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GMEI 2017: Global Mobile Engagement Index

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GMEI 2017: Global Mobile Engagement Index

  1. 1. © GSMA Intelligence gsmaintelligence.com • info@gsmaintelligence.com • @GSMAi GSMA Intelligence GMEI 2017 Global Mobile Engagement Index Supplementary data publication February 2017
  2. 2. Summary 1 GMEI summary and findings Understanding regional consumer behaviour 2 Moving to smarter devices Mobile technology innovation is driving user engagement, but in some countries it is not the end game. 3 Living in a ‘data first’ world IP-comms continues to change the way we communicate, but mobile data services consumption varies by region. 4 Early adopters on the rise The next generational demographic shifts will change the profile of tomorrow’s mobile consumers. 5 Consumer segmentation, regional trends i Introduction ii Methodology outline iii Global mobile consumer trends summary iv Regional mobile consumer trends summary v Global mobile user engagement – top 10 insights vi Global Mobile Engagement Index – ranking vii Five key market factors are powering mobile user engagement viii The relationship between user engagement and data revenue can be asymmetric ix Higher mobile user engagement does not ensure faster data revenue growth x Consumer survey inputs: 29 mobile use cases were covered to build the index xi Consumer segmentation – key characteristics xii The average consumer profile varies by region xiii How is consumer behaviour going to change by region? xiv Tomorrow’s consumer will be more connected and more engaged in advanced data services xv GMEI methodology Data insights Appendix
  3. 3. 3 | GMEI summary and findings Introduction Introducing a new indicator that offers a new perspective on mobile uptake measurements The need for a new indicator The Index and segmentation in a nutshell The GMEI measures the level of engagement of smartphone and non-smartphone users across a wide array of use cases and services. The higher the score the more likely consumers are to frequently engage in mobile services. The Index has been built based on inputs from our annual global consumer survey, which was last conducted between June and August 2016 across 56 countries worldwide representing 80% of the global population. It is based on the computation of two scores for each country surveyed: • a usage score, i.e. the average number of mobile use cases adult phone owners engage in • a frequency score, i.e. how often they engage in the use case on average. Scores are calculated separately for smartphone and non-smartphone owners, which are in turn weighted based on the prevalence of these device types in each country (as a percentage of unique subscribers). GSMA Intelligence estimates that in 2016, over 70% of unique subscribers in the developed world are using a smartphone, against around 40% in the developing world where basic/feature phones are still prevalent. A segmentation exercise further supports the Index as it helps to interpret the GMEI ranking and understand the differences in user engagement between countries. Based on the usage patterns of the 56,000 survey respondents, four segments have been identified: the Aficionados, the Pragmatists, the Networkers and the Talkers. The mobile industry needs innovative performance measurements as we enter the fourth industrial revolution. The Global Mobile Engagement Index (GMEI) builds on the legacy of traditional industry indicators (e.g. mobile penetration, connections); some of these are becoming obsolete as we move to a new phase of growth where data tariffs, converged services and multi-device ownership prevail. GSMA Intelligence estimates that two thirds of the global population subscribe to mobile services, and over 60% of them are using the mobile internet. By 2020, mobile subscriber penetration is set to reach close to 90% in the developed world and 70% in the developing world - closing the gap against addressable population ceilings in both regions. As most countries across both developed and developing regions show signs of mobile market saturation, industry indicators reflecting penetration levels are becoming less relevant to measure medium- to long-term growth opportunities. Mobile is transforming people’s lives, and consumer habits will continue to change as mobile devices get smarter, services grow richer and societies become more connected. For instance, 39% on average of smartphone users to date have used their device to look for jobs and access services that help to improve their health or support their education or that of their children. Understanding what makes mobile users unique in anygivencountrytoday,andhowdemandisgoingto evolve tomorrow, is key to anticipating future growth and challenges. This is the key objective behind the development of the Global Mobile Engagement Index.
  4. 4. 4 | GMEI summary and findings Methodology outline Global consumer survey Global Mobile Engagement Index Global mobile consumer segmentation 56 countries surveyed in 2016 1,000 adult respondents per country (18+) Smartphone and non-smartphone owners 29 mobile use cases monitored + weighting x usage score frequency score x unique subscriber %x usage score frequency score weighting = Interpreting the score: The higher the score, the more engaged consumers are in mobile services. A score of zero would mean that consumers never use their mobile phones for any of the 29 mobile use cases covered in the survey. A score of 10 would mean that consumers engage in each of the 29 mobile use cases every day. 56,000 respondents have been clustered into four distinct groups based on how often they engage in the 29 mobile use cases monitored in the survey. Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers Early adopters Early majority Late majority Laggards The segmentation helps to understand some of the differences in the GMEI country ranking.
  5. 5. 5 | GMEI summary and findings Global mobile consumer trends summary Global mobile consumer segmentation % of mobile phone owners (18+) Source: GSMA Intelligence Networkers Aficionados Talkers Pragmatists Mobile user engagement level Mobile operators and the journey towards more affluent mobile consumers Globally, around half of mobile phone owners (47%) todatemainlyusetheirdevicetosimplyplaceavoice call or send a text message. However, the prevalence of this consumer segment - labeled the ‘Talkers’ - is set to decrease over the coming years. A mix of macro-level and market-related factors – some of which operators can control – are driving some of the differences and projections in mobile user engagement noted throughout this study: 1 Demographics 2 Mobile technology innovation 3 Mobile broadband affordability 4 Digital literacy 5 Local content availability We live in a ‘data first’ world and mobile consumers across the globe are are set to engage more frequently in services powered by the mobile internet - particularly in emerging markets where mobile is the only means to access the internet. However, it is not necessarily because a country boasts a high mobile user engagement level that operator data revenues grow faster. Similarly, it takes time to see the latest technology innovations being adopted by the less tech-savvy consumers. Our research highlights that while greater mobile user engagement might contribute to incremental value for mobile providers, this journey takes time and requires a sustainable market environment. A transformation that takes time
  6. 6. 6 | GMEI summary and findings Regional mobile consumer trends summary Towards more affluent mobile consumers, everywhere Mobile consumer behaviour varies by region, and several markets - across developed and developing economies - are expected to witness a shift in their demographic and mobile consumer segmentation distribution in the coming years. The regions that will see a substantial increase in the number of ‘early adopters’ are North America, Europe and South Asia. The US is currently the only market where the most highly-engaged mobile users (the ‘Aficionados’) are predominant. Aficionados will continue to be an exclusive group of very tech-savvy mobile consumers. Across most regions though, the more price-sensitive and less- engaged consumer groups such as the Pragmatists and Networkers tend to form the dominant mobile consumer segments. Most emerging markets are rapidly transitioning to greater mobile internet engagement. By 2020, these countries will encompass over 80% of global unique subscribers and over half of global operator data revenue. SouthAsiaisprojectedtogothroughthemostradical shift in mobile consumer behaviour in the coming years. By 2030, the proportion of consumers who mainly use their phones for voice and text is expected to decrease by 30 percentage points in the region. Along with East Asia/Pacific, South Asia is to witness a shift in its mobile consumer landscape in that its dominant mobile user segment will transition from the ‘Talkers’ in 2016 to the ‘Networkers’ in 2030. This increase in mobile user engagement will be mainly driven by smartphone and 4G adoption, mobile broadband affordability and the regionalisation of online content - particularly in India. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the ‘Networkers’ will be even more dominant in the future, meaning that more mobile consumers will be more frequently using IP-comms, social networking and web browsing in the coming years. To date, price-sensitive demand in the region shows an appetite for mobile internet services despite lower income and lower smartphone adoption. Mobile users in several African markets (e.g. Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique) boast a high engagement in financial services (e.g. mobile money, money transfer). As smartphone adoption is a determinant factor that will drive greater user engagement in the region, it is important to maintain device affordability through appropriate taxation rates. Similarly, in several markets, we noted that poor digital literacy and a lack of local content can hinder mobile user engagement (e.g. Myanmar). The mobile consumer landscape will remain stable in Latin America over the coming years, with highly- engaged users (Pragmatists) dominating regional consumer segmentation. Under this projection, mobile users in the region are expected to continue to frequently consume mobile internet services, including free mobile entertainment content (e.g. free online video streaming) and IP messaging apps. Brazilian mobile users have embraced mobile internet services and tech-savvy demand in the country will continue to lead developments in the region, placing it on par with other mature markets such as China. In both countries, IP comms has already detroned traditional voice and text. In Latin America in particular, the challenge for industry players is to drive more affluent users to go beyond consuming free content on their mobile to fully reap the benefits of the mobile internet. North America Latin America Europe East Asia / Pacific South Asia Middle East & North Africa Sub-Saharan Africa Predominant mobile consumer segment by region Smartphone owners (18+) Source: GSMA Intelligence 2016 2030 Aficionados Pragmatists Pragmatists Talkers Talkers Networkers Networkers Networkers Networkers Aficionados Pragmatists Pragmatists Networkers Networkers
  7. 7. 7 | GMEI summary and findings Global mobile user engagement – top 10 insights Smartphones are more frequently used for online window-shopping, than to generate actual purchases. Globally >70% on average of smartphone consumers use their device to get information about products and services, but only half use it to purchase goods. Consumers in the US and South Korea are leading engagement in mobile shopping, but multi-screen ownership tends to prevent greater usage. Traditional SMS is still used more frequently than IP messages in several mature markets. In France and the US, only 28% and 41% of smartphone users respectively claim to be using IP messaging more than text. This is partly due to the fact that unlimited SMS in bundled tariffs were introduced long before IP messaging apps started to become popular. In France and the US, the vast majority of smartphone users claim to have subscribed to a tariff that offers ‘unlimited text’ (91% and 80% respectively). There are more ‘early adopters’ in São Paulo than in Tokyo. Japan shows a lower mobile user engagement level than most developed countries, due to a lower adoption rate of smartphones and a greater prevalence of the 55+ population, which tend to be less engaged than younger Japanese consumers. Brazil shows a higher prevalence of its base of ’Aficionados’ (the most engaged and tech-savvy consumer group) which is almost twice as high as in Japan (14% vs. 8% respectively). Paying a bill or transferring money to a friend using a mobile phone is more frequent in Nairobi than it is in London, Paris or Zurich. Around 4 in every 5 consumers in Kenya and Tanzania use their mobile phones to send or receive money from friends, relatives or business associates via mobile money services. Mobile money services are more convenient to process cash transactions than online banking services, which are being used by around 57% of smartphone users across the UK, France and Switzerland altogether. Free content is king; everyone bows to mobile video streaming. Ensuring network capacity will remain a key priority for market players as mobile video traffic continues to rise. >70% of smartphone users globally watch free online videos on their phone (e.g. YouTube), and half of smartphone users watch or replay live TV programmes on their phone. The elders of tomorrow will be more connected than the elders of today. By 2030, the ageing population and generational shift in Europe will drive an increase of almost 10pp in the number of highly-engaged smartphone users (labeled ‘Aficionados’ and ‘Pragmatists’). Demographic projections towards 2050 show that as Millennial and Post-Millennial mobile users transition to older age bands, the prevalence of highly-engaged users will gradually increase in each market. Female mobile phone owners in India are 43% less likely to engage in mobile internet services than men. Last year, 17% of female mobile phone owners (18+) in India engaged in mobile internet based services compared to 29% of male phone owners. These low usage levels in the country are influenced by the large prevalence of non-smartphone subscribers (77%). Smartphone ownership is not the end game. There are countries with high smartphone ownership where user engagement is low, due to digital illiteracy and a lack of local content (e.g. in Myanmar). Wearables appeal to all ages and genders, and are not just for mobile addicts. Wearables (smartwatch or fitness tracker) seem to have been adopted by multiple groups of consumers with varying levels of tech-savviness. There are no clear differences in ownership between age groups nor any large inequalities in ownership between men and women. The millennials are not always more engaged mobile users than their elders. Targeting demand from the Baby Boomers is important. In South Korea, over a quarter of smartphone users are Baby Boomers (between 51 and 69 years of age today). This group of consumers use their mobile phones as much as the millennials to browse the web, read the news, download apps, get information about products and services and use navigation apps.
  8. 8. 8 | GMEI summary and findings Global Mobile Engagement Index – ranking # Country Engagement Score 1 Korea, South 5.0 2 Qatar 5.0 3 United States of America 4.7 4 Saudi Arabia 4.6 5 Denmark 4.5 6 Finland 4.5 7 Australia 4.5 8 Spain 4.4 9 Sweden 4.4 10 Romania 4.3 11 Greece 4.2 12 United Kingdom 4.2 13 Israel 4.2 14 Austria 4.2 15 Switzerland 4.2 16 Portugal 4.1 17 Italy 4.0 18 Poland 3.9 19 Germany 3.9 20 France 3.6 21 Canada 3.5 22 Belgium 3.4 23 Netherlands 3.3 24 Russian Federation 3.2 25 Japan 3.0 26 Puerto Rico 2.9 27 Brazil 2.8 28 China 2.6 # Country Engagement Score 29 Argentina 2.5 30 Guatemala 2.4 31 Chile 2.4 32 South Africa 2.3 33 Philippines 2.2 34 Mexico 2.1 35 Ukraine 2.1 36 Vietnam 2.1 37 Algeria 1.9 38 Nicaragua 1.9 39 Morocco 1.7 40 Thailand 1.7 41 Colombia 1.5 42 Kenya 1.5 43 Mozambique 1.5 44 Indonesia 1.4 45 Tanzania 1.4 46 Ivory Coast 1.4 47 Cameroon 1.3 48 Nigeria 1.3 49 Egypt 1.1 50 India 1.1 51 Uzbekistan 1.0 52 Sierra Leone 0.9 53 Myanmar 0.8 54 Pakistan 0.8 55 DRC 0.6 56 Ethiopia 0.5 Thescoreaccountsforsmartphoneandnon-smartphoneusers andisweightedbasedonuniquesubscriberpenetration.
  9. 9. 9 | GMEI summary and findings Five key market factors are powering mobile user engagement 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% There are five key factors driving the next transition to greater mobile user engagement, other than income distribution and literacy rates. GlobalMobileEngagementIndex(GMEI) % of consumers engaging in mobile internet use cases Generational demographic shifts Mobile technology innovation Mobile broadband affordability Digital literacy Local content availability Countries rapidly transitioning to greater mobile data engagement Saudi Arabia QatarKorea UK USA Ethiopia Myanmar Uzbekistan Indonesia Thailand Ukraine Algeria Colombia Ivory Coast Cameroon DRC Pakistan Sierra Leone India Nigeria Kenya Morocco Nicaragua Mozambique Tanzania Argentina Puerto Rico Japan Russia Brazil China Guatemala Netherlands France Italy Germany Poland Portugal Austria Sweden Finland AustraliaDenmark Switzerland Greece Israel Romania Spain CanadaBelgium Mexico Vietnam Chile South Africa Philippines Egypt
  10. 10. 10 | GMEI summary and findings The relationship between mobile engagement and data revenue can be asymmetric Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Canada Chile Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Israel Italy Japan Korea, South Netherlands Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Russia Saudi Arabia Spain Sweden Switzerland UK USA Algeria Brazil Cameroon China Colombia DRC Ivory Coast Egypt Ethiopia Guatemala India Indonesia Kenya Mexico Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistan Philippines Romania Sierra Leone South Africa Tanzania Thailand Ukraine Uzbekistan Vietnam R2 =0.56144 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% GlobalMobileEngagementIndex(GMEI) 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 The share of mobile data revenue varies considerably between markets, despite a reasonably close level of user engagement, partly due to differences in consumer behaviour by country. Mobile user engagement explains the level of data revenue by country in 56% of cases, as other market factors are at play, and as in many countries operators charge a flat fee to access mobile internet services. Japan differs to Korea or the USA due to a lower prevalence of smartphones, and a larger elderly population, who tend to be less engaged in mobile internet services. Data revenue as % of recurring revenue, 2016 GMEI vs. operator data revenue as a % of service revenue, 2016 Source: GSMA Intelligence
  11. 11. 11 | GMEI summary and findings Higher mobile user engagement does not ensure faster data revenue growth GMEI vs. operator data revenue growth 2015–16 Source: GSMA Intelligence 2015–2016 increase in data revenue as % of recurring revenue (in percentage points) -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Korea, SouthQatar USA Saudi Arabia Denmark Finland Australia Spain Sweden Romania Greece UKIsrael Austria SwitzerlandPortugal Italy Poland Germany France Canada Belgium Netherlands Russia Japan Puerto RicoBrazil China Argentina Guatemala Chile South Africa Philippines Mexico UkraineVietnam Algeria Nicaragua MoroccoThailand Colombia Kenya Mozambique IndonesiaTanzania Ivory CoastCameroon Nigeria EgyptIndia Uzbekistan Sierra Leone Myanmar Pakistan DRC Ethiopia 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 Despite the level of user engagement (high or low), data revenue growth remains slow (2pp on average between 2015 and 2016) highlighting the challenge facing mobile operators in generating rapid return on investments. China witnessed a substantial increase in data revenue in 2016 bringing it on par with most Western markets as data represents close to 50% of service revenue, but user engagement remains below the developed world’s average. GlobalMobileEngagementIndex(GMEI) Higher mobile user engagement does not ensure faster data revenue growth, emphasising the need for a sustainable market environment.
  12. 12. 12 | GMEI summary and findings Consumer survey inputs: 29 mobile use cases were covered to build the index “Please tell me how frequently, if at all, you use each of the following communication tools and services on any of your mobile phones”. [Never - Less than once a month - every month - every week - every day] Traditional communication • Phone calls over cellular/mobile network • SMS/MMS Lifestyle • Look for or apply for a job • Access government services • Access services that help me to improve or monitor my health and or the health of my family Digital commerce • Get information about products and services • Pay for on-demand TV/movie • Pay for music online • Order and purchase goods online • Pay for goods using contactless paymentMobile internet communication • Video calls • IP messaging app • Email • Phone calls using a provider other than your mobile operator Apps • Download apps Financial services • Transfer money • Online banking • Financial services (like paying utility bills) • Send or receive money from friends/relatives/business associates via mobile money services Social networking • Visit social networking websites Navigation • Use map applications Internet • Browse the internet • Read the news Entertainment • Play games • Watch free online video • Watch live TV or replay TV programmes • Listen to free online music • Listen to the radio • Reading eBooks
  13. 13. 13 | GMEI summary and findings Consumer segmentation – key characteristics Segment Key characteristics Key services determining membership Aficionados • Highest recorded engagement across all use cases • More male oriented and younger generations prevail • Greater presence in the developed region • Very tech-savvy, good understanding of mobile technology and upcoming products and services • Spend more time exploring the web and social networks than placing voice calls or sending SMS • Very likely to own smart TVs and wearables • Predominantly connected to 4G networks • High engagement in digital commerce and financial services Pragmatists • High usage recorded across most use cases • Similar demographics and characteristics to Aficionados, except that the Pragmatists have a preference for free content and are less likely to use their phones to pay for products and services • They engage in entertainment, digital commerce and financial services, but at a rate almost twice lower than the Aficionados • Almost equal split between 4G and 3G connectivity • Less tech-savvy than the Aficionados Networkers • Moderate usage recorded across fewer use cases than the above groups • Mobile phones are used essentially to explore the internet (web browsing, reading the news) and communicate (via voice, SMS, IP comms, social networks) • More female oriented with similar age demographics to the Pragmatists (i.e. younger generations) • Less tech-savvy, good understanding of mobile tech but no specific knowledge of upcoming products and services • Unlikely to own wearables but reasonably good ownership of smart TVs • Predominantly connected to 3G rather than 4G • Greater presence in the developing world • Almost never use their mobile phones for digital commerce and financial services • Occasionally download apps and consume free media content Talkers • Low usage recorded across all use cases with the exception of traditional comms • Mobile phones are used essentially to place a voice call or send an SMS • Older generations prevail, with an equal split between men and women • Still experimenting with mobile internet communications and internet use (web browsing, online news) • Never use their phones for digital commerce and financial services, nor to consume free media content • Almost never download apps and no interest in social networking • Predominantly connected to 3G, while 2G connectivity is greater than 4G • Greater presence in the developing world
  14. 14. 14 | GMEI summary and findings The average consumer profile varies by region Profiling smartphone users Profiling non-smartphone users Average Age Consumer segment1 Tech- savviness2 Most often connected to3 Using at least every month Average Age Consumer segment1 Tech- savviness2 Most often connected to3 Using at least every month North America 35–44 Pragmatists Medium 4G 45–54 Talkers Medium 2G 35–44 Aficionados High 4G 55–64 Talkers High 2G Latin America 35–44 Pragmatists Medium 3G 45–54 Talkers Medium 2G 35–44 Pragmatists Medium 3G 45–54 Talkers Medium 2G Europe 35–44 Pragmatists High 3G 55–64 Talkers Medium 2G 45–54 Pragmatists High 3G 55–64 Talkers High 2G East Asia / Pacific 35–44 Talkers Medium 3G 45–54 Talkers Medium 2G 35–44 Pragmatists Medium 3G 45–54 Talkers Medium 2G South Asia 25–34 Talkers Medium 3G 35–44 Talkers Medium 2G 25–34 Networkers Medium 3G 35–44 Talkers Medium 2G Middle East North Africa 25–34 Pragmatists Medium 3G 35–44 Talkers Medium 2G 35–44 Pragmatists High 3G 35–44 Talkers High 2G Sub- Saharan Africa 25–34 Networkers Medium 3G 35–44 Talkers Medium 2G 25–34 Networkers Medium 3G 35–44 Talkers Medium 2G 1 Aficionados = early adopters Pragmatists = early majority Networkers = late majority Talkers = laggards 2 High = I have a good understanding of mobile phones as well as upcoming mobile products and technologies Medium = I have a good understanding of mobile phones but no particular knowledge about upcoming mobile products and technologies Low = I am not comfortable with mobile phone technology, it is too complex and changes too fast 3 Perception based question: Which mobile network is your primary mobile most often connected to?
  15. 15. 15 | GMEI summary and findings How is consumer behaviour going to change by region? Projected change in segmentation, % of adult smartphone subscribers Services contributing the most to the change in user engagement Key countries to experience the most radical change Key drivers of user engagement change North America • Canada • Demographic shifts • Platformisation • Network innovation (e.g. 5G, IoT) 2030 51% 27% 15% 8% 2016 45% 27% 14% 14% Latin America • Chile • Colombia • Mexico • 4G adoption • Smartphone adoption • Platformisation 2030 11% 45% 34% 9% 2016 11% 43% 32% 14% Europe • Belgium • France • Germany • Netherlands • Nordics • Poland • UK • Demographic shifts • 4G adoption • Platformisation • Network innovation 2030 25% 42% 20% 14% 2016 21% 38% 19% 22% East Asia / Pacific • Indonesia • Japan • Myanmar • Demographic shifts • 4G adoption • Smartphone adoption • Platformisation • MBB affordability • Digital literacy • Local content • Network innovation 2030 11% 33% 37% 19% 2016 10% 29% 30% 31% South Asia • India • 4G adoption • Smartphone adoption • MBB affordability • Local content regionalisation 2030 20% 27% 39% 15% 2016 13% 17% 25% 45% Middle East North Africa • Egypt • Morocco • Uzbekistan • 4G adoption • Smartphone adoption • MBB affordability 2030 11% 35% 40% 14% 2016 10% 31% 32% 27% Sub-Saharan Africa • Ivory Coast • Kenya • Mozambique • Tanzania • 4G adoption • Smartphone adoption • MBB affordability • Digital literacy 2030 11% 24% 55% 10% 2016 10% 22% 41% 27% A ficionados Early adopters Pragm atists Early m ajority N etw orkers Late m ajority Talkers Laggards
  16. 16. 16 | GMEI summary and findings Tomorrow’s consumer will be more connected and more engaged in internet-based services Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers Early adopters Early majority Late majority Laggards Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers Early adopters Early majority Late majority Laggards 2016 towards 2030 %ofsmartphonesubscribers bysegment 20% 30% smartwatches maps web browsing social networks IP comms traditional comms autonomous car microwearables multi-person video call AR drone delivery fitness trackers financial services mobile commerce apps media content lifestyle connected home VR 3D printing robotics Mobile user engagement
  17. 17. 17 | GMEI summary and findings GMEI methodology outline GSMA Intelligence has set up an annual consumer survey to better measure mobile uptake across both developed and developing economies. The survey fieldwork took place between June and August 2016 across 56 countries worldwide, representing 80% of the global population. The sample size included 1,000 respondents per country. Of the 56 countries, the 32 developing countries were surveyed face- to-face while the 24 developed countries were surveyed online. Sampling frame: The research is based on proportional quota sampling. The research participants are selected non-randomly according to a fixed quota that represents the major characteristics of a population (gender, age, urban/rural location) by sampling a proportional amount of each. The sampling frame uses base data from the United Nations (UN) and the World Bank. The variables used to construct the sampling frame are: • Age (18–64, five-year age bands) • Gender • Household income • Urban vs. rural household location Household income quotas are monitored in order to get a spread across all variants of the income structure. In developing countries, a specific set of questions was added within the survey for each market to measure the social grade of each household, helping to better assess income, employment and occupation. Sampling points: Thevariablesusedtoconstructthesamplingframe,andawillingness to take part, are the criteria used to classify a participant as the ‘right person’. For the face-to-face survey, the sampling points are set based on local knowledge. If information about gender or age distribution throughout the country is available (e.g. from a census) then generally this will be used to define the sampling points where interviewers should intervene. An enumerator goes to each of the sampling areas and carries out the survey based on the predefined random-walk instructions. In each quota cell, there is a target set on the number of successful interviews. Survey administration: Thedeliveryofthestructuredsurveyisviaintervieweradministered computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI) and interviewer administered paper survey (PAPI) in developing countries, and self-completion online in developed countries. About the survey
  18. 18. 18 | GMEI summary and findings GMEI methodology outline The Global Mobile Engagement Index measures the average level of user engagement with mobile phones by country. So the higher the final score, the more likely consumers are to frequently use their mobile phones. In this study, the terms ‘consumers’ and ‘users’ refer to adult (18+) mobile phone owners. Unless stated otherwise, the statistics presented throughout the report refer to 2016. ‘Mobile internet’ or ‘data’ use mentioned throughout the study is calculated based on engagement in the 27 survey use cases that are internet-enabled. The GMEI is based on the computation of two scores for each country: the average number of use cases people engage in, and the average frequency at which they do them. The results of our 2016 consumer survey form the inputs used to build the indicator. Respondents were asked how frequently they engage with their mobile phone in 29 use cases ranging from traditional phone calls and SMS to more advanced services such as video streaming or online shopping. The answers to these questions are turned into a numerical frequency score, such that never = 1, less than once a month = 2, every month = 3, every week = 4, and everyday = 5. Frequency score vs. usage score: For each respondent, we therefore calculate a frequency score and a usage score. The averaged frequency of engagement in the 29 use cases, a continuous number on a scale from 1 to 5, results in the average usage frequency score. The average number of use case score is calculated as the proportion of all 29 use cases a respondent engages in, converted into a scale from 1 to 5. The sum of the two scores results in the mobile engagement score of an individual respondent, which is then converted into a 0 to 10 scale. The frequency and usage scores for any given is calculated separately for smartphone users and non-smartphone users. These two distinct scores are then weighted based on smartphone and non-smartphone ownership rates (as a percentage of unique subscribers). The final score is then multiplied by the unique subscriber penetration rate to normalise the index based on the share of the population that is ‘connected’. The overall equation is as follows: GMEI = [Smartphone users % × (smartphone usage score + frequency score) + non-smartphone users % × (non- smartphone usage score + frequency score)] × unique subcriber % About the Index The segmentation of respondents into distinct consumer groups was performed by using the method of k-means cluster analysis. This analysis was performed on the results of the 56,000 survey respondents.Thismathematicalmethodassignedeachrespondent according to their mobile engagement pattern into one of four clusters: the Aficionados, the Pragmatists, the Networkers and the Talkers. About the consumer segmentation
  19. 19. Summary 1 GMEI summary and findings Understanding regional consumer behaviour 2 Moving to smarter devices Mobile technology innovation is driving user engagement, but in some countries it is not the end game. 3 Living in a ‘data first’ world IP-comms continue to change the way we communicate, but mobile data services consumption varies by region. 4 Early adopters on the rise The next generational demographic shifts will change the profile of tomorrow’s mobile consumers. 5 Consumer segmentation, regional trends i Mobile data use cases that today drive the transition from one consumer segment to the next ii Smartphone user engagement is 2.5× greater than non-smartphone iii But smartphone ownership is not the end game iv Myanmar vs. Thailand v Digital illiteracy and lack of local content can prevent greater mobile user engagement vi Greater local content relevancy and digital literacy can boost mobile user engagement vii 4G connectivity drives greater mobile user engagement viii But 4G adoption takes time and is not yet mainstream in most countries ix Mobile broadband tariffs and contract prevalence are drivers of mobile data engagement x Tech-savviness is not just prevalent among early adopters or younger generations xi There are non-smartphone users with high engagement in data-centric use cases Data insights Appendix
  20. 20. Talkers Pragmatists NetworkersAficionados Traditional communication Mobile internet communication Internet Navigation Apps EntertainmentLifestyle Digital commerce Financial services 20 | Moving to smarter devices Mobile data use cases that today drive the transition from one consumer segment to the next
  21. 21. 21 | Moving to smarter devices Smartphone user engagement is 2.5x greater than non-smartphone Smartphone user engagement globally is 2.5× greater than non-smartphone engagement. Given the expected ~2 billion smartphone connections to be added globally over the next five years, rapidly taking smartphone adoption to saturation – with growth primarily coming from developing economies – mobile user engagement is going to increase dramatically over the coming years. Smartphone users engage 4× more in data-centric use cases than non-smartphone users, and at a frequency rate 2.5× greater than the latter group. The smartphone consumer base is home to the greatest shares of highly engaged users (Aficionados, Pragmatists). On average across the developed countries surveyed, almost 4 in every 5 unique subscribers own a smartphone. Among this group, smartphone user engagement is 2× greater than non- smartphone engagement. On average across the developing countries surveyed, around 3 in every 7 unique subscribers own a smartphone. Among this group, smartphone user engagement is almost 3× greater than non-smartphone engagement. Never Less than once a month Every month Every week TalkersNetworkersPragmatistsAficionados 17% 6% 35% 7% 26% 10% 22% 77%
  22. 22. 22 | Moving to smarter devices But smartphone ownership is not the end game 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% GMEI–Smartphoneusers Smartphone adoption as a % of unique subscribers (adults) Score:0–10 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.5 7.0 Algeria Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Brazil Cameroon Canada Chile China Colombia DRC Denmark Egypt Ethiopia Finland France Germany Greece Guatemala Netherlands India Indonesia IsraelItaly Ivory Coast Japan Kenya Korea Mexico Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistan Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Saudi Arabia Sierra Leone South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland Tanzania Thailand UK Ukraine USA Uzbekistan Vietnam In both Myanmar and Thailand, consumers have rapidly adopted affordable smartphones unlike in other countries where the migration from basic/feature phones onto smartphones took some time. Yet, despite a high level of smartphone ownership in both countries today, mobile user engagement is relatively low – highlighting that smartphone ownership alone is not sufficient to ensure a substantial level of engagement in certain countries.
  23. 23. 23 | Moving to smarter devices Myanmar vs. Thailand 6% 61% 33% 5% 74% 22% 4% 60% 33% 38% 50% 12% Thailand Engagement in mobile internet use cases Myanmar Millennials Thailand 35+ Millennials Myanmar 35+ Millennials 35+ 23% 27%13% 44% I am not comfortable with mobile phone technology, it is too complex and changes too fast I have a good understanding of mobile phones but no particular knowledge about upcoming mobile products and technologies I have a good understanding of mobile phones as well as upcoming mobile products and technologies Traditional communications Mobile internet communications Social networking Internet Lifestyle Apps Navigation Entertainment Digital commerce Financial services 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Myanmar Thailand Developing region In both Myanmar and Thailand, only 1% of the smartphone consumer base is classified as Aficionados (early adopters). Around 90% of consumers belong to the less engaged segments (Networkers, Talkers). Consumers engage in social networking, IP-comms and web browsing, albeit to lesser extents than in other developing countries. The millennials represent the more engaged and more tech-savvy consumer group. Yet, in Myanmar, the vast majority of consumers claim not to be comfortable with mobile phone technology, including millennials. Usage frequency score by use cases, smartphone users Source: GSMA Intelligence Tech-savviness prevalence by age group Source: GSMA Intelligence
  24. 24. 24 | Moving to smarter devices Digital illiteracy and lack of local content can prevent greater mobile user engagement Multi-screen use I already have access to the internet via a computer or laptop I have/would have trouble understanding how mobile internet applications, websites or email work on a mobile phone I have trouble understanding the language that the mobile handset is in I have trouble understanding how to use a mobile handset I am not able to access enough content and information about my local area and/or country I am not able to access enough content and information written in my own language Digital literacy Local content availability Myanmar Thailand Developing region 41% 32% 21% 17% 61% 22% 12% 53% 15% 12% 56% 15% 17% 43% 12% 16% 50% 3% Percentage of smartphone consumers who agree that the reasons below are preventing them from using the internet on a mobile phone more often or for more varied uses than they are today. Source: GSMA Intelligence In the developing world, mobile is the de facto device for connecting to the internet. But for many smartphone consumers, particularly in Myanmar, digital literacy and a lack of locally relevant content are factors that explain low levels of mobile user engagement. Local content availability is set to improve in a country like Myanmar as more local start-ups are developing locally relevant services to deliver tailored content to consumers. Improving digital literacy is, however, a longer term challenge which should start by targeting the millennials, who today represent 43% of the population in Myanmar, and 31% in Thailand.
  25. 25. 25 | Moving to smarter devices Greater local content relevancy and digital literacy can boost mobile user engagement Number of generic top-level domain per capita Number of country code top-level domain per capita Never Less than once a month Every month Every week Every day Developing countries Developed countries 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Frequency score – Internet use cases (web browsing, reading the news) (smartphone and non-smartphone) 21% 23% 13% 20% 22% 22% 22% 16% 13% 16% South AsiaLatamEast Asia/ Pacific Northern Africa SSA Digital literacy Local content availability Engagement in mobile internet services (web browsing, reading the news) vs. local content relevance (gTLDs and ccTLDs). Source: GSMA Intelligence, TLDLogic, ZookNIC Percentage of smartphone consumers who agree that the reasons below are preventing them from using the internet on a mobile phone more often or for more varied uses than they are today. Source: GSMA Intelligence, TLDLogic, ZookNIC
  26. 26. 26 | Moving to smarter devices 4G connectivity drives greater mobile user engagement 2G networks (GSM, GRPS, EDGE, E) 3G networks (WCDMA, HSPA, H, H+) 4G networks (4G, LTE)2G 3G 4G 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Play games Watch free online video Watch live TV or replay TV programmes Reading eBooks Listen to the radio Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers 14% 37% 49% 10% 49% 41% 15% 59% 26% 29% 48% 22% Global smartphone consumer segmentation split by network connectivity Source: GSMA Intelligence Percentage of adult consumers who engage in mobile entertainment services by network connectivity Source: GSMA Intelligence
  27. 27. 27 | Moving to smarter devices But 4G adoption takes time and is not yet mainstream in most countries%ofconsumerswhoclaimedthattheirprimary mobilephoneismostoftenconnectedto4Gnetworks 4G coverage as % of population In these countries, more than two thirds of the population is covered by 4G networks, but less than one third of consumers claimed in our survey that their primary mobile phone is most often connected to 4G networks. In this group of countries, 16% of mobile connections are running on 4G, and the Aficionados represent 13% of consumers on average. In these countries, on average less than a quarter of the population is covered by 4G networks (excluding Nicaragua and Guatemala), and 5% on average of consumers claim to be primarily connected to 4G. In this group of countries, 1% of mobile connections are running on 4G , and the Aficionados represent 5% of consumers on average. Most of these markets have reached nationwide 4G coverage, and over half of consumers claim to be primarily connected to 4G networks. In this group of countries, half of mobile connections are running on 4G to date, and the Aficionados represent 22% of consumers on average. 4Gmigration 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Ukraine Ethiopia KenyaEgypt Mozambique Tanzania India Nigeria Pakistan Algeria DRC Cameroon Indonesia Myanmar Ivory CoastSierra Leone Nicaragua Guatemala Philippines Uzbekistan South Africa Thailand Greece MexicoRussia Germany IsraelColombia Portugal Romania Austria Brazil Morocco Argentina Chile France Poland BelgiumItaly UK Netherlands Spain Finland Canada DenmarkQatar Australia Switzerland Sweden Japan Saudi Arabia USA China Korea, South
  28. 28. 28 | Moving to smarter devices Mobile broadband tariffs and contract prevalence are drivers of mobile data engagement Mobile data services usage The higher the share of contract connections in a country, the higher the engagement in mobile data use cases. Contract 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Mobile data services usage The lower the MBB contract prices (as a share of income) in a country, the higher the engagement in mobile data use cases. MBBcontractpriceasashareofGNIpercapita 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Mobile data usage vs. contract connections as a percentage of total connections Source: GSMA Intelligence Mobile data usage vs. mobile broadband (MBB) contract prices as a percentage of GNI per capita Source: GSMA Intelligence, ITU
  29. 29. 29 | Moving to smarter devices Tech-savviness is not just prevalent among early adopters or younger generations 47%44%9% 32%49%19% I am not comfortable with mobile phone technology, it is too complex and changes too fast I have a good understanding of mobile phones but no particular knowledge about upcoming mobile products and technologies I have a good understanding of mobile phones as well as upcoming mobile products and technologies Millennials Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers 35+ 3% 29% 69% 7% 49% 44% 15% 56% 29% 34% 47% 19% Tech-savviness prevalence by consumer segment (smartphone users) Source: GSMA Intelligence Tech-savviness prevalence by age group (smartphone users) Source: GSMA Intelligence
  30. 30. 30 | Moving to smarter devices There are non-smartphone users with high engagement in data-centric use cases 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Traditional communications Mobile internet communications Social networking Internet Lifestyle Apps Navigation Entertainment Digital commerce Financial services Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers 35+ Millennials 37% 43% 20% 20% 20% 8% I am not comfortable with mobile phone technology, it is too complex and changes too fast I have a good understanding of mobile phones but no particular knowledge about upcoming mobile products and technologies I have a good understanding of mobile phones as well as upcoming mobile products and technologies 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Indonesia C hina C hile India R ussia A rgentina W orld M ozam bique A lgeria G uatem ala N icaragua Philippines B razil Usage frequency score among non-smartphone users Source: GSMA Intelligence Tech-savviness prevalence by age group Source: GSMA Intelligence % of Aficionados and Pragmatists among non-smartphone users Source: GSMA Intelligence There are key developing countries where non-smartphone users are showing high engagement levels, namely Algeria, Brazil, Guatemala, Mozambique and Philippines. These countries have very young populations, which is a driver for high user engagement. Additionally, tech-savviness among non-smartphone users in countries like Philippines, Mozambique and Romania is well above the developed world average – this is a driver for engagement in mobile data services. These highly engaged tech-savvy users are expected to rapidly transition to smartphones.
  31. 31. Summary 1 GMEI summary and findings Understanding regional consumer behaviour 2 Moving to smarter devices Mobile technology innovation is driving user engagement, but in some countries it is not the end game. 3 Living in a ‘data first’ world IP comms continues to change the way we communicate, but mobile data services consumption varies by region. 4 Early adopters on the rise The next generational demographic shifts will change the profile of tomorrow’s mobile consumers. 5 Consumer segmentation, regional trends i Mobile IP comms continues to change the way we communicate ii But there are countries where traditional voice and text is not surpassed by IP comms iii China vs. India iv France vs. UK v Bridging the age gap in social media and IP- comms mobile engagement vi Driving user engagement in financial services: the role of mobile money and the Aficionados vii Tanzania, Kenya and Mozambique show high engagement in mobile money services viii Free online entertainment content is key to drive greater mobile user engagement ix Bridging the mobile entertainment age gap: the millennials are driving usage x Mobile user engagement in digital commerce is influenced by multi-screen ownership xi North America, Middle East and Western Europe lead on ‘lifestyle’ services user engagement Data insights Appendix
  32. 32. 32 | Living in a ‘data first’ world Mobile IP comms continues to change the way we communicate Phone calls SMS/MSS VoIP Video callsIP messages Email Social networks Phone callsPhone callsPhone calls SMS/MSSSMS/MSSSMS/MSS VoIPVoIPVoIP Video callsVideo callsVideo callsIP messagesIP messagesIP messages EmailEmailEmail Social networksSocial networksSocial networks 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 IP-communications Traditional voice an d text Japan Korea, South Vietnam ThailandSaudi Arabia Israel Qatar GreeceSpain Italy Switzerland Germany Ukraine Romania Austria Finland Mexico Guatemala Nicaragua Brazil Argentina Chile Puerto Rico Netherlands South Africa China Countries where the use of email, IP messages and social networking are all more frequent than voice & text Countries where only the use of IP messages is more frequent than voice & text Score:1(never)---5(everyday) Countries in this group have the following characteristics when compared to the other group: Greater prevalence of highly engaged users (Aficionados and Pragmatists) 66% vs. 53% Greater prevalence of highly tech-savvy consumers 43% vs. 35% Greater prevalence of 4G connectivity among users 44% vs. 33% Greater prevalence of contract as a % of connections 62% vs. 31% Lower MBB prices as % of GNI per capita 0.6% vs. 2.4% Smartphone user engagement in traditional voice & text vs. IP comms (frequency score) Source: GSMA Intelligence
  33. 33. 33 | Living in a ‘data first’ world But there are countries where traditional voice and text is not surpassed by IP comms Phone calls SMS/MSS VoIP Video callsIP messages Email Social networks Phone callsPhone callsPhone calls SMS/MSSSMS/MSSSMS/MSS VoIPVoIPVoIP Video callsVideo callsVideo callsIP messagesIP messagesIP messages EmailEmailEmail Social networksSocial networksSocial networks 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 IP-communications Traditional voice an d text Belgium Russia PolandPoland France Portugal UK DenmarkDenmark SwedenSweden Australia Canada USA Countries where the use of email, IP messages and social networking is less frequent than voice & text Score:1(never)---5(everyday) This group of countries benefit from a high adoption of contract connections (64%), high tech-savviness (42%), and a high prevalence (43%) of highly-engaged users (Aficionados and Pragmatists). However, in the countries shown above, an average of 60% of smartphone users benefit from ‘unlimited text’ as part of their tariff, against 37% for consumers in the other groups of countries where IP comms usage is more predominant. The fact that unlimited SMS in bundled tariffs was introduced long before IP messaging apps started to become popular largely influenced the use of WhatsApp and other IP messaging apps in these countries. Smartphone user engagement in traditional voice & text vs. IP comms (frequency score) Source: GSMA Intelligence
  34. 34. 34 | Living in a ‘data first’ world China vs. India Percentage of mobile consumer by age Percentage of perceived network connectivity Percentage of perceived tech-savviness Percentage of consumer segments India China India Millennials 35+ 2G 4G3G Talkers AficionadosNetworkers Pragmatists China India China India China Traditional communications Mobile internet communications Social networking Internet Lifestyle Apps Navigation Entertainment Digital commerce Financial services 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 China India 73% 28% 42% 58% 37% 56% 8% 4% 19% 78% 16% 42% 42% 30% 55% 15% 78% 7% 5%9% 48% 10% 8%34% Not comfortable Average Good India has a very young population, with the millennials representing the vast majority of mobile consumers, who in turn claim to be more tech-savvy than consumers in China. Nevertheless, India ranks in 50th position on the Global Mobile Engagement Index, compared to China in 28th position. The rapid migration away from non-smartphone in India is expected to significantly contribute to the country’s increase in mobile user engagement over the next five years. Despite having a much higher adoption of smartphones (66% vs. 23%) and a greater reach of 4G connectivity than in India, the vast majority of consumers in China belong to the less engaged consumer segments (Networkers, Talkers). In China, consumer engagement on IP comms is high driven by the widespread adoption and popularity of Tencent’s WeChat which includes IP-based messaging and voice features. Mobile user engagement – frequency score Source: GSMA Intelligence
  35. 35. 35 | Living in a ‘data first’ world France vs. UK Percentage of perceived network connectivity Percentage of perceived tech-savviness Percentage of consumer segments UK 2G 4G3G Talkers AficionadosNetworkers Pragmatists France UK France UK France Traditional communications Mobile internet communications Social networking Internet Lifestyle Apps Navigation Entertainment Digital commerce Financial services 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 France UK 14% 43% 43% 9% 51% 40% 11% 40% 49% 18% 47% 35% 32% 28%18% 22% 24% 16% 30%30% Percentage of smartphone users who engage in social networking UK 35+ Millennials France 69% 87%68% 93% Percentage of smartphone users who engage in mobile internet use cases UK 35+ Millennials France 58% 70%50% 82% Not comfortable Average Good France is the only developed market where the less engaged user group (Talkers) is predominant among smartphone users. 4 in every 5 smartphone users in both countries have access to a PC or laptop to connect to the internet, which was quoted as a reason that is preventing them from using the internet on a mobile phone more often or for more varied uses. In both countries, tech-savvy millennials are driving mobile engagement on data- centric use cases. Projected generational demographic shifts coupled with projected smartphone adoption increases show that the prevalence of the most highly engaged user groups (Aficionados and Pragmatists) will make up the vast majority of the user base in France by 2050 (>70%), following the lead of the UK. In both countries, the use of IP comms is not surpassing that of traditional voice and text, mainly due to a high share of contract (88% in France, 64% in the UK) and a large prevalence of ‘unlimited text’ in contract tariffs (91% vs. 60% respectively). Mobile user engagement – frequency score Source: GSMA Intelligence
  36. 36. 36 | Living in a ‘data first’ world 35+ Millennials 35+ Millennials Central/Eastern Europe Latin America Northern America East Asia/Pacific Northern Africa Western Europe SSA 13 South Asia Middle East 25 Delta (PP) 23 22 21 18 17 7 4 0.1 0.3 Delta 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0 82%57% 31% 29% 22% 66% 76% 90% 49% 42% 72% 28% 84% 54% 76% 68% 44% 65% 4.5 4.4 4.1 4.6 4.8 4.6 4.34.5 3.84.0 4.44.6 4.4 4.7 4.64.2 4.64.6 Score: 1 (never) --- 5 (every day) Bridging the age gap in social media and IP comms mobile engagement Percentage of smartphone consumers who use social networking Source: GSMA Intelligence Average frequency engagement score, IP comms Source: GSMA Intelligence Latin American countries show high levels of engagement in social networking and IP comms. In Brazil, smartphone users engage more frequently in IP comms and social networking than traditional voice and text. Overall, the region shows that over half of smartphone users are engaging in mobile data use cases, with a relatively low difference in engagement between the millennials and the 35+ user base (only 9pp in Latam vs. 17pp in Western Europe). A substantial age gap in social networking use exists across both developed and developing countries. In Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, the age gap is smaller than in other regions (except in the Middle East). In these regions, the smartphone user base above 35 years of age is engaging as much as the millennials in mobile data use cases such as social networks and IP comms. The 35+ consumer bases in both regions are key targets for mobile data services, while the millennials will continue to drive engagement in other regions.
  37. 37. 37 | Living in a ‘data first’ world Driving user engagement in financial services: the role of mobile money and the Aficionados 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 $0 GNI per capita (PPP) Financialservicesfrequencyscore Algeria Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Brazil Cameroon Canada Chile China Colombia DRC Denmark Egypt Ethiopia Finland France Germany Greece Guatemala Netherlands India Indonesia Israel Italy Ivory Coast Japan Kenya Korea, South Mexico Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistan Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Saudi Arabia Sierra Leone South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland Tanzania Thailand UK Ukraine USA Uzbekistan Vietnam $10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000 $60,000 $70,000 Score:1(never)---5(everyday) There are African countries with high engagement in financial services, primarily driven by the use of mobile money services. The Aficionados is the consumer segment that engages the most in financial services and digital commerce use cases. Key characteristics: Aficionados 30% Pragmatists 34% Networkers 16% Talkers 19% Millennials data usage 79% 35+ data usage 63% Key characteristics: Aficionados 18% Pragmatists 39% Networkers 17% Talkers 26% Millennials data usage 73% 35+ data usage 55% Average engagement frequency score for financial services vs. GNI per capita (PPP) Source: GSMA Intelligence, World Bank
  38. 38. 38 | Living in a ‘data first’ world Tanzania, Kenya and Mozambique show high engagement in mobile money services Distribution of consumer segments Talkers AficionadosNetworkers Pragmatists Tanzania Mozambique Kenya 68% 59% 69% 17% 22% 21% 6% 11% 6% 9% 8% 5% 35+ group Tanzania Mozambique Kenya 4% 10% 11% 46% 51% 48% 40% 39% 41% Millennials group Tanzania Mozambique Kenya 2% 6% 6% 36% 41% 44% 61% 53% 50% – +Tech-savviness I am not comfortable with mobile phone technology, it is too complex and changes too fast I have a good understanding of mobile phones but no particular knowledge about upcoming mobile products and technologies I have a good understanding of mobile phones as well as upcoming mobile products and technologies Transfer money Online banking Send or receive money from friends/relatives/business associates via mobile money services Financial services (like paying utility bills) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Tanzania Mozambique Kenya The widespread adoption of mobile money services in these countries is a key driver of mobile user engagement. Tanzania shows high levels of consumer tech-savviness. It is often described as a more competitive mobile money market than Kenya, but both countries have similar levels of user engagement in mobile money services. Tanzania differs in usage of mobile money transfers, online banking services and financial services like paying utility bills. Percentage of consumers using financial services Source: GSMA Intelligence
  39. 39. 39 | Living in a ‘data first’ world 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% TalkersNetworkersPragmatistsAficionados 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% TalkersNetworkersPragmatistsAficionados Less than once a monthNever Every month Every week Every day Free online entertainment content is key to drive greater mobile user engagement Average percentage of smartphone users who pay for on-demand TV/movies and online music Source: GSMA Intelligence Average share of smartphone users who consume free online content: stream free videos/music, watch/replay live TV, listen to the radio Source: GSMA Intelligence 60% of smartphone users consume free online content, with a wider spread across all consumer segments. The most popular activity is streaming free online videos (74% of smartphone users), followed by streaming free music and radio (~60% on average), while one smartphone user in two on average watches/replays live TV programmes. 30% of smartphone users pay for online content, with an equal usage of streaming on-demand TV/movies and online music. The vast majority of them belong to the most engaged consumer group, the Aficionados (early adopters).
  40. 40. 40 | Living in a ‘data first’ world 35+ Millennials 35+ Millennials Play games Listen to free online music Watch free online videos Reading eBooks Watch live TV or replay TV programmes Listen to the radio 19 Delta (PP) 15 14 10 9 6 0.7 Delta 0.6 0.7 0.3 0.3 0.2 75% 64% 81% 55% 63% 46% 56% 49% 67% 46% 56% 36% 3.2 3.5 2.9 2.5 2.2 2.8 1.8 2.1 2.5 2.1 2.4 2.7 Score: 1 (never) --- 5 (every day) Bridging the mobile entertainment age gap: the millennials are driving usage Percentage of smartphone users who engage in entertainment use cases Source: GSMA Intelligence Entertainment use cases – average usage frequency score Source: GSMA Intelligence Online music and video streaming are the two use cases that smartphone users engage in most frequently in Europe, Latin America, North America and North Africa. In East Asia/Pacific and the Middle East, consumers engage more frequently in mobile gaming and video streaming. In South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, mobile gaming and listening to the radio are the two use cases that smartphone users engage in most frequently. Mobile gaming and online music/video streaming are the most popular entertainment use cases among smartphone users, with the millennials the primary consumer target for these services.
  41. 41. 41 | Living in a ‘data first’ world Mobile user engagement in digital commerce is influenced by multi-screen ownership Never Once a month or more Order and purchase goods online Get information about products and services (e.g. pricing, availability) 28% 72% 52% 48% 69% 63% 62% 61% 47% 41% 32% 23% 18% PragmatistsAficionadosPragmatistsAficionados 90% 10% 94% 63% 37% 6% 99% Northern Africa SSA Latam South Asia East Asia/Pacific Middle East Central/Eastern Europe Western Europe North America 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Never Less than once a month Every month Every week Every day Averagefrequencyscore Percentage of smartphone users engaged in digital commerce use cases Source: GSMA Intelligence Percentage of smartphone users who order and purchase goods online using their mobile phone Source: GSMA Intelligence Using smartphones to look for information about products and services is a common use case among smartphone users (52%) but the conversion rate to purchasing goods online via mobile is much lower (29%) and is typically an Aficionados affair. These two digital commerce use cases are the only use cases where the millennials do not have greater engagement than their elders (35+). More than half of smartphone users in these regions use their phones for online shopping, almost every month. The use of multiple screens to access mobile internet services is a key reason behind this low conversion rate and low engagement. Close to 4 in every 5 smartphone users in the developed world claim that one reason that prevents them from using mobile internet services more often or for more varied uses is the fact that they already have access to the internet via a computer or laptop. This correlates with IBM’s finding that nearly 60%  of all e-commerce traffic in the US is coming from mobile devices, but that smartphones and tablets only account for 44% of actual sales. Desktop sales continue to bring in higher-value sales compared to mobile.
  42. 42. 42 | Living in a ‘data first’ world 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 South Asia SSA Northern Africa Western Europe East Asia/ Pacific Central/ Eastern Europe North America Middle East Latam Access government services Access services that help me to improve or monitor my health or the health of my family Look for or apply for a job Access government services Access health services Look for or apply for a job Look for or apply for a jobAccess government servicesAccess health services Never Once a month or more 36% 64% 35% 65% 31% 69% TalkersNetworkersPragmatistsAficionados 93% 91% 84% 68% 67% 56% 12% 12% 9% 38% 32% 32% North America, Middle East and Western Europe lead on ‘lifestyle’ services user engagement Average engagement frequency score – lifestyle use cases Source: GSMA Intelligence Average usage of lifestyle services, by consumer segment Source: GSMA Intelligence Average usage of lifestyle services Source: GSMA Intelligence Consumers in India and Pakistan are likely to use their mobile phones to access e-government services and look for/apply for jobs more than consumers in China or Indonesia. Highly-engaged consumer groups (Aficionados and Pragmatists) are more likely to use lifestyle services on their mobile phones. Similarly, the millennials have a greater engagement in these use cases (49%) than the 35+ group (39%).
  43. 43. 1 GMEI summary and findings Understanding regional consumer behaviour 2 Moving to smarter devices Mobile technology innovation is driving user engagement, but in some countries it is not the end game. 3 Living in a ‘data first’ world IP-comms continue to change the way we communicate, but mobile data services consumption varies by region. 4 Early adopters on the rise The next generational demographic shifts will change the profile of tomorrow’s mobile consumers. 5 Consumer segmentation, regional trends i The profile of consumers is set to change, driven by greater mobile data engagement ii The presence of early adopters is projected to rise globally amongst smartphone users iii ‘Mobile-first’ is a given for the millennials who show higher mobile data engagement than 35+ iv US: the millennials are largely influencing future mobile user engagement patterns v EU: the population is ageing, but the elders of tomorrow will be more connected than today vi Population is not ageing everywhere, demographic shifts differ in emerging markets vii Japan vs. US Data insights Appendix Summary
  44. 44. 44 | Early adopters on the rise The profile of consumers is set to change, driven by greater mobile data engagement 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% GlobalMobileEngagementIndex(GMEI) Score:0–10 Saudi Arabia QatarKorea UK USA Ethiopia Myanmar Uzbekistan Indonesia Thailand Ukraine Algeria Colombia Ivory Coast Cameroon DRC Pakistan Sierra Leone India Nigeria Kenya Morocco Nicaragua Mozambique Tanzania Argentina Puerto Rico Japan Russia Brazil China Guatemala Netherlands France Italy Germany Poland Portugal Austria Sweden Finland AustraliaDenmark Switzerland Greece Israel Romania Spain CanadaBelgium Mexico Vietnam Chile South Africa Philippines Egypt Talkers AficionadosNetworkers Pragmatists % of consumers engaging in mobile internet use cases Countries rapidly transitioning to greater mobile data engagement ��������� ��������� ��������� ��������� 5% 9% 19% 67% 10% 25% 20% 45% 20% 35%17% 28% 31% 37% 14% 18% By 2020, these countries will represent: >80% of global subscribers, and >50% of global data revenue. As countries transition to greater mobile data engagement, their consumer segmentation is expected to reflect more affluent users with greater usage of mobile internet services.
  45. 45. 45 | Early adopters on the rise The presence of early adopters is projected to rise globally amongst smartphone users 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers Early adopters LaggardsEarly majority Late majority 2015 2030 2050 Percentage of smartphone subscribers by segment (adults only) Source: GSMA Intelligence
  46. 46. 46 | Early adopters on the rise ‘Mobile-first’ is a given for the millennials who show higher mobile data engagement than 35+ 35+ Millennials 35+ Millennials Northern Africa Western Europe Central/Eastern Europe East Asia/Pacific Latin America Northern Africa South Asia 5 SSA Middle East 21 Delta (PP) 17 10 10 9 9 2 1 1.1 2.4 Delta 1.8 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.6 0.6 0.6 85% 76% 68% 58% 55% 52% 63% 59% 58% 48% 46% 43% 47% 49% 65% 52% 51% 67% 7.3 6.4 5.7 4.8 4.8 4.0 2.9 4.9 4.5 4.0 3.2 3.4 2.4 1.8 2.8 4.9 3.4 5.5 Share of adult consumers who engage in mobile data use cases Source: GSMA Intelligence Regional Mobile Engagement Index by demographic Source: GSMA Intelligence The millennials are more likely to engage in mobile data services than the 35+ group. Yet, the mobile digital dividend between the millennials and the 35+ group is closing in the developing region where mobile phones are the primary device to access the internet for all. In contrast, while mobile-first is a given for the millennials in developed regions, the 35+ group might prefer engaging in laptops, PCs and tablets. The intensity of the engagement is greater amongst the millennials than the 35+ group. Despite having a reasonably high usage of data services in developing regions (~50% in most cases), engagement levels remain lower than in developed regions. The Middle East (Qatar, Saudi, Israel) shows relatively high usage and engagement, with the smallest gaps between the millennials and the 35+.
  47. 47. 47 | Early adopters on the rise US: the millennials are largely influencing future mobile user engagement patterns 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers Millenials Gen X Boomers Silent 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 2015 2030 2050 US projected population by generation (in millions) Source: Pew Research Center computations from US Census Bureau population projections released Dec 2014, and 2015 US Census Bureau population estimates US projected mobile consumer segmentation (as a percentage of smartphone subscribers, adults only) Source: GSMA Intelligence Millennials – people who are 18–34 today, born 1981–1997. Generation X – people who are 35–50 today, born 1965–1980. Baby Boomers – people who are 51–69 today, born 1946–1964. Silent – the generation of people who are >69 today, born before 1946.
  48. 48. 48 | Early adopters on the rise EU: the population is ageing, but the elders of tomorrow will be more connected than today 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers 2015 2030 205018–34 Old-age dependency ratio35–64 65+ 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 205020302015 28% 40% 51% EU projected population by age group (in thousands) Source: UN, World Population Prospects 2015 revisions EU projected mobile consumer segmentation (as a percentage of smartphone subscribers, adults only) Source: GSMA Intelligence
  49. 49. 49 | Early adopters on the rise Population is not ageing everywhere, demographic shifts differ in emerging markets 2015 2030 205018–34 Old-age dependency ratio35–64 65+ 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 205020302015 9% 12% 19% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers India, Egypt, Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa: Projected population by age group (in thousands) Source: UN, World Population Prospects 2015 revisions India, Egypt, Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa: Projected mobile consumer segmentation (as % of smartphone subscribers, adults only) Source: GSMA Intelligence
  50. 50. 50 | Early adopters on the rise Japan vs. US Great understanding Average understanding Not comfortable 55+ 44% 55+ 33% 59% 84% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% WorldUnited StatesJapanWorldUnited StatesJapan Age 55+Age 18–54 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers US Japan US Japan 90%67% 48% 69% 44% 59% 96% 71% 35+ Millennials 35+ Millennials US USJapan Japan US Japan Demographics Source: UN Usage of mobile internet use cases Social networking usage Source: GSMA Intelligence Smartphone ownership Source: GSMA Intelligence Tech-savviness by age and geography Source: GSMA Intelligence Despite having a high market saturation level like in the US (>80% unique subscriber penetration), Japan shows a relatively low level of mobile user engagement, driven by two factors: • A lower share of smartphone ownership • A larger prevalence of the elderly population, which is less tech-savvy and less engaged in mobile services than in a country like the US
  51. 51. 1 GMEI summary and findings Understanding regional consumer behaviour 2 Moving to smarter devices Mobile technology innovation is driving user engagement, but in some countries it is not the end game. 3 Living in a ‘data first’ world IP-comms continue to change the way we communicate, but mobile data services consumption varies by region. 4 Early adopters on the rise The next generational demographic shifts will change the profile of tomorrow’s mobile consumers. 5 Consumer segmentation, regional trends i Mapping the dominant consumer segments by country ii Aficionados – key characteristics iii Aficionados – regional distribution iv Aficionados – UK vs. India v Pragmatists – key characteristics vi Pragmatists – regional distribution vii Pragmatists – Spain vs. Mexico viii Networkers – key characteristics ix Networkers – regional distribution x Networkers – Germany vs. Kenya xi Talkers – key characteristics xii Talkers – regional distribution xiii Talkers – Australia vs. Thailand xiv Segmentation – regional comparison xv Segmentation – top countries by segment Data insights Appendix Summary
  52. 52. 52 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Mapping the dominant consumer segments by country Aficionados Pragmatists Networkers Talkers Russia China UzbekistanUzbekistan MoroccoMorocco MexicoMexico GuatemalaGuatemala NicaraguaNicaragua ColombiaColombia Puerto RicoPuerto Rico PakistanPakistan MozambiqueMozambique TanzaniaTanzania CameroonCameroonIvory Coast Ivory Coast ChileChile Sierra Leone Sierra Leone NicaraguaNicaragua KenyaKenya EthiopiaEthiopia IsraelIsrael PortugalPortugal United Kingdom United Kingdom SwedenSweden DenmarkDenmark FinlandFinland SpainSpain ItalyItaly GermanyGermany FranceFrance RomaniaRomania AustriaAustria SwitzerlandSwitzerland GreeceGreece DRC Egypt Algeria South Africa Ukraine US Brazil Argentina Canada Saudi Arabia Australia Indonesia Philippines Vietnam Korea Japan Thailand Myanmar Source: GSMA Intelligence * Countries not surveyed are shown in light grey
  53. 53. 53 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Aficionados – key characteristics Gender Age Tech-savviness Networks Wearables Smart TV Region M F 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ High Medium Low 2G 3G 4G Developed Developing 57% 43% 56% 22% 32% 23% 13% 22% 21% 20% 16% 13% 8%7% 3% 69% 29% 3% 39% 16% 45% 14% 49% 37% 47% 27% 6% 61% 22% 73% 37% 14% 39% 44% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Smartphone Non-smartphone 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day
  54. 54. 54 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Aficionados – regional distribution M iddle East W estern Europe N orth A m erica Sub-Saharan A frica EastA sia/ Pacific C entral/ Eastern Europe Latin A m erica SouthA sia N orthern A frica South Asia Northern Africa North America SSA Central/Eastern Europe Latam East Asia/Pacific Middle East Western Europe 36% 73% 27% 72% 28% 60% 40% 57% 43% 53% 47% 57% 43% 56% 44% 49% 51% 56% 44% 12% 12% 10% 9% 7% 3% 1% 11% Millennials 35+Smartphone users only
  55. 55. 55 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Aficionados – UK vs. India Age 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ 19% 36% 27% 11% 44% 28% 21% 7% 0% 0%4% 2% Tech-savviness High Medium Low 71% 29% 0% 77% 14% 9% Wearables UK India UK IndiaUK IndiaUK IndiaUK IndiaUK India 36% 5% Smart TV 71% 12% Networks 2G 3G 4G 15% 51% 34% 42% 7% 51% Gender M F 57% 43% 81% 19% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 India UK 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day Smartphone users only
  56. 56. 56 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Pragmatists – key characteristics Gender Age Tech-savviness Networks Wearables Smart TV Region M F 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ High Medium Low 2G 3G 4G Developed Developing 53% 47% 58% 22% 27% 20% 15% 10% 13% 15% 19% 20% 24%9% 7% 44% 49% 7% 19% 39% 42% 10% 41% 49% 62% 10% 3% 43% 3% 43% 23% 13% 25%42% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Smartphone Non-smartphone 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day
  57. 57. 57 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Pragmatists – regional distribution South Asia Northern Africa North America SSA Central/Eastern Europe Latam East Asia/Pacific Middle East Western Europe 34% 70% 30% 83% 17% 58% 41% 52% 48% 55% 45% 62% 39% 39% 60% 33% 68% 51% 49% 10% 14% 10% 7% 3% 4% 1% 16% Millennials 35+ M iddle East W estern Europe N orth A m erica Sub-Saharan A frica EastA sia/ Pacific C entral/ Eastern Europe Latin A m erica SouthA sia N orthern A frica Smartphone users only
  58. 58. 58 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Pragmatists – Spain vs. Mexico Age 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ 11% 17% 19% 21% 15% 16% 33% 32% 20% 11% 3% 0% 0% Tech-savviness High Medium Low 35% 59% 7% 0% 29% 6% 65% Wearables Spain Mexico Spain MexicoSpain MexicoSpain MexicoSpain MexicoSpain Mexico 19% 7% Smart TV 50% 64% Networks 2G 3G 4G 10% 41% 49% 8% 33% 59% Gender M F 53% 47% 55% 45% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Spain Mexico 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day Smartphone users only
  59. 59. 59 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Networkers – key characteristics Gender Age Tech-savviness Networks Wearables Smart TV Region M F 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ High Medium Low 2G 3G 4G Developed Developing 44% 56% 53% 22% 26% 21% 15% 24% 28% 20% 13% 9% 6% 9% 7% 29% 56% 15% 23% 29% 48% 15% 26% 59% 64% 4% 1% 27% 11% 35% 12% 6% 30%47% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Smartphone Non-smartphone 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day
  60. 60. 60 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Networkers – regional distribution South Asia Northern Africa North America SSA Central/Eastern Europe Latam East Asia/Pacific Middle East Western Europe 20% 66% 33% 76% 24% 48% 51% 44% 56% 55% 45% 63% 37% 20% 80% 23% 76% 50% 49% 6% 16% 6% 22% 2% 7% 2% 20% Millennials 35+ M iddle East W estern Europe N orth A m erica Sub-Saharan A frica EastA sia/ Pacific C entral/ Eastern Europe Latin A m erica SouthA sia N orthern A frica Smartphone users only
  61. 61. 61 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Networkers – Germany vs. Kenya Age 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ 6% 16% 20% 24% 17% 17% 33% 39% 17% 5% 4% 0% 0% Tech-savviness High Medium Low 19% 59% 22% 0% 34% 5% 61% Wearables Germany Kenya Germany KenyaGermany KenyaGermany KenyaGermany KenyaGermany Kenya 6% 0% Smart TV 30% 6% Networks 2G 3G 4G 37% 19% 43% 34% 5% 61% Gender M F 37% 63% 45% 55% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Germany Kenya 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day Smartphone users only
  62. 62. 62 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Talkers – key characteristics Gender Age Tech-savviness Networks Wearables Smart TV Region M F 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ High Medium Low 2G 3G 4G Developed Developing 49% 51% 48% 12% 18% 19% 20% 11% 15% 17% 20% 17% 19% 16% 15% 19% 47% 34% 7% 63% 30% 29% 22% 48% 81% 4% 1% 24% 8% 43% 16% 4% 15% 52% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Smartphone Non-smartphone 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day
  63. 63. 63 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Talkers – regional distribution South Asia Northern Africa North America SSA Central/Eastern Europe Latam East Asia/Pacific Middle East Western Europe 20% 43% 57% 66% 35% 23% 76% 17% 83% 28% 71% 52% 48% 12% 87% 11% 90% 52% 49% 5% 18% 6% 28% 2% 6% 6% 10% Millennials 35+ M iddle East W estern Europe N orth A m erica Sub-Saharan A frica EastA sia/ Pacific C entral/ Eastern Europe Latin A m erica SouthA sia N orthern A frica Smartphone users only
  64. 64. 64 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Talkers – Australia vs. Thailand Age 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 64+ 5% 7% 13% 23% 22% 29% 15% 4% 19% 30% 18% 15% 0% 0% Tech-savviness High Medium Low 15% 58% 26% 0% 8% 56% 36% Wearables Australia Thailand Australia ThailandAustralia ThailandAustralia ThailandAustralia ThailandAustralia Thailand 12% 0% Smart TV 32% 3% Networks 2G 3G 4G 7% 44% 49% 5% 11% 84% Gender M F 57% 43% 48% 52% 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Australia Thailand 1 Never 2 Less than once a month 3 Every month 4 Every week 5 Every day Smartphone users only
  65. 65. 65 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Segmentation – regional comparison Aficionados Pragmatists Reporters Talkers 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% South AsiaSSANorthern AfricaEast Asia/PacificLatamCentral/Eastern EuropeMiddle EastWestern EuropeNorth America Smartphone users only
  66. 66. 66 | Consumer segmentation, regional trends Segmentation – top countries by segment Aficionados Pragmatists Reporters Talkers 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Puerto Rico GreeceQatarUnited Kingdom AustraliaKorea, South SpainRomaniaUSASaudi Arabia 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% D enm ark SaudiA rabia Portugal Rom ania G reece Finland A ustria Sw itzerland Q atar Israel 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% N igeria M exico A rgentina C olom bia Q atar N icaragua South A frica Philippines G uatem ala Thailand 0% 20% 40% 60% Indonesia Egypt Ivory C oast M yanm ar Sierra Leone U zbekistan India Ethiopia Pakistan D R C Aficionados Networkers Pragmatists Talkers Smartphone users only 80%
  67. 67. About us
  68. 68. 68 | About us Authors Joss Gillet Director, Data Products Joss manages the GSMA Intelligence analyst team and is responsible for data products and partnerships. He joined ten years ago as a senior analyst, looking after mobile network technology migration and overall research and forecast accuracy. Before GSMA Intelligence, Joss worked at Ovum Ltd and for Motorola’s Mobile Devices Division in the UK. He joined Motorola as a product analyst before managing its market intelligence activities in Europe. He holds an MA in International Business from Portsmouth Business School and a certificate in International Political Theory from the University of London. Michael Meyer Analyst, Consumer Survey Michael joined GSMA Intelligence as an analyst focusing on the analysis and dissemination of the GSMA’s global consumer survey results. Before GSMA Intelligence, Michael worked as a market analyst for Frost & Sullivan and as a market researcher for NOP and Fieldwork International (IPSOS). Michael holds an MSc (PgDip) from Kingston University London and a certificate in Quantitative Economic Methods from London Birkbeck University. Barbara Arese Lucini Senior Analyst Barbara is a Senior Analyst at GSMA Intelligence focusing on research for emerging markets. Before joining the GSMA in April 2013, Barbara worked for FrontlineSMS in London and at Accenture in Italy. She holds an MSc in Development Studies from SOAS, London and an undergraduate in Mathematics from Università Statale di Milano, Italy.
  69. 69. Whilst every care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this material, the facts, estimates and opinions stated are based on information and sources which, while we believe them to be reliable, are not guaranteed. In particular, it should not be relied upon as the sole source of reference in relation to the subject matter. No liability can be accepted by GSMA Intelligence, its directors or employees for any loss occasioned to any person or entity acting or failing to act as a result of anything contained in or omitted from the content of this material, or our conclusions as stated. The findings are GSMA Intelligence’s current opinions; they are subject to change without notice. The views expressed may not be the same as those of the GSM Association. GSMA Intelligence has no obligation to update or amend the research or to let anyone know if our opinions change materially. © GSMA Intelligence 2017. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited. Please contact us at info@gsmaintelligence.com or visit gsmaintelligence.com. GSMA Intelligence does not reflect the views of the GSM Association, its subsidiaries or its members. GSMA Intelligence does not endorse companies or their products. GSMA Intelligence, The Walbrook Building, 25 Walbrook, London EC4N 8AF GSMA Intelligence is the definitive source of mobile operator data, analysis and forecasts, delivering the most accurate and complete set of industry metrics available. Relied on by a customer base of over 800 of the world’s leading mobile operators, device vendors, equipment manufacturers and financial and consultancy firms, the data set is the most scrutinised in the industry. With over 30 million individual data points (updated daily), the service provides coverage of the performance of all 1,400+ operators and 1,200+ MVNOs across 4,500+ networks, 77 groups and 239 countries and territories worldwide. About GSMA Intelligence © GSMA Intelligence gsmaintelligence.com • info@gsmaintelligence.com • @GSMAi

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