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Marketing in Japan: Section 2 Part 2 of 3

A look at what affects marketing in Japan. From the symbolism of colors to the meaning of numbers and a summary of Hofstede's cultural dimensions.

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Marketing in Japan: Section 2 Part 2 of 3

  1. 1. Marketing in Japan: Section 2 Part 2 of 3: Marketing in Japan best practices and business insights.
  2. 2. Table of Contents: Page Name: Page Number: Business Practices 3 5 Steps to Marketing In Japan 4 How to Launch a Product in Japan 11 Tips to Marketing In Japan 28 Symbolism in Japan 44 Business Insights 57 Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions 58 Business Facts 78 Business Etiquette 98 Business Differences: US vs. Japan 123 Work Cited 135
  3. 3. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors Black Kuro Blue Ao White Shiro Green Midori Red Aka Others Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com 黒 白 緑 赤 青
  4. 4. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors Black Represents: Formality And Elegance: Started because of the popularity of Western black tie events Death, Destruction, Doom, Fear And Sorrow: When used alone, it signifies mourning and misfortune, and is often worn to funerals Dignity And Formality: Used for the robes of Buddhist monks, as well as for montsuki (紋付), the kimono that bears the family crest Black Is A Powerful And Foreboding Color In Japanese Culture 黒 Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com
  5. 5. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors Whiterepresents: Purity and cleanliness in traditional Japanese society, it is seen as a blessed color Used at weddings and other joyful life events Appears on the Japanese flag Godly and Pure: Sacred places are strung with shimenawa(注連縄) Sacred places are decorated with white shide (紙垂), or strewn with white pebbles or sand 白 White Has Been An Auspicious Color In Japan For Much Of Its History Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com
  6. 6. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors Energy Vitality Heat Power Love And Intimacy Sexual Desire Life Force In People Energy In People 赤 Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com Red has been a powerful color in Japanese society, representing strong emotions rather than ideas
  7. 7. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors It’s The Color Of The Sun In: •It’s seen on the Japanese flag Associated With Authority And Wealth: •As attested to by red-sheathed samurai swords and ornamental combs Has Ties To Religion: •As demonstrated by the red torii (鳥居) of Shinto shrines •Shrine maidens are traditionally clad in red hakama (袴) 赤 Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com
  8. 8. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors Purity and cleanliness in traditional Japanese culture Largely because of the vast stretches of blue water that surrounds the Japanese islands Considered a feminine color Worn by young women to show their purity Calmness and stability It’s a relaxing color 青 Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com Represents:
  9. 9. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors • Mostly sometsuke (染付け) porcelain Ceramics: • Mostly the aizuri-e (藍摺り絵) woodblock prints Fine Art: • Flourished in Shikoku during the Edo period Formed The Basis For The Indigo Dyeing Industry: 青 Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com Blue is Used For:
  10. 10. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors Green shows Fertility and growth in traditional Japanese culture Midori means green and vegetation The color green represents youth and vitality Green can also represent eternity because evergreen trees never lose their leaves or stop growing Green is fresh and youthful different from the negative western connotations of “green-eyed jealousy” 緑 Compiled By author from japanese.about.com tofugu.com ehow.com
  11. 11. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Colors Other Colors: The following symbolizes the rank and authority of the Japanese royalty and aristocracy: Yellowish-brown Orange Purple Chairo Daidaiiro Murasaki Compiled By author from tofugu.com ehow.com japanese.about.com 茶色 橙色 紫
  12. 12. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Numbers LuckyNumbers: • 8 (Hachi): its written as 八 in Kanji • 八 is considered 末広がり Suehirogari from its shape which widens toward the end • Suehirogari is to become more and more prosperous as time goes LuckyNumbers: • 7(Nana): comes from Western culture • Japanese likes to choose 7 in any occasion Compiled By author from discover-jp.blogspot.com
  13. 13. Marketing In Japan: Symbolism- Numbers UnluckyNumbers: •4 is pronounced yon or shi •Shi has the same pronunciation with 死 which means die •People are in the habit of not using 4 in hospitals and congratulations occasions UnluckyNumbers: •9 is pronounced kyu or ku •ku has the same pronunciation with 苦 which means pain or suffering •49 yonjûkyu/shijûku is a super unlucky number because it means die with pain UnluckyNumbers: •The number 14 is bad luck •It sounds like the word shuh-shuh, which sounds like the word for death Compiled By author from discover-jp.blogspot.com
  14. 14. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- 54 46 95 92 88 42 Power Distance Individualism Masculintiy Uncertainty Avoidance Long Tern Orientation Indulgence Japan: Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com
  15. 15. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Power Distance: The extent that less powerful members of institutions and organizations within a country expect and accept that power is distributed unequally This dimension deals with the fact that individuals in societies are not equal – it states the attitude of the culture towards these inequalities Japan has a intermediate score of 54, which makes it a borderline hierarchical society They are conscious of their hierarchical position but they are not as hierarchical as other Asian cultures Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Power Distance:
  16. 16. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Individualism: The degree of interdependence a society keeps among its members It has to do with whether people’s self- image is defined in terms of “I” or “We” In Individualist societies people are supposed to look after themselves and their direct family only In Collectivist societies people belong to ‘in groups’ that take care of them in exchange for loyalty Japan scores 46 on the Individualism dimension Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Individualism:
  17. 17. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Reasons why Japan isn’t as collectivistic as other societies: They do not have an extended family system which forms a base of more collectivistic societies such as China and Korea Japan has been a paternalistic society Younger siblings had to leave home and make their own living with their core families Oldest son inherited the family name and assets from his father Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Individualism:
  18. 18. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- They are Individualist by Asian standards Or They are collectivistic by Western standards Japanese in-group is depended on the situation Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Individualism:
  19. 19. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Masculinity: What motivates people, wanting to be the best (Masculine) or liking what they do (Feminine) A high score (Masculine) indicates that the society will be driven by competition, achievement and success Success is defined by the winner / best in field – a value system that starts in school and continues throughout organizational life A low score (Feminine) means that the dominant values in the society are caring for others and quality of life A Feminine society is one where quality of life is the sign of success and standing out from the crowd is not admirable At 95, Japan is one of the most Masculine societies in the world Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Masculinity:
  20. 20. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Expression of Masculinity in Japan that are seen in every aspect of life: The drive for excellence and perfection in their Material Production- Monodukuri Material Services- Hotels And Restaurants Presentation- Gift wrapping and food presentation Notorious workaholism Working hard and long hours makes it difficult for women to climb up the corporate ladders Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Masculinity:
  21. 21. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Uncertainty Avoidance: The way a society deals with the fact that the future can never be known: Should we try to control the future or just let it happen? This brings anxiety and different cultures have learnt to deal with this anxiety in different ways The score takes into account: How members feel threatened by an ambiguous or unknown situation As well as the created beliefs and institutions that they use to try to avoid those situations At 92 Japan is one of the most uncertainty avoiding country on earth Uncertainty Avoidance: Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com
  22. 22. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Fromcradletograve,lifeishighly ritualizedandtheyhavealotof ceremonies: Every school year, they have an opening and closing ceremony that is conducted the same way everywhere in Japan etiquette books suggest in great detail what people wear and how people should behave at weddings, funerals and other social events School teachers and public servants are hesitant to do things without precedence In corporate Japan, a lot of time and effort is put into feasibility studies: all the risk factors must be worked out before any project can start Managers ask for all the detailed facts and figures before making any decision Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Uncertainty Avoidance: This high need for Uncertainty Avoidance is one of the reasons why changes are so difficult to realize in Japan
  23. 23. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Long Term Orientation: How societies have to maintain some links with its own past while dealing with the challenges of the present and future Societies prioritize these two existential goals differently Normative Societies- Scores are low, prefer to maintain time- honored traditions and norms while viewing societal change with suspicion Pragmatic Approach: Scores are high, they encourage thrift and efforts in modern education as a way to prepare for the future At 88 Japan scores as one of the most Long Term Orientation oriented societies Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Long Term Orientation:
  24. 24. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- In corporate Japan, long term orientation is seen in: All of these examples serve the durability of the companies: Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Long Term Orientation: The high rate of investment in R&D even in economically difficult times Higher own capital rate Priority to steady growth of market share rather than to a quarterly profit Companies are not here to make money every quarter for the share holders They are to serve the stake holders and society at large for many generations to come (e.g. Matsuhista)
  25. 25. Marketing in Japan: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions- Indulgence: The extent to which people try to control their desires and impulses, based on the way they were raised The degree to which small children are socialized is a factor of this dimension Without socialization we don’t become “human” Relatively weak control is called “Indulgence” Relatively strong control is called “Restraint” Japan has a low score of 42,it is a culture of Restraint Compiled By author from geert-hofstede.com Indulgence:
  26. 26. Contact Us for the Full Presentation: Mediacontact USA Inc. 13575 58TH Street North #160 Clearwater, Fl. 33760 T: 727 538 4112 E: contact@mcusa.co www.mediacontactusa.com
  27. 27. Work Cited:  "5 Steps to Marketing in Japan." Hawaii Business Magazine. 2011. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/5-steps-to- marketing-in-japan/>.  "10 Cultural Contrasts between US & Japanese Companies." Freshtrax by Btrax. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://blog.btrax.com/en/2010/12/15/10-cultural-contrasts-between-us-and-japanese-companies-a-personal-view/>.  "Discover Japan!" : Luck and Unlucky Number. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://discover-jp.blogspot.com/2006/11/luck-and-unlucky- number.html>.  "Here’s What You Need To Know When Marketing To Japanese Consumers."VoiceBunny Blog. 2015. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://voicebunny.com/blog/heres-need-know-marketing-japanese-consumers/>.  "International Business: Marketing in Asia by the Numbers: Numerology Affects International Business." DeseretNews.com. 2011. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705394498/Marketing-in-Asia-by-the-numbers-Numerology-affects-international- business.html?pg=all>.  "Japan Business Etiquette, Culture, & Manners." Japan. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://www.cyborlink.com/besite/japan.htm>.  "Japan: It's Better in Color - Tofugu." Tofugu. 2012. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://www.tofugu.com/2012/06/28/japan-its-better-in- color/>.  "Japanese Colors Vocabulary - Learn Japanese Colors Vocabulary." About.com Education. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://japanese.about.com/od/japanesevocabulary/a/Colors.htm>.  "Launching a Product in Japan: 5 Action Points Dos & Don’ts."MarketingSherpa.com. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <https://www.marketingsherpa.com/article/interview/5-action-points-dos-donts>.  Mathers, Cassandra. "What Is the Meaning of Color in Japanese Culture?" EHow. Demand Media. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://www.ehow.com/about_6658499_meaning-color-japanese-culture_.html>.  Martinuzzi, Bruna. "Doing Business in Japan: 10 Etiquette Rules You Should Know." American Express, 5 Aug. 2013. Web. 1 Mar. 2016. <https://www.americanexpress.com/us/small-business/openforum/articles/doing-business-in-japan-10-etiquette-rules-you-should- know/>.  "What about Japan?" Japan. Web. 01 Mar. 2016. <http://geert-hofstede.com/japan.html>.

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