Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Otto Freijser - Perpetulon - Lean Startup Night Warsaw - Feb 13th, 2018

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 121 Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Similaire à Otto Freijser - Perpetulon - Lean Startup Night Warsaw - Feb 13th, 2018 (20)

Publicité

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

Otto Freijser - Perpetulon - Lean Startup Night Warsaw - Feb 13th, 2018

  1. 1. Otto Freijser Scaling Lean Startup in an Enterprise
  2. 2. Otto Freijser Lean Startup Evangelist / Coach @ofreijser
  3. 3. Sparking entrepreneurial action Partner at: enjoy helping teams in organisations such as:
  4. 4. Standing on the shoulders of Giants ☺
  5. 5. Lean Startup for corporate s?
  6. 6. WE START WITH A VISION
  7. 7. WE PROCEED WITHOUT VALIDATING
  8. 8. Traditional product development process Develop technology / product Create Marketing Position Create Sales Plan Bring to Market
  9. 9. Dr. Robert G. Cooper. “Doing It Right.” Product Development Institute. 2006 77% Frost & Sullivan. “Growth Process Toolkit: New Product Development.” 2008 0.3% Frost & Sullivan. “Growth Process Toolkit: New Product Development,” 2008. 1% Andrew Campbell and Robert Park. “Stop Kissing Frogs.” Harvard Business Review. July-August 2004. 1% Dr. John Sviokla. “The Calculus of Commerce.” DiamondCluster International. 2004 3% Corporate Strategy Board. “Stall Points” 1998. Cited in Clayton Christensen and Michal Raynor “The Innovator’s Solution.” page 5. 5% Andrew Campbell and Robert Park. “Stop Kissing Frogs.” Harvard Business Review. July-August 2004. 10% Kevin Clancy and Randy Stone. “Don’t Blame the Metrics.” Harvard Business Review. June 2005. 10% Corporate Strategy Board. “Overcoming Stall Points.” 2006. 10% PricewaterhouseCoopers. “Shaking the Money Tree.” Slide 33. US Venture Liquidity, 2001-2007. Q3 2008. 11%
  10. 10. Average: 17% of product introductions are successful
  11. 11. 17
  12. 12. WE CAN’T AFFORD TO MISS THE TARGET
  13. 13. NO DRAMATIC FAILURES
  14. 14. WE CAN LEARN FROM STARTUPS
  15. 15. - Steve Blank "A startup is not a smaller version of a big organisation."
  16. 16. "A human institution designed to create a new product or service under conditions of extreme uncertainty." Eric Ries
  17. 17. How do you create a blockbuster new product? Develop technology / product Create Marketing Position Create Sales Plan Bring to MarketXXXX
  18. 18. No business plan survives first contact with customers!
  19. 19. 66% Changes their original plan – drastically
  20. 20. Search Execution Goal: Find a repeatable and scalable business. (internal) startup. Goal: Execute on a given business, financial, and operating plan. Process driven hierarchy.
  21. 21. Analysis Requirement Specification Design Development Testing and Integration Implementation / Deployment Goal: Find a repeatable and scaleable business Search Execution
  22. 22. LIFE’S TOO SHORT... TO BUILD SOMETHING NOBODY
  23. 23. In large companies, the mistakes just have additional zeros in them Steve Blank
  24. 24. Customer discovery Customer validation Search Problem / Solution Fit Product / Market Fit Pivot Growth Hacking Company Building Execute
  25. 25. You learn by doing You can't learn kung-fu by watching Bruce Lee movies
  26. 26. We use Lean Startup as a set of tools, principles and behaviours that will… Get you closer to customers Increase your speed to market Increase the chance of succes Make it easier to get things done
  27. 27. “Lean startup is a basic philosophy that systematically identifies risk in a business model and designs research and experimental methods to bring more certainty to the business. We do this through rapid iteration of our business model.” Tristan Kromer TRIKRO.com
  28. 28. Build Measure Learn (BML) Learn Build Meas ure Plan A assumptions Every loop consists of one or more experiments
  29. 29. Reverse the loop Learn Build Meas ure Plan A assumptions 1. What do we need to learn? 2. What data or information
 do we measure to learn this? 3. What do we need to build to
 get the data we want to measure.
  30. 30. So, how do we apply 
 this to our corporate 
 world?
  31. 31. O u r f i r s t e i g h t i d U n a c c e p t a Speedboat Managers
  32. 32. T o t a l l y b r a n d n e n ’ t h a v e p r e c e d e n c e f o r t Speedboat Lawyers
  33. 33. W i l l y o u s p o n s o r o u r n O h , n o , n o . T h a t ’ s n o t i Speedboat Business Unit
  34. 34. C a n w e h a v e s o m W h a t ’ s y o u r 5 y e a r Speedboat Finance We made it up Denied.
  35. 35. 50 STARTUP ENDUP How do you become big without breaking? Install an ‘OS’, that assumes that you are wrong “Duh” – Peter Senge
  36. 36. ”New Corporate” = Ambidextrous / Dual-core + Combining Search (Speed) & Execution (Efficiency) A ? A B Startup = Speedboot Corporate = Oil tanker
  37. 37. Fast Scaling Organize for Innovation
  38. 38. Fast Scaling Organize for Innovation
  39. 39. INNOVATION STAGES VISIONING GOVERNANCE EXPLORE EXPERIMENT
  40. 40. Macro economic Forces Industry forces Market Forces Key Trends Company Goal / Way to PlayVisioning
  41. 41. A B,C,D, ETC? A B
  42. 42. THREE HORIZONS OF INNOVATION Goals Scope Unscertainties Approach Unique Products Growht Options HIGH R&D Unique Products High Business value MED R&D Products Current Business LOW R&D
  43. 43. Supporting innovation project teams
  44. 44. Innovation Accounting AAARR VS Execution Financial KPI
  45. 45. measure relevant progress
  46. 46. Stage gated funding
  47. 47. don’t DO Innovation, manage the Innovation Funnel
  48. 48. When will you get to revenue? What is your 5 year proforma? When is it ready to launch? How much revenue will you get? Questions that should never be asked
  49. 49. (Much) better questions ☺ What is your vision with this project? How big is the market you are approaching? Which elements of your business model have you validated? Which require further exploration? Do you have a launching customer in mind? Is this 10x better than what is currently out there, if not yet how can we make it 10x better?
  50. 50. EMPOWER more teams to launch more, earlier and smaller….
  51. 51. Cool Solution Customer Customer Customer Customer Customer X X X X X ☹€ € € Solution-first Thinking
  52. 52. Cool Customer Problem Problem Problem X X ☺Problem Solution X SolutionSolution € € Lean Customer Development
  53. 53. Turn assumptions into facts and data points
  54. 54. Systematically testing Business model assumptions
  55. 55. Launch a Minimum Viable Ecosystem DEFINE AND DESIGN MINIMUM VIABLE ECOSYSTEM And learn what works and what doesn’t, by starting small with only the minimum viable requirements to allow 2-3 teams to run through one cycle of the Validation Loop, minimizing waste and maximising speed of learning.
  56. 56. Launch a Minimum Viable Ecosystem SUPPORT VALIDATION SPRINTS
  57. 57. Launch a Minimum Viable Ecosystem DRIVE CONTINOUS ITERATION
  58. 58. NO YES Status Focus Duration Metrics Scale Idea Explore Validate Grow Sustain Retire Search for Business Model Execute against Business Model Early Adopters Early Majority, Late Majority, Laggards Weeks Year(s)Days Months Customer Development, Innovation Accounting, Lean Analytics, Pirate Metrics Revenues, Profit-Margins, ROI, IRR, NPV Understand what to focus on and when in the Product Lifecycle Company BuildingMarket Discovery Process
  59. 59. Fast Scaling Organize for Innovation
  60. 60. A Revolution At Work Learning organizations adopt a learn by doing approach, have a bias for action, and design for reflection and iteration. Open organizations make information easily accessible and open to all. Everyone has the information they need at all times. Networked organizations enable people to work easily in teams that cut across functions and geographies, and even extend beyond the formal boundaries of the organization. 79
  61. 61. - so firstly, Spotify organise their teams in a super interesting way. - they have very fluid structures where teams are organised in to chapters, squads and guilds. - the design here is all about enabling a culture which is product and user focused first, and encouraging people from different teams to have very grey edges to the roles they perform.
  62. 62. - Zappos, are another company who demonstrate a very innovative post bureaucratic culture. - They’re incredibly people focused, both obesessionally about their customer but also in realising that their culture is their brand. - This book, is their 2014 culture book. You can download it for free online. - Each year they publish this, which is co-written by all the staff, as a manifesto for the values and culture that they believe in. - - Inside you’ll find stuff about their core values and vision, their flat self organising structure, notes from new joiners on what joining Zappos has done for them, and a real sense of purpose and mission about where the company is going next.
  63. 63. - It would’ve been hard to touch on innovative culture without mentioning google - this slide is taken from a great deck I’d recommend you take a look at on slide share called ‘How Google Works’ and it’s a very astute google like observation - It simply says ‘innovation can’t be owned or ordained, it needs to be allowed. You can’t tell innovative people to be innovative, but you can let them’. - And it’s thinking like that from Eric Schmidt and the team at Google that has really enabled them to scale this entrepreneurial, inquisitive mindset throughout their teams.
  64. 64. - I love this example of post bureaucratic thinking from Nordstrom - This is a company with 67,000 employees and this is there employee handbook. All of it. - So on one side it says employee handbook and on the other it say ‘our one rule. Use good judgment in all situations’. - I think this is a real demonstration of a company who are trying to drive culture by focusing on value, not policies.
  65. 65. HAVE A SHARED PURPOSE ORGANIZE AS LEAN, X-FUNCTIONAL TEAMS DISTRIBUTE 
 AUTHORITY OPERATE ON A RHYTHM WORK IN SPRINTS PATTERNS IN TODAY’S MOST CAPABLE TEAMS MEET WITH PURPOSE STEER DYNAMICALLY VALUE CONSENT (NOT CONSENSUS) DEFAULT TO OPEN HAVE EDITABLE RULES CULTIVATE PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY RITUALIZE LEARNING + REFLECTION
  66. 66. ORGANIZED TO EXECUTE ORGANIZED TO LEARN HIRING Conformers, Rule followers Creative problem solvers, experimenters TRAINING Learn before you do Learn from doing MEASURING PERFORMANCE Did you do it right? Did we learn? ORG STRUCTURE Silos & separated expertise Cross-functional, integrated expertise PROCESS GOALS Drive out variance Use variance to adapt and improve Source: “Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate, and Compete in the Knowledge Economy”, by Amy C. Edmondson
  67. 67. If we can build a great team, we can build a great organization. Team
  68. 68. Innovators Or Innovations?
  69. 69. Mindset ToolsetSkillset
  70. 70. Ownership (80%)
  71. 71. Never Give Up (20%)
  72. 72. Hacker HipsterHustler
  73. 73. HELPER The person who gets down to business and get's stuff done. They are true teamplayers and are masters in managing conflict, they are the glue of the team, who enjoy putting their skills in service of making things happen. HACKER The one most likely to sit quietly through a board meeting until uttering the three sentences that answers the all important question of "how?" the new idea can be brought into reality.
  74. 74. Bring in outsiders to join a team
  75. 75. Toolset Lean Startup Growth Hacking Value Proposition Canvas Pitch Training Customer Development Online collaboration & e-learning Business Model Canvas MVP Team Composition Stakeholder Management Design Thinking Jobs to be Done
  76. 76. Practices that shift Mindsets
  77. 77. Fast Scaling Organize for Innovation
  78. 78. EXPLORE EXPERIMENT
  79. 79. AGILE Sprint Weekly demo & retrospectiveSprint KANBANExperiment backlog 1 week 24 hr Daily standup B M L Learnings & next steps
  80. 80. Our success at Amazon is a function of how many experiments we do per year, per month, per week, per day… Jeff Bezos CEO and Founder Amazon
  81. 81. How certain are you? Closed ControlledEfficient Open NetworkLearning PurposePurpose Assumes that you’re RIGHT Assumes that you’re probably WRONG INDUSTRIAL RESPONSIVE
  82. 82. Also applying to your Ecosystem Design
  83. 83. Nurturing Innovation takes time
  84. 84. Adaptive Culture
 Is all about making change work
  85. 85. Imagine your corporate culture as a garden
  86. 86. 112 STARTUP ENDUP Install an ‘OS’, that assumes that you are wrong “Duh” – Peter Senge
  87. 87. Bringing it all together
  88. 88. Ideas aren’t facts
  89. 89. It’s all about the team
  90. 90. Fail fast & often!
  91. 91. Before launch: “Fluffy expectations land”
  92. 92. After launch: “Bad mean reality”
  93. 93. Also, you most of the time have no idea what your doing……
  94. 94. It needs practices and training!!
  95. 95. Any questions? www.perpetulon.com @ofreijser otto.freijser@perpetulon.com

×