Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

How to measure success - Agile Tour 2019 Dublin

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 32 Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Similaire à How to measure success - Agile Tour 2019 Dublin (20)

Publicité

Plus par Orderly Disruption (16)

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

How to measure success - Agile Tour 2019 Dublin

  1. 1. How to measure success? John Coleman, PST, LSFT, Tameflow Kanban Marshall Goldsmith #LEAD60 @JohnColemanIRL
  2. 2. What is organizational agility?
  3. 3. What is success? To measure, it’s more useful to know why we’re changing and what good looks like
  4. 4. Let’s imagine a scenario For what to measure, whether to measure
  5. 5. Let’s consider the quality of measures activities, outputs, outcomes, impact leading indicators, lagging indicators
  6. 6. Unintended consequences of comparing teams? Gaming Measurements lose their value
  7. 7. What matters most Getting better Getting worse
  8. 8. Are we missing a trick? Mind the Gap Over-playing
  9. 9. Scrum.org’s Evidence Based Management
  10. 10. Quantitative Leading Number of PBIs 85th percentile Cycle Time Practices ??? Potential value delivered Lagging xxxxxxx Value confirmed via yyyyyyyyyy Employee engagement Customer satisfaction
  11. 11. Qualitative • Interview teams and capture trends in performance & feel • Interview teams and capture how leaders are showing up • Star rate the journey, and if less than 5 give specific comments to help improve without proving any hints of who is making the comments
  12. 12. But for many teams outside my sphere of influence the needles didn’t move
  13. 13. Team maturity Just consider for all teams to avoid ranking Scrum Master Product Owner Development Team LeaderMaturity Level 1 2 3 4 5 How mature is your Scrum Team? Content on this poster is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International-License Leads & stimulates everyone in the organi- zationvalue stream to success Enables the organization to continuously have impact on customers Helps the organization to understand & apply Agile principles Focus on continuous improvement in the organization Teaches others how to combine Scrum with additional practices Leads & stimulates his entire team to suc- cess Enables the Scrum team to continuously improve and deliver value Helps stakeholders to understand & apply Agile principles Focus on continuous improvement in the value chain Extended Scrum experience with Scrum and additional practices Stimulates team members in taking re- sponsibility & become succesfull Enables the Product Owner to focus on value delivery and visualize progress Helps his team to understand & apply the ScrumAgile values Focus on continuous improvement in the team Extended Scrum experience & experi- ments with additional practices Guides team members in understanding their role & apply Scrum ‘By the Book’ Enables the Development Team to track progress & visualize work Facilitates team events using ScrumAgile values as a guide Focus on connecting practices with goals and outcomes Has situational experience in running Scrum ‘By the Book’ Executing operational work & searching for personal development Tracks progress & visualizes work Plans & facilitates all Scrum events Focus on learning new practices and oper- ational successes Learns how to apply Scrum ‘by the book’ Is able to lead complex value chains with multiple teams & stakeholders Has impact on customer happiness based on continuous value delivery Is responsible for planningbudgetprofit & loss of the products’ value chain Focus on continuous value optimizing and customer collaboration Deep knowledge on onemore product portfolio(s) Can lead a value chain with multiple teams & stakeholders Has impact on all stakeholders based on frequent value creation Has the mandate to make product related decisions and release plans Focus on continuous value creation and stakeholder collaboration Deep knowledge of the productvalue chaincustomers Inspires his team to collaborate with all stakeholders in the value chain Has impact on stakeholders through con- tinuous outcome Collaborates with stakeholders to make plans & product related decisions Focus on creating value & progress Has overview on all steps in the value cre- ation process Is able to collaborate with multiple stake- holders from a single Product Backlog Gains more trust by increasing transpar- ancy progress & output Has influence on stakeholders in making plans & product related decisions Focus on creating sprint goals & product increments Owns & manages the Product Backlog Is able to translate stakeholders wishes into concrete work items for a team Satisfies stakeholders by capturing re- quirements and feedback Executes plans & product decisions made by stakeholders Focus on creating requirements & Product Backlog items Analytical knowledge & basic product knowledge Team members trust each other blindly Delivering value on a frequent basis con- firmed by actual users Collaborating with everyone to participate in sharing feedback & learning Accountable or creating high quality prod- ucts Intuitively acting on commonly shared standards Trust & respect are the basis of all acting Working with stakeholders to deliver high quality product increments Collaborating with stakeholders to contin- uously improve Responsible and committed to frequently deliver valuable outcome Standards are continuously usedchal- lengedupdated Team members are open Actively asking for feedback to have more impact on stakeholders Using ScrumAgile values as a guideline for all interaction Focussed on reaching sprint goals & im- proving quality Common standards are discoveredcap- turednew insights created Looking for common understanding Working on explicit measurements of suc- cess Discovering differencesconflictshared values Ensuring the outcome of all events & learning the Scrum values Knowledgepracticesquality standards are shareddiscussed Looking for stabilityresta sense of be- longing Following processesrulesinstructions Avoiding conflictpursuing individual tar- getsgenerating output Relying on the Scrum Master to facilitate them Individual knowledgestandards deter- mine what tasks people work on Delegates all decisions & responsibilities Facilites people & organization to act with a Greater Goal in mind Facilitates entrepreneurship & growth for every employee Inspiresguards culturestimulates con- tinuous improvement Delegates responsibility for the full Value Chain to the PO & his team Delegates all but critical decisions & re- sponsibilities Provides a vision & mission and that peo- ple can connect to Creates an environment where teams can self-organize & create value Gives advicecoachesfacilitates Delegates planning & execution to the Product Owner Delegates more important responsibilities Tracks progress by regularly visiting team events Provides boundary conditions for teams to set their own targets Ensures consensus on rulesplansquali- ty standards. Co-creates plans together with the Prod- uct Owner Wants to be in control & delegates less critical responsibilities Asks for explicit measurements of prog- ressoutputquality Gives team(s) targets and on progressef- ficiencyqualityoutcome Arranges buy-in to rulesplansquality standards. Creates plans and delegates execution to the Product Owner Wants full control & has a directive com- munication style Progress is measured by profit & share- holder happiness Gives individual targets and on progress efficiencyquality &outcome Ensures compliance to rulesplan execu- tionquality targets. Creates plansrulescontrols budget
  14. 14. For low maturity teams, it’s sensible to measure practices before “needles move” If you had these stats, hope shoudn’t be the strategy….focus on discipline needed • 89% used sprints, 61% used events regularly even though it’s complex work • 53% had a DoD that was respected and continuously improved • 71% had daily meetings • 39% used relative sizing or right sizing • 21% did product backlog refinement, • 2 teams used Monte Carlo • 88% were good with time management and didn’t have an unplanned leave problem • 2 week sprints for many but only 3 teams had 85th percentile of 12 days or less • Most teams fed a value chain and didn’t generate any real value themselves • 2 teams doubled throughput and also managed to reduced cycle times • Most teams have not reduced cycle time significantly in the last 12 months, due to lack of passion, focus & energy for continuous improvement • Most “Kanban teams” had neither WIP limits nor workflow policies • Less than 33% had a solid team launch
  15. 15. No declared negative unintended consequences from agility Markup denotes updates March 20XX to July 20YY green shows improvement red shows disimprovement Jan-Mar Vs Jan-Jul red shows dis-improvement Jan-Mar Vs Jan-Jul
  16. 16. green shows improvement red shows disimprovement
  17. 17. Let’s imagine.. You had executive leaders as follows….what would you do?
  18. 18. Scrum.org 21st century executive leadershipLicensed under CC “I agree / strongly agree” qualifies …. “somewhat agree” does not qualify The journey to enabling success Step 1 Apprentice exit criteria (motivating people) • Only 31% stopped irrefutable demands • Only 32% reviewing performance trends and limits to growth • 60% aware of the bottlenecks Step 2 Tiger exit criteria (begin migration to product/job teams) • 48% shifting from broadcast to dialogue • Only 27% keeping long term stable teams • Only 27% valuing team performance over “star performers” The journey to long term success Step 3 Impediment Blaster exit criteria (org redesign) • Only 25% support bets < 3 month • 49% short-lived impediments • 44% value impact over efficiency • 40% optimising e2e • 48% embracing uncertainty • Only 27% blasting bottlenecks • 33% Moving to long term contracts Step 4 System Inverter exit criteria (inspiring people) • Only 31% ruthless with value and compassionate with people • Only 40% considering values and trends more important than targets • Only 29% value effectiveness over efficiency Step 5 Guardian of the Culture
  19. 19. Scrum.org 21st century executive leadershipLicensed under CC “I agree / strongly agree” qualifies …. “somewhat agree” does not qualify The journey to enabling success Step 1 Apprentice exit criteria (motivating people) • Only 29% stopped irrefutable demands • Only 31% reviewing performance trends and limits to growth • 65% aware of the bottlenecks Step 2 Tiger exit criteria (begin migration to product/job teams) • 48% shifting from broadcast to dialogue • Only 27% keeping long term stable teams • Only 27% valuing team performance over “star performers” The journey to long term success Step 3 Impediment Blaster exit criteria (org redesign) • Only 25% support bets < 3 month • 49% short-lived impediments • 44% value impact over efficiency • 40% optimising e2e • 48% embracing uncertainty • Only 27% blasting bottlenecks • 33% Moving to long term contracts Step 4 System Inverter exit criteria (inspiring people) • Only 31% ruthless with value and compassionate with people • Only 40% considering values and trends more important than targets • Only 29% value effectiveness over efficiency Step 5 Guardian of the Culture
  20. 20. Scrum.org 21st century executive leadershipLicensed under CC “I agree / strongly agree” qualifies …. “somewhat agree” does not qualify The journey to enabling success Step 1 Apprentice exit criteria (motivating people) • Only 29% stopped irrefutable demands • Only 31% reviewing performance trends and limits to growth • 65% aware of the bottlenecks Step 2 Tiger exit criteria (begin migration to product/job teams) • 47% shifting from broadcast to dialogue • Only 25% keeping long term stable teams • Only 26% valuing team performance over “star performers” The journey to long term success Step 3 Impediment Blaster exit criteria (org redesign) • Only 25% support bets < 3 month • 49% short-lived impediments • 44% value impact over efficiency • 40% optimising e2e • 48% embracing uncertainty • Only 27% blasting bottlenecks • 33% Moving to long term contracts Step 4 System Inverter exit criteria (inspiring people) • Only 31% ruthless with value and compassionate with people • Only 40% considering values and trends more important than targets • Only 29% value effectiveness over efficiency Step 5 Guardian of the Culture
  21. 21. Scrum.org 21st century executive leadershipLicensed under CC “I agree / strongly agree” qualifies …. “somewhat agree” does not qualify The journey to enabling success Step 1 Apprentice exit criteria (motivating people) • Only 29% stopped irrefutable demands • Only 31% reviewing performance trends and limits to growth • 65% aware of the bottlenecks Step 2 Tiger exit criteria (begin migration to product/job teams) • 47% shifting from broadcast to dialogue • Only 25% keeping long term stable teams • Only 26% valuing team performance over “star performers” The journey to long term success Step 3 Impediment Blaster exit criteria (org redesign) • Only 24% support bets < 3 month • 48% short-lived impediments • 43% value impact over efficiency • 39% optimising e2e • 47% embracing uncertainty • Only 26% blasting bottlenecks • 32% Moving to long term contracts Step 4 System Inverter exit criteria (inspiring people) • Only 31% ruthless with value and compassionate with people • Only 40% considering values and trends more important than targets • Only 29% value effectiveness over efficiency Step 5 Guardian of the Culture
  22. 22. Scrum.org 21st century executive leadershipLicensed under CC “I agree / strongly agree” qualifies …. “somewhat agree” does not qualify The journey to enabling success Step 1 Apprentice exit criteria (motivating people) • Only 29% stopped irrefutable demands • Only 31% reviewing performance trends and limits to growth • 65% aware of the bottlenecks Step 2 Tiger exit criteria (begin migration to product/job teams) • 47% shifting from broadcast to dialogue • Only 25% keeping long term stable teams • Only 26% valuing team performance over “star performers” The journey to long term success Step 3 Impediment Blaster exit criteria (org redesign) • Only 24% support bets < 3 month • 48% short-lived impediments • 43% value impact over efficiency • 39% optimising e2e • 47% embracing uncertainty • Only 26% blasting bottlenecks • 32% Moving to long term contracts Step 4 System Inverter exit criteria (inspiring people) • Only 32% ruthless with value and compassionate with people • Only 41% considering values and trends more important than targets • Only 31% value effectiveness over efficiency Step 5 Guardian of the Culture
  23. 23. A wise man told me… It’s about inspiring people…. even if they leave Thank you! https://www.scrum.org/resources/blog?uid=217428 https://Ace.works/blog https://Valueglide.com/blog https://ace.works/TrainingEvents @JohnColemanIRL

×