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Play Framework + 

Docker + CircleCI + AWS =
An Automated Microservice 

Build Pipeline
Josh Padnick
Wednesday, November 1...
What do I want out of a
Java-based microservices
infrastructure?
Java-Based
• Java-based (or modern hipster JVM language)
• No Java EE
• Reload without compile (e.g. refresh the browser)
...
Microservices Infrastructure
• A Universal unit of deployment (i.e. Docker)
• Continuous integration
• Continuous deployme...
Does this mythical
beast exist?
Actually, it’s increasingly
less mythical.
Padnick
Josh
• Full-stack engineer for 12+ years
• Professional AWS & DevOps Guy via Phoenix DevOps
• Experienced Java pro...
DevOps & AWS
• I wrote a 12,000+ word article on building
scalable web apps on AWS at https://goo.gl/
aD6gNC
• See JoshPad...
Today’s talk is about
putting together a quick
but scalable solution for
this problem.
First we’ll cover the 

big picture concepts.
Then we’ll show it working.
We’ll end by talking about how it
could be even ...
Let’s start with
the world’s most generic
build pipeline
VCS
Developer commits code to Version Control System.
VCS
VCS notifies Build Server we have a new build.
Build Server
VCS
Build Server
- build/compile
- run the “fast” automated tests
- prepare a deployment artifact
Build Server
VCS Build Server
Build server pushes deployment artifact to artifact
repository.
Artifact
Repository
VCS Build Server
We’d like to do Continuous Deployment.
So let’s assume this was a deployable commit.
We immediately deplo...
VCS Build Server
Artifact
Repository
Deploy to infrastructure.
Now let’s pick our
technologies.
Docker Hub
Developer commits code to GitHub.
Options
• GitHub

De facto source control system.
• BitBucket

Hosted but more enterprisey. Theoretical tighter
integratio...
GitHub uses web hooks to automatically kick
off a build in CircleCI.
Options
• CircleCI

Hosted build tool. Awesome UI. Get up and running in an hour or
less. But no first-class support for Do...
Docker Hub
Circle will:
- build/compile
- run automated tests
- build a docker image
- push image to Docker Hub
Options
• Docker Hub

The “official” place to house Docker registries. Free for public repos; paid for
private. Poor UI, so...
Docker Hub
Docker Hub
Deploy to AWS.
Options
• Let’s just assume all AWS for now.
Options within AWS
• AWS EC2 Container Service (ECS)

Amazon’s solution for running multiple services on a single VM in do...
What about our 

app code?
Let’s talk about it.
• Re-architected the web framework from scratch.
• Nice dev workflow
• Young enough to be hipster; mature enough to be
stab...
Live Demo
Now let’s build up our
build pipeline live.
Step #1:
Create a base 

docker image
• We may have many different microservices using
Docker.
• A common base image = standardization
• See my base docker imag...
• # BUILD THE BASE CONTAINER

cd /repos/phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base

docker build -t "phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base:3.2" .

dock...
Step #2:
Create a base Play
Framework docker image
• We may have many different microservices using Play.
• Also, one of Play’s downsides is that Activator (which is
really ...
• # BUILD THE BASE PLAY CONTAINER

cd /repos/phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base-play

docker build -t "phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base-pl...
Step #3:
Take our Play app and build
a Docker image out of it.
• SBT includes a “dist” plugin that will create an
executable binary for our entire Play app!
• We’ll run that and make th...
• # BUILD A PLAY APP IN A CONTAINER

cd /repos/phxdevops/phxjug-play-framework-demo

docker build -t "phxdevops/phxjug-pla...
Step #4:
Define our ECS
Infrastructure in AWS.
Options
• Point and click around the AWS Web Console

Good for learning. Bad for long-term maintainability
• AWS CloudForm...
Our Choice
• We’ll use terraform.
• To save time, I’ve already provisioned the
infrastructure for today.
• But you can see...
Wait, how does 

ECS work?
Key ECS Concepts
• Cluster
• Container Instances
Cluster
Container
Instance
Container
Instance
Container
Instance
Key Concepts
• Task Definitions
Task Definitions
• JSON object
• Describes how 1 or more containers should be
run and possibly links Container A to Contain...
Components of a 

Task Definition
• Task Family Name (e.g. “MyApp”)
• 1 or more container definitions:
• docker run command ...
Deploying new versions of
your app
• All your app’s versions are individual “Task
Definitions” within a “Task Definition Fam...
Key Concepts
• Task Definitions
• Task Definition Families
• Tasks
• Services
Task Definition
Task
Task
Task
Task
Tasks
• An “instance” of a Task Definition is a Task.
• Really, this just means a single Docker container
(or a “group” of ...
Tasks as Services
• Should your task always remain running?
• Should it be auto-restarted if it fails?
• Might it need an ...
Tasks and Services
• Note that the same Task Definition…
• …can be used to run as a one-time Task
• …or a long-running Serv...
Task
Task
Task
Task
Task
ECS Pro’s
• Very little to manage.
• Built-in service discovery, cluster state management, and container
scheduler.
• Allo...
ECS Con’s
• Default Service Discovery:

One ELB per service = $18/service per month
—> potentially expensive
• Less flexibl...
Live Clickthrough
Step #5:
Configure our Play app
for circle.yml
• See https://github.com/PhoenixDevOps/phxjug-
play-framework-demo/blob/master/circle.yml
Now let’s see it all live
in action!
Q&A
Play Framework + Docker + CircleCI + AWS + EC2 Container Service
Play Framework + Docker + CircleCI + AWS + EC2 Container Service
Play Framework + Docker + CircleCI + AWS + EC2 Container Service
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Play Framework + Docker + CircleCI + AWS + EC2 Container Service

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Setting up a continuous delivery pipeline using Play Framework, Docker, AWS, and other tools.

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Play Framework + Docker + CircleCI + AWS + EC2 Container Service

  1. 1. Play Framework + 
 Docker + CircleCI + AWS = An Automated Microservice 
 Build Pipeline Josh Padnick Wednesday, November 11, 2015 josh@PhoenixDevOps.com @OhMyGoshJosh
  2. 2. What do I want out of a Java-based microservices infrastructure?
  3. 3. Java-Based • Java-based (or modern hipster JVM language) • No Java EE • Reload without compile (e.g. refresh the browser) • Native support for JSON, REST, and Websockets • Supports “reactive” mindset (async, non-blocking, etc.)
  4. 4. Microservices Infrastructure • A Universal unit of deployment (i.e. Docker) • Continuous integration • Continuous deployment • Ability to run multiple containerized services on the same VM • Simple setup • Long-term scalability • Minimal “undifferentiated heavy lifting”
  5. 5. Does this mythical beast exist?
  6. 6. Actually, it’s increasingly less mythical.
  7. 7. Padnick Josh • Full-stack engineer for 12+ years • Professional AWS & DevOps Guy via Phoenix DevOps • Experienced Java programmer
 Lover of Scala
 Favorite Web Framework is Play Framework • josh@PhoenixDevOps.com
 @OhMyGoshJosh
  8. 8. DevOps & AWS • I wrote a 12,000+ word article on building scalable web apps on AWS at https://goo.gl/ aD6gNC • See JoshPadnick.com for prior DevOps & AWS presentations. • Interested in getting in touch? Contact me via PhoenixDevOps.com.
  9. 9. Today’s talk is about putting together a quick but scalable solution for this problem.
  10. 10. First we’ll cover the 
 big picture concepts. Then we’ll show it working. We’ll end by talking about how it could be even better.
  11. 11. Let’s start with the world’s most generic build pipeline
  12. 12. VCS Developer commits code to Version Control System.
  13. 13. VCS VCS notifies Build Server we have a new build. Build Server
  14. 14. VCS Build Server - build/compile - run the “fast” automated tests - prepare a deployment artifact Build Server
  15. 15. VCS Build Server Build server pushes deployment artifact to artifact repository. Artifact Repository
  16. 16. VCS Build Server We’d like to do Continuous Deployment. So let’s assume this was a deployable commit. We immediately deploy the artifact. Artifact Repository
  17. 17. VCS Build Server Artifact Repository Deploy to infrastructure.
  18. 18. Now let’s pick our technologies.
  19. 19. Docker Hub
  20. 20. Developer commits code to GitHub.
  21. 21. Options • GitHub
 De facto source control system. • BitBucket
 Hosted but more enterprisey. Theoretical tighter integration with other Atlasssian tools. • AWS CodeCommit
 No fancy UI but fully hosted git repo in AWS.
  22. 22. GitHub uses web hooks to automatically kick off a build in CircleCI.
  23. 23. Options • CircleCI
 Hosted build tool. Awesome UI. Get up and running in an hour or less. But no first-class support for Docker. • Travis
 Hosted build tool. Built on Jenkins behind the scenes. Comparable to Circle. More expensive. • Shippable
 First-class Docker support, but clunky UI. Fast and customizable. Use your own Docker container for your build environment! • Jenkins
 The self-hosted stalwart. Medium overhead in exchange for maximum customizability.
  24. 24. Docker Hub Circle will: - build/compile - run automated tests - build a docker image - push image to Docker Hub
  25. 25. Options • Docker Hub
 The “official” place to house Docker registries. Free for public repos; paid for private. Poor UI, sometimes goes down. Easiest integration with rest of Docker ecosystem, but easy to switch to another repo. • Amazon EC2 Container Registry (ECR)
 AWS’s private container registry service. Looks like a winner. Coming out by end of year. Unless Amazon really screws up, obvious alternative to Docker Hub. • Google Cloud Registry (GCR)
 Mature, solid solution. Lowest pull latencies with Google Cloud Engine, but usable anywhere. • Quay
 Early docker registry upstart with superior UX. Acquired by CoreOS. Solid solution, but probably not as compelling as AWS ECR.
  26. 26. Docker Hub
  27. 27. Docker Hub Deploy to AWS.
  28. 28. Options • Let’s just assume all AWS for now.
  29. 29. Options within AWS • AWS EC2 Container Service (ECS)
 Amazon’s solution for running multiple services on a single VM in docker. Not perfect, but does an excellent job of being easy to setup and start using right away. • AWS Elastic Beanstalk 
 AWS’s equivalent of Platform-as-a-Service. Works great when using one Docker container per VM, and meant to be scalable, but eventually you’ll want more control over your infrastructure. • Roll Your Own
 Use a custom method to get containers deployed on your VMs. • Container Framework
 Use a framework like CoreOS+Fleet, Swarm, Mesos, Kubernetes or Nomad. • Container Framework PaaS
 Use a pre-baked solution like Deis or Flynn. Or a tool like Empire that sits on top of ECS.
  30. 30. What about our 
 app code?
  31. 31. Let’s talk about it.
  32. 32. • Re-architected the web framework from scratch. • Nice dev workflow • Young enough to be hipster; mature enough to be stable • Solid IDE support (IntelliJ) • Non-blocking / async • Outstanding performance • Designed for RESTful APIs
  33. 33. Live Demo
  34. 34. Now let’s build up our build pipeline live.
  35. 35. Step #1: Create a base 
 docker image
  36. 36. • We may have many different microservices using Docker. • A common base image = standardization • See my base docker image at:
 https://github.com/PhoenixDevOps/phxjug-ctr-base
  37. 37. • # BUILD THE BASE CONTAINER
 cd /repos/phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base
 docker build -t "phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base:3.2" .
 docker push “phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base:3.2" • NOTE: You won’t have rights to push to my repo. So replace this with your own Docker Hub repo.
  38. 38. Step #2: Create a base Play Framework docker image
  39. 39. • We may have many different microservices using Play. • Also, one of Play’s downsides is that Activator (which is really just a wrapper around SBT) uses Ivy for dependencies, and it is painfully slow on initial downloads. • If we create a Docker image with all our dependencies pre- downloaded, our docker build times will be MUCH faster. • Even if some of our dependencies are off, it’s not a big deal. The point is that we’ll get most of them here. • See my base docker image at:
 https://github.com/PhoenixDevOps/phxjug-ctr-base-play
  40. 40. • # BUILD THE BASE PLAY CONTAINER
 cd /repos/phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base-play
 docker build -t "phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base-play:2.4.3" .
 docker push "phxdevops/phxjug-ctr-base-play:2.4.3" • NOTE: You won’t have rights to push to my repo. So replace this with your own Docker Hub repo.
  41. 41. Step #3: Take our Play app and build a Docker image out of it.
  42. 42. • SBT includes a “dist” plugin that will create an executable binary for our entire Play app! • We’ll run that and make that the process around which the Docker container executes. • See my image at:
 https://github.com/PhoenixDevOps/phxjug-play- framework-demo • Note that this is a standard Play app with a Dockerfile in the root directory. “docker build” takes care of the rest.
  43. 43. • # BUILD A PLAY APP IN A CONTAINER
 cd /repos/phxdevops/phxjug-play-framework-demo
 docker build -t "phxdevops/phxjug-play-framework-demo:demo"
 docker push "phxdevops/phxjug-play-framework-demo:demo" • NOTE: You won’t have rights to push to my repo. So replace this with your own Docker Hub repo.
  44. 44. Step #4: Define our ECS Infrastructure in AWS.
  45. 45. Options • Point and click around the AWS Web Console
 Good for learning. Bad for long-term maintainability • AWS CloudFormation
 AWS’s official “infrastructure as code” tool. Pretty stable and mature, but painfully slow to work with, and JSON format gets too verbose. • Terraform
 A brilliant achievement of infrastructure as code tooling! But still suffers from some bugs. You can work around them once you get the hang of it, or with guidance from experienced hands. • Ansible
 Offers similar tool, but doesn’t compare in sophistication to CloudFormation or Terraform.
  46. 46. Our Choice • We’ll use terraform. • To save time, I’ve already provisioned the infrastructure for today. • But you can see the entire set of Terraform templates I used to create my ECS cluster at https://github.com/PhoenixDevOps/phxjug-ecs- cluster
  47. 47. Wait, how does 
 ECS work?
  48. 48. Key ECS Concepts • Cluster • Container Instances
  49. 49. Cluster
  50. 50. Container Instance Container Instance Container Instance
  51. 51. Key Concepts • Task Definitions
  52. 52. Task Definitions • JSON object • Describes how 1 or more containers should be run and possibly links Container A to Container B. • You can also use Docker Compose yml files as an alternative to the proprietary ECS JSON format.
  53. 53. Components of a 
 Task Definition • Task Family Name (e.g. “MyApp”) • 1 or more container definitions: • docker run command + args • Resource requirements (CPU, Memory)
  54. 54. Deploying new versions of your app • All your app’s versions are individual “Task Definitions” within a “Task Definition Family” • Each time you need to deploy a new version of your app, you’ll need a new Docker image with a new tag. Then just create a new Task Definition that points to the new Docker image. • ECS handles deployment for you, but there are some pitfalls here.
  55. 55. Key Concepts • Task Definitions • Task Definition Families • Tasks • Services
  56. 56. Task Definition Task Task Task Task
  57. 57. Tasks • An “instance” of a Task Definition is a Task. • Really, this just means a single Docker container (or a “group” of Docker containers if the Task Definition specified more than one Docker image).
  58. 58. Tasks as Services • Should your task always remain running? • Should it be auto-restarted if it fails? • Might it need an ELB? • Then you want to run your Task Definition as a Service!
  59. 59. Tasks and Services • Note that the same Task Definition… • …can be used to run as a one-time Task • …or a long-running Service. • That’s because Task Definitions are really just definitions of Docker containers and how they should run. It doesn’t “know” anything else about the container itself.
  60. 60. Task Task Task Task Task
  61. 61. ECS Pro’s • Very little to manage. • Built-in service discovery, cluster state management, and container scheduler. • Allows for resource-aware container placement. • Container scheduling is pluggable. • Fully baked GUI that allows you to learn/do most anything. • Tolerable learning curve. • Supported by Amazon. • Feel free to build your own service discovery!
  62. 62. ECS Con’s • Default Service Discovery:
 One ELB per service = $18/service per month —> potentially expensive • Less flexible on deployments than you’d like. • Lacks the power of a more general purpose “data center operating system” such as Mesos or Kubernetes.
  63. 63. Live Clickthrough
  64. 64. Step #5: Configure our Play app for circle.yml
  65. 65. • See https://github.com/PhoenixDevOps/phxjug- play-framework-demo/blob/master/circle.yml
  66. 66. Now let’s see it all live in action!
  67. 67. Q&A

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