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Participants are for life, not just your survey!

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Participants are for life, not just your survey!

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Participants are for life not just your survey! Thank you R-Net for the opportunity to talk to some of the bright young minds in the market research about being more human in every day research. We all know that better engagement leads to better insight so our goal with this presentation was to get the ball rolling and to challenge some of the traditional market research beliefs and practices. We would love to know what you think or if you have any ideas of your own to share?

Participants are for life not just your survey! Thank you R-Net for the opportunity to talk to some of the bright young minds in the market research about being more human in every day research. We all know that better engagement leads to better insight so our goal with this presentation was to get the ball rolling and to challenge some of the traditional market research beliefs and practices. We would love to know what you think or if you have any ideas of your own to share?

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Participants are for life, not just your survey!

  1. 1. PARTICIPANTS ARE FOR LIFE, NOT JUST YOUR SURVEY! Prepared for R-Net by: Louise Hitchen – louise.hitchen@incling.co.uk Juliet Pascall – juliet.pascall@incling.co.uk 22.09.2014
  2. 2. 2 Hello, we are incling… …a consumer insight consultancy with an entrepreneurial spirit and a can do attitude. We see collaboration as the foundation of empowering insight and specialise in creating bespoke online communities, complemented by engaging face to face sessions, for brands to have inclusive conversations with their consumers and stakeholders.
  3. 3. We are going to question 5 widely held beliefs in market research, sharing examples and a few tips and exercises that we hope will help you change your day to day work. Importantly, this is based on our experience, it is not a definitive guide. We want to present you with a starting point for further conversation.
  4. 4. 4 Market research is steeped in tradition Client Researcher Participant This traditional approach is… Hierarchical Treats the ‘respondent’ as a subject to be observed Hides business objectives Positions the researcher and client are consultative experts
  5. 5. 5 But we are facing a brave new world… And have the opportunity to take new approaches that are… Flat and inclusive Treat participants as active project members Share business objectives and challenges Co-created solutions, customers are also experts Client Researcher Participant
  6. 6. Our mission is to transform some of the traditional market research beliefs and we have started the ball rolling with 5 of our own…
  7. 7. Belief 1: Consumers are research respondents
  8. 8. This implies a hierarchical relationship where there is an assumed power and knowledge differential between those conducting the research and those being researched. Why?
  9. 9. …we saw relationships as the source of our results and assumed that you need to build trusting relationships for good co-creation and to get more realistic insight/candid opinions?
  10. 10. GIVE MORE, GET MORE take the time to share and be vulnerable
  11. 11. HUMANS ARE SOCIAL CREATURES… and we are programmed to give back when something is given to us. You can use this principle to establish a relationship and get more depth from participants with these ideas… 1. Provide a space for customers to own or set the agenda – give them the reins and an opportunity to benefit from the research 2. Be vulnerable and answer your own question first, show customers that you are willing to give as much as they are. This also sets the tone for later responses. 3. Share genuine results and challenge your clients to tell you what has been done with the research
  12. 12. Belief 2: Some participants are naturally creative, others are not.
  13. 13. Many brands are benefiting from crowdsourcing and the belief that good ideas can come form anyone, anywhere. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZXBfQqC6F0
  14. 14. GOOD IDEAS CAN COME FROM ANYWHERE Often it is the small idea that ends up winning out. You just need to create the right environment for people to contribute and feel good about it.
  15. 15. YES BUT/YES AND - AN EXERCISE TO GET YOU ALL INVOLVED… ‘Yes but’ is adversarial, no progress is made while ‘yes and’ encourages engagement and sharing without inhibition. It reframes the rules of engagement. Divide into pairs. Everyone on the right of the partnership you are going to be the ‘yes but’ person, everyone on the left you are going to be the ‘yes and’ person. Take one min for each side to answer a question (e.g. what should I do for my next holiday) and the other person to reply with ‘yes and’ or ‘yes but’. Discuss how everyone felt answering with ‘yes but’ then ‘yes and’ and suggest that for the rest of the meeting/workshop that everyone build on ideas with ‘yes and’.
  16. 16. Belief 3: Do not share too much information, it will affect the results
  17. 17. BETTER ENGAGEMENT LEADS TO BETTER INSIGHT When we share objectives, and upskill participants, we find that it’s a virtuous cycle of engagement
  18. 18. WHY SHARING IS SO IMPORTANT… 1. If you don’t share the ‘why’ behind the questions you’re asking, whichever method you’re using, participants are less likely to be engaged and invested in giving you answers. 2. Hidden objectives create uncertainty because consumers don’t feel like they know the agenda or where the questions are heading, leading to ‘safe’ responses.
  19. 19. We share as much as possible with our community members and reap the benefits… Stylist Reader “I really enjoyed being part of the community and also reading other people’s points of view. I felt like we were getting a little inside scoop on the magazine too, which is nice - makes you feel like Stylist really cares about their readers and want to do what is best for them. It also feels quite exclusive and special.”
  20. 20. Belief 4: We can get participants to focus on one specific problem
  21. 21. WHATEVER YOU RESIST WILL PERSIST! If you resist allowing your co-creators to express their fears and frustrations, it will dominate their thinking throughout the process. Allow your participants to clear the past because only then, will they be truly productive and focus on your challenge.
  22. 22. Dear Martin… My only real gripe is when you feature fashion ar1cles. A lot of the 1me, they are extremely expensive. If we're hi<ng the average modern man, yes we take care of ourselves and like to wear the latest fashion trends, but not everyone has £1,000 to spend on one wardrobe piece. We may all want to aspire to dress head to toe in Tom Ford, but perhaps you can lower the budget to more of the high street brands? Or tailor for 3 different budgets? top, middle, lower. Keep up the good work, Cheers Apepp I'm a big fan of ShortList... The copy is well wriMen and wiMy, and is certainly on trend with my personality, so I would hope the average man’s too(?). I really like the wide range of topics covered, from what to do in London/ Leeds/Manchester, to what CDs to listen to and what industry insiders reckon are the whiskys. I'm also a fan of Danny Wallace's column, so please keep that too. To achieve this we ask customers to write a postcard to the CEO and tell them: What they think the brand should continue doing Where they see opportunities for the brand
  23. 23. Before we move onto the final belief help me finish this sentence, this restaurant is……
  24. 24. And this one is…..
  25. 25. Belief 5: The questions we ask are more important than the environment we ask them in
  26. 26. CREATE THE RIGHT ENVIRONMENT All you need to do is think about the good and bad parties or restaurants you may have visited to understand how the environment plays a role in how you feel, your experience and your consequent behaviour.
  27. 27. A FEW IDEAS TO TAKE AWAY… 1. Get your clients to dress like respondents if they’re in the room (and we recommend that they are!) 2. Don’t let your clients convince you to save money by hosting the group in their store cupboard! 3. Send out invitations with what to expect, some teasers about topics to be covered (where possible in a pre-task) so that they come prepped and ready to go. 4. If you are working online use Intuitive technology that is well-designed. 5. Give a sense of ownership by providing participants with a space to start their own discussions.
  28. 28. Be human and show every research participant trust and respect drop us a note at… info@incling.co.uk call us on… +44 (0)203 070 3936 find out more at… www.incling.co.uk
  29. 29. Follow up discussion with the R-Net audience Market research assumptions or practices that we could be thinking about and challenging. • Respondent should not know each other. • When completing online surveys participants are completely focused – only doing one thing. • Participants should not do market research more than once every 6 months. • Clients do not want to share their objectives with the participants because this will reveal their strategy which is confidential. • Giving away too much information on what the survey is about will bias the results. • Online participants are boring for respondents. • Respondents don’t care…Researchers don’t care about respondents. • Presenting results can and should be more than just PowerPoint. • When work is commissioned the client knows the process and how the project will run. • Participants are dumb, create surveys that children can understand. • Participants only answer surveys for money.
  30. 30. Follow up discussion with the R-Net audience Ideas to help us challenge some of the assumptions and established practices. • If it is not possible to give away information at the start give it at the end. Perhaps a link etc. • Videos, voxpops, interactive maps, prezi presentations and bulletin boards are a much more engaging way of presenting results. • No one way mirrors, bring your clients into the focus group or workshop. • Ask fewer, better, more engaging questions. • Use props to compliment the research theme. • Encourage multiplatform engagement with participants. • Organise brainstorming sessions to see how to engage participants and what is feasible within the project budget. • We run 2 day deliberative workshops where we invite people to attend without knowing what will be discussed. At the workshops we have expert presentations on the issue to inform attendees, followed by activities and discussions to address a number of objectives and co-develop solutions. Attendees often feel empowered and passionate about the issues as a result and we get some really useful insights. • Focus groups should be in an environment that really inspires participants. We conducted a focus group recently in the space centre to get participants to think about future travel. • Put effort into a fun invite and fun questionnaire.

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