evaluate during class. Who Should Attend? This course is intended to help those who write and review functional requirements—and those who develop and test systems based on those requirements. The audience includes business analysts, test analysts, requirements engineers, developers, and project managers. Finding Ambiguities in Requirements is a prerequisite for this class. TW Tampa, FL November 15–16, 2011 $ Ensure that requirements reflect goals and objectives of customers and users $ Write clear and actionable requirements statements the first time $ Verify that requirements are explicit, quantifiable, and understandable $ Identify and avoid missing and incorrect requirements $ Reduce the time and cost to deliver the right software $ Reduce errors, rework, and frustration Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Why Good Requirements Are Critical Impact on costs of development Impact on schedules Characteristics of testable requirements Common Requirements Issues Identifying all classes of requirements Identifying the major requirements components Organizing the requirements specification/ database Ensuring sufficient detail in the requirements templates Writing Style Guidelines and Practices Naming conventions Documenting data stores and data flows Clarifying the boundary between requirements and design Creating the initial process model—clarifying scope Exercise: Create an initial process model for the class project Documenting use cases, functions, and external entities Ensuring readability without ambiguity Making requirements explicit instead of implicit The four building blocks of decision logic Reducing complexity in decision rules Documenting simple and complex transforms Exercise: Rewrite ambiguous specifications Impact of design and technology on requirements Difference between structured English and pseudo-code Exercise: Write the detailed requirements for the class project Tuning the Requirements Process Rapid prototyping and RAD Agile methodologies New development Maintenance Third-party packages Technology conversions, rewrites, and re-engineering Automated Requirements Management RM tools as a requirements database Migrating from documents to requirements databases Moving beyond simple version control and traceability Key features to support ambiguity reviews Building templates into RM tools Building automatic verification into RM tools Requirements optimization wizards 2-Day Course Outline: Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/wtr Public Learning Options To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com 25
  26. 26. Requirements-Based Testing A Disciplined Approach for Designing, Maintaining, and Executing Tests If your testing efforts are not achieving the payback you and your organization expect, this course is for you. Requirements-Based Testing (RBT) delivers a proven, rigorous approach for designing a consistent and repeatable set of highly optimized test cases. Companies employing RBT practices have achieved twice the requirements coverage with only half the tests they previously maintained. Design the Test Library The RBT process helps you validate that the requirements are clear and complete. Then, it guides you to define a set of tests verifying that the design and code fully meet those requirements. You’ll learn and practice cause-effect graphing, a test design technique that ensures that defects will be fully observable. If there are any defects in the software—even ones that could be hidden from tests by other errors—cause- effect graphing will find them. With this technique, you’ll be able to reduce the number of tests you need and make sure that every test is valuable. Explore alternative test design techniques and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Learn how to complement functional, black-box testing with code-based, white-box testing to further ensure complete coverage and higher quality. Classroom exercises are employed throughout the course to reinforce your learning. Leave with a Testing Process that Integrates with the Development Lifecycle Take back a lifecycle testing process that incorporates testing as an integrated—and integral—part of the software development project. With the RBT process, your next project will experience significant time and cost savings while helping the test team develop better estimates and dynamically track test and project progress. Bring samples from your own projects to work on and evaluate during class. Who Should Attend? Requirements-Based Testing is for test managers, test engineers, QA specialists, software managers, and anyone responsible for developing tests and test suites. Finding Ambiguities in Requirements is a prerequisite for this class. Although the focus of this course is on process and techniques, there will be a brief introduction to the BenderRBT™ software tool, which automates much of the requirements-based testing process. Introduction Making the business case for quality Definitions of testing The twelve-step RBT test approach Initial RBT Steps Validating requirements against objectives Validating the scope of requirements using scenarios and tours Exercise: Identifying scenarios Cause-effect Graphing Basic logical operators Exercise: Identifying variables, states, and relations Five graphing constructs of functional requirements Exercise: Create cause-effect graphs for numerous requirements Data Constraints Boundary condition data constraints Processing sequence imposed constraints Exercise: Determine what constraints apply Inconsistencies in processing rules Exercise: Determine why the requirements are logically inconsistent Test Case Design from Graphs Strategies for test case design Concept of fault detection Identifying functional variations Exercise: Determine the required functional variations to test Packaging functional variations into test cases Exercise: Complete the test designs from the variations Alternative Test Designs Equivalence class testing Exercise: Determine the states to tests Review of other model-based testing techniques Optimized pairs and orthogonal pairs Exercise: Design tests using optimized pairs Comparing the various test design approaches Points of Integration Integrating testing throughout development Developing user acceptance tests before coding starts Code-based Testing White-box test completion criteria Data flow-based testing Integrating black-box and white-box testing Management Considerations Planning and estimating guidelines Change control Test team organization Tracking the testing effort Contract management Test Automation Test automation issues How the RBT process integrates with the rest of test automation TW Tampa, FL November 17–18, 2011 Richard Bender has more than 40 years of experience in software with a primary focus on testing and quality assurance. He has consulted internationally to large and small corporations, government agencies, and the military. Richard’s work has included a wide variety of application classes and technology bases from embedded systems to super computer-based systems—and everything in between—consulting to both vendors and IT departments alike. He has been active in establishing industry standards for software quality and is a frequent speaker at conferences, universities, and corporate events. For his breakthroughs on code-based testing, Richard was one of the first programmers ever awarded IBM’s Outstanding Invention Award. Gary Mogyorodi is an additional instructor for this course. $ Develop and maintain efficient tests that cover all functional requirements $ Design test cases that force defects to appear early in testing $ Learn and practice cause-effect graphing to design more robust tests $ Learn and practice alternative test design approaches—pairwise, equivalence class $ Optimize and reduce the size of your test suite $ Integrate testing in the software development lifecycle 2-Day Course Outline: Instructor Spotlight Public Course Dates TW Indicates a Training Week course. See page 3 for details. Course Link: www.sqetraining.com/rbt Public Learning Options 26 To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com
  27. 27. Attend Live, Instructor-Led Classes Via Your Computer. Live Virtual Package Includes: • Easy course access: You attend training right from your computer and communication is handled by a phone conference bridge utilizing Cisco’s WebEx technology. That means you can access your training course quickly and easily and participate freely. • Live, expert instruction: See and hear your instructor presenting the course materials and answering your questions in real-time. • Valuable course materials: Our live virtual training uses the same valuable course materials as our classroom training. Students will have direct access to the course materials. • Hands-on exercises: An essential component to any learning experience is applying what you have learned. Using the latest technology, your instructor can provide students with hands-on exercises, group activities, and breakout sessions. • Real-time communication: Communicate real-time directly with the instructor. Ask questions, provide comments, and participate in the class discussions. • Peer interaction: Networking with peers has always been a valuable part of any classroom training. Live virtual training gives you the opportunity to interact with and learn from the other attendees during breakout sessions, course lecture, and QA. • Convenient schedule: Course instruction is divided into modules no longer than three hours per day. This schedule makes it easy for you to get the training you need without taking days out of the office and setting aside projects. • Small class size: Live virtual courses are limited to the same small class sizes as our instructor-led training. This provides you with the opportunity for personal interaction with the instructor. To register, call 888.268.8770 or 904.278.0524 • www.sqetraining.com • On-site training information, email onsitetraining@sqe.com 27 NEW Live Virtual Courses: »» Testing Under Pressure »» Performance, Load, and Stress Testing »» Getting Requirements Right the First Time »» Essential Test Management and Planning »» Finding Ambiguities in Requirements »» Mastering Test Automation »» Agile Test Automation »» Generating Great Testing Ideas »» and More

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